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NEWS
August 6, 1990
Proponents call it a win-win situation. Others brand it a loser from the start. Honest folks will tell you the Special Services District proposal for Center City Philadelphia is a big gamble. Unless more than a third of 2,500 commercial and residential property owners in Center City reject the proposal, all property owners in the proposed district would be required to pay an additional charge of roughly 4.5 percent of their annual real estate bill. The $6.3 million raised through this new tax would enable the privately run SSD to hire about 115 people to provide daily sidewalk sweeping and maintenance, monthly sidewalk washing, graffiti removal, and landscape maintenance in the district.
NEWS
August 3, 1990
Around the Inquirer Editorial Board, we often refer to the Commentary Page as "a marketplace of ideas. " By that, we mean it's meant to put forth ideas from across the spectrum of opinion, and it was in that spirit that an article appeared there yesterday by Neil Benson opposing the Special Services District in Center City, a program we support. We have to say, however, that Mr. Benson said a number of things that were just flat wrong. Mr. Benson would have readers believe that hospitals, cultural and religious institutions wouldn't contribute to the SSD; many of them will, and voluntarily.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Property owners in the proposed Center City Special Services District have said they are willing to pay more taxes for more city services. Or more accurately, they didn't say they weren't. Advocates took those sounds of silence to mean victory for the Special Services District, proposed for an 80-block area in Center City. "We're really delighted," Paul R. Levy, executive director of the Central Philadelphia Development Corporation, said yesterday after the deadline passed for property owners to veto the district.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | By NEIL BENSON
It is bitterly ironic that as democracy flowers worldwide, and people who for decades have suffered under dictatorships awaken to the sweet freedom of elected government, we here in the birthplace of democracy are about to quietly have those very same rights taken from us by a new quasi-governmental agency - the Special Services District. Unless effective opposition surfaces within the next 45 days, the SSD will be given near total control of our Center City. This self-serving group of developers and businessmen, who almost exclusively live outside Philadelphia, will have the authority to add a 4.5 percent surcharge on top of what are already very high property taxes.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DANIEL CONNER, a lifelong Germantown resident who owns a rental property in the neighborhood, doesn't think it's fair that he soon may have to pay an added tax for trash cleanup and other services. Conner made his opinion clear at a meeting Thursday night, at which the steering committee tasked with restoring the now-defunct Germantown Special Services District presented its proposed plan and budget for the reinvigorated district. The budget includes an additional tax assessment on more than 200 area businesses.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
Sometimes you have to get beyond the headlines to discover what's really going on in the city. A perfect example was last week's hearing in City Council over the business community's proposal to create a special services district (SSD) for center city. Start with the Odd Couple: Ron Rubin and Jack Collins were two of the major players promoting the concept of a special real estate tax surcharge on center-city property owners to finance extra police and sanitation services.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
It's hard to believe that, after all the uncertainty and anticipation, the new Special Services District for Center City is about to become a reality. According to Paul Levy, the capable director of the SSD, cleaning crews will hit the streets in late March - sweeping, vacuuming and steam-cleaning downtown sidewalks. The city will simultaneously step up its sweeping of the streets themselves, as well as emptying litter baskets more frequently to keep them from overflowing. The impact in the 80-block district should be considerable, but this effort alone won't solve the litter problem downtown.
NEWS
August 3, 1990
It took a bantam retiree, one Herschel Baron, to cut through all the hand- wringing by Center City residents and the few business people who objected to the new tax-and-services district at public hearings this week. Mr. Baron, a member of the Center City Residents Association, listened to complaints from people who claimed the services district wouldn't make Center City safer, would cost too much or wouldn't benefit them personally. Then he got to his feet and made what has to be the best case for going ahead with the services district: "This is in the best interests of the (whole)
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
You don't know whether to giggle or gag after reading James DeLong's recent testimony before City Council. Thanks to procurement and personnel policies from the Dark Ages, DeLong (who runs the airport for the city) actually had to return about $11 million to the airlines because he couldn't spend it. For instance, the airport has been trying for two and a half years to buy sweepers needed to keep airport runways and aprons clean. Two and a half years! For little things, like repairing a lock on a door, DeLong says it can take a from 60 to 200 days - just to repair a lock!
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
A plan to exempt Center City homeowners from paying a proposed real estate surcharge for extra security and cleaning services in a proposed special services district has apparently appeased many property owners. But it has left renters, who fear the surcharge will be passed on to them, still angry. "It's a democracy in which renters are slaves," said Neil Benson, who rents a house on Mole Street. "We have no rights. It's taxation without representation. " Benson was among 100 residents who attended a meeting last night at Academy House condominiums to discuss a plan to create an 80-block Center City Special Services District, with enhanced cleaning and security, including 40 uniformed personnel in radio contact with a police mini-station.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
DANIEL CONNER, a lifelong Germantown resident who owns a rental property in the neighborhood, doesn't think it's fair that he soon may have to pay an added tax for trash cleanup and other services. Conner made his opinion clear at a meeting Thursday night, at which the steering committee tasked with restoring the now-defunct Germantown Special Services District presented its proposed plan and budget for the reinvigorated district. The budget includes an additional tax assessment on more than 200 area businesses.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
Meet Jennifer. She is another victim trapped in the baffling world of bureaucracy. Jennifer is blonde, intelligent and willing to work. She is 31 years old. Her mental illness, hardly uncommon, was diagnosed several years ago as major depressive disorder and borderline personality. When she was most severely ill, several times she tried suicide, once by deliberatly driving her car at a high rate of speed and smashing it into a concrete barrier. She sustained injuries and many of her teeth were knocked out. Through years of treatment, including drug and shock therapy, Jennifer advanced steadily to the point that she can function independently.
NEWS
February 25, 1991 | BY W. RUSSELL G. BYERS
You don't know whether to giggle or gag after reading James DeLong's recent testimony before City Council. Thanks to procurement and personnel policies from the Dark Ages, DeLong (who runs the airport for the city) actually had to return about $11 million to the airlines because he couldn't spend it. For instance, the airport has been trying for two and a half years to buy sweepers needed to keep airport runways and aprons clean. Two and a half years! For little things, like repairing a lock on a door, DeLong says it can take a from 60 to 200 days - just to repair a lock!
NEWS
February 17, 1991
It's hard to believe that, after all the uncertainty and anticipation, the new Special Services District for Center City is about to become a reality. According to Paul Levy, the capable director of the SSD, cleaning crews will hit the streets in late March - sweeping, vacuuming and steam-cleaning downtown sidewalks. The city will simultaneously step up its sweeping of the streets themselves, as well as emptying litter baskets more frequently to keep them from overflowing. The impact in the 80-block district should be considerable, but this effort alone won't solve the litter problem downtown.
NEWS
September 20, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Property owners in the proposed Center City Special Services District have said they are willing to pay more taxes for more city services. Or more accurately, they didn't say they weren't. Advocates took those sounds of silence to mean victory for the Special Services District, proposed for an 80-block area in Center City. "We're really delighted," Paul R. Levy, executive director of the Central Philadelphia Development Corporation, said yesterday after the deadline passed for property owners to veto the district.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
A plan to exempt Center City homeowners from paying a proposed real estate surcharge for extra security and cleaning services in a proposed special services district has apparently appeased many property owners. But it has left renters, who fear the surcharge will be passed on to them, still angry. "It's a democracy in which renters are slaves," said Neil Benson, who rents a house on Mole Street. "We have no rights. It's taxation without representation. " Benson was among 100 residents who attended a meeting last night at Academy House condominiums to discuss a plan to create an 80-block Center City Special Services District, with enhanced cleaning and security, including 