FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DEIRDRE HAMILL/ DAILY NEWS
Fans started lining up at Deliverance Evangelistic Church, 4732 N. Broad, at 6:30 this morning to say goodbye to Pearl Bailey, who died Friday at 72 of an apparent heart attack. They braved a drizzle to send off the legendary entertainer; a special entrance was set aside for celebrity friends.
NEWS
March 7, 1986
Thousands of commuters ride SEPTA. Most depend on it. I feel that SEPTA's employees realize the importance of their jobs. We have had many improvements on SEPTA lines. However, I strongly feel that SEPTA's administration does not seriously consider the riders' safety on buses. The employees provide a service for the public and are responsible for doing so. Those responsibilities should not and cannot include 20 passengers standing in the aisles. If this is legal in Pennsylvania and the United States, it should not be so. SEPTA buses have notices that no one can stand forward of the yellow line (marked on the floor)
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
About 500 standing room tickets for today's Opening Day game between the Phillies and the Houston Astros sold out quickly this mo. Depsite the cold, raint weather, about 300 people had already lined up at Citizens Bank Park two hours before the ticket office opened at 9 a.m. The SRO tickets cost $17 each. This is the 124th consecutive sold out home game for the Phillies.
SPORTS
November 9, 1993 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Want to reach somebody in the Notre Dame sports information department this week? You might have better luck getting through to the White House. In four days, top-ranked Florida State will play No. 2 Notre Dame in South Bend, Ind. Already, a circus atmosphere exists. "All of the great games seem to go through Notre Dame," Florida State coach Bobby Bowden said. "The anticipation of the last two weeks has been the worst I've ever been through. " He's not the only one who feels that way. Want to see the game in person?
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the face of massive public protest, Moorestown Township Manager Scott Carew announced Friday that he had halted the reassignment of the popular school resource officer - a veteran of the Police Department - pending further study. "For now, no changes will take place regarding the SRO," Carew said in a statement. More than 1,300 residents had signed an online petition by Friday calling for Officer Bryan Wright to stay on as resource officer, a position the school district created in 2000 after the fatal shootings at Columbine High School in Colorado.
NEWS
September 7, 1990
Within a few blocks of the State Office Building where homeless activists camped out in protest this week, a nonprofit organization has plans to build a 48-bed, YMCA-style residence for single adults trying to put their lives back together. The project represents real progress, while the homeless protesters' hope of greater government assistance is still a dream. The residence will be one of the new breed of low-rent hotels known as SROs, or single-room-occupancy. Its residents will pay what they can afford for the subsidized rooms, and in return they'll receive intensive social services to help them overcome personal problems, find employment and achieve their potential, however modest that may be. Philadelphia desperately needs facilities like this one, which will be developed by Project HOME, an organization founded by the widely respected homeless advocate Sister Mary Scullion.
NEWS
July 9, 2001
WHAT IS THE use of all those public hearings when SEPTA already had made up its mind on increasing fares? SEPTA should manage this transit system efficiently, instead of wasting money and manpower. All it does is give in to the unions every three years and increase fares. SEPTA should at least remove restrictions on seniors from 7-8 a.m. and 4:30-5:30 p.m. Letting them travel free for these two hours also would be a small step in the right direction. Oscar Shaw, Philadelphia On the first day of SEPTA's new fare hike, the 7:58 a.m. R3 train was late, had only three cars and was standing-room-only all the way into Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Early in "The Mirror Has Two Faces," Barbra Streisand's heroine, Rose, resists some well-intentioned makeover advice from a friend, who's suggesting: "How about a perm?" "I tried that once," Rose sighs. "I looked like Shirley Temple on crack. " Aha! We haven't forgotten Streisand's infamous '70s poodle perm - and neither, apparently, has the star, though she's now one of the '90s' biggest glamourpusses. That winking self-effacement doesn't mean "The Mirror Has Two Faces" - "a film by Barbra Streisand . . . directed by Barbra Streisand . . . starring Barbra Streisand . . . with 'Love Theme' composed by Barbra Streisand" - isn't as self-conscious and Streisand-obsessed as "Prince of Tides" or her other vanity productions.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Secrecy and paranoia have a place in sports. Football playbooks are guarded as if they held launch codes for nukes. Baseball teams hunt for sign-stealing spies in the scoreboard. But when it comes to making nine-digit commitments of taxpayer dollars to new stadiums in Philadelphia, a little more openness would be nice. The players - Gov. Ridge, Mayor Rendell, the Eagles' Jeffrey Lurie, the Phillies' Bill Giles - huddle in private and keep mum, save for hints that a "deal" will be forthcoming after Ridge's Nov. 3 walkover.
NEWS
August 6, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Theater Critic
Lunch may be more entertaining on Walnut Street for the next couple of weeks. Beginning tomorrow, an ad hoc company of students at the Walnut Street Theater School, trading as the "Lunchtime Theater," will be getting in some experiential licks before midday audiences in the Walnut's Studio 3. That's on the third floor of the five-story warren of rooms and offices adjacent to the Walnut proper. Tomorrow, Wednesday and Friday, and again on Aug. 13, 14 and 15, Lunchtime Theater will present the Lee Blessing comedy "Nice People Dancing to Good Country Music" from 12:30 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. No lunch will be served, but patrons are encouraged to bring their own and dine during the performance.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the face of massive public protest, Moorestown Township Manager Scott Carew announced Friday that he had halted the reassignment of the popular school resource officer - a veteran of the Police Department - pending further study. "For now, no changes will take place regarding the SRO," Carew said in a statement. More than 1,300 residents had signed an online petition by Friday calling for Officer Bryan Wright to stay on as resource officer, a position the school district created in 2000 after the fatal shootings at Columbine High School in Colorado.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Having missed Bruce Springsteen's two-hour set in Asbury Park last Saturday, I decided to catch up with Jersey's other rock star, Chris Christie. A natural performer, he has conducted 70 town-hall meetings since becoming governor two years ago, but the Voorhees event was Christie's first ever in a mall. It was a Town Mall meeting! Also, the launch of the 10 percent Tax Cut/Christie for President 2016 tour. The governor's staff advised arriving an hour early. Really, to discuss the budget?
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
About 500 standing room tickets for today's Opening Day game between the Phillies and the Houston Astros sold out quickly this mo. Depsite the cold, raint weather, about 300 people had already lined up at Citizens Bank Park two hours before the ticket office opened at 9 a.m. The SRO tickets cost $17 each. This is the 124th consecutive sold out home game for the Phillies.
NEWS
September 9, 2008
Inquirer: Craig LaBan's special guest today is Stephen Starr, the man behind many familiar Philadelphia restaurants, including Buddakan, Morimoto, Alma de Cuba, El Vez, The Continental, Barclay Prime, Pod and Tangerine. He's also expanded into New York and Atlantic City. Craig: Good afternoon, my hungry friends, and welcome back to our weekly chat on the Philly food beat. Today we have a special guest: Stephen Starr joins us from a remote computer located in the nerve center of the Starr Restaurant Empire at Second and Market.
NEWS
July 9, 2001
WHAT IS THE use of all those public hearings when SEPTA already had made up its mind on increasing fares? SEPTA should manage this transit system efficiently, instead of wasting money and manpower. All it does is give in to the unions every three years and increase fares. SEPTA should at least remove restrictions on seniors from 7-8 a.m. and 4:30-5:30 p.m. Letting them travel free for these two hours also would be a small step in the right direction. Oscar Shaw, Philadelphia On the first day of SEPTA's new fare hike, the 7:58 a.m. R3 train was late, had only three cars and was standing-room-only all the way into Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1999 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Who were all those unfamiliar faces at the Philadelphia Orchestra's concert Monday night? The answer, of course, lies in the fact that few of the 2,900 or so people who helped sell out the Academy of Music thought they were at a Philadelphia Orchestra concert. They thought they were at a James Taylor concert. And so they were. "This is fascinating," said one orchestra board member to another at the concert, referring to the obviously younger than usual audience. "This is what we need to tap into," the other said.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | By Chris Satullo, Deputy Editorial Page Editor
Secrecy and paranoia have a place in sports. Football playbooks are guarded as if they held launch codes for nukes. Baseball teams hunt for sign-stealing spies in the scoreboard. But when it comes to making nine-digit commitments of taxpayer dollars to new stadiums in Philadelphia, a little more openness would be nice. The players - Gov. Ridge, Mayor Rendell, the Eagles' Jeffrey Lurie, the Phillies' Bill Giles - huddle in private and keep mum, save for hints that a "deal" will be forthcoming after Ridge's Nov. 3 walkover.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There are four million stories in this naked city and three are drawing standing-room-only crowds at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. Documentaries about South Philadelphia girls becoming women, the North Penn school board and its controversial president Donna L. Mengel, and a Kensington mother's fight for welfare are among 16 nonfiction films now competing at the nation's premier showcase for independent directors. Could a Philadelphia-themed documentary join the ranks of Sundance success stories such as Hoop Dreams and Crumb?
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Early in "The Mirror Has Two Faces," Barbra Streisand's heroine, Rose, resists some well-intentioned makeover advice from a friend, who's suggesting: "How about a perm?" "I tried that once," Rose sighs. "I looked like Shirley Temple on crack. " Aha! We haven't forgotten Streisand's infamous '70s poodle perm - and neither, apparently, has the star, though she's now one of the '90s' biggest glamourpusses. That winking self-effacement doesn't mean "The Mirror Has Two Faces" - "a film by Barbra Streisand . . . directed by Barbra Streisand . . . starring Barbra Streisand . . . with 'Love Theme' composed by Barbra Streisand" - isn't as self-conscious and Streisand-obsessed as "Prince of Tides" or her other vanity productions.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA opened its first public hearing yesterday afternoon to discuss its 1997 budget with Chester County commuters, but little was discussed with a public conspicuous by its absence. Only two people testified during a hearing at the West Chester Area Senior Center in West Chester, which lasted less than an hour. After hearing examiner John A. Miller opened up the floor for remarks on a budget $75 million in the red, Penn State's Lawrence S. Cote called on SEPTA to preserve its services for collegians.
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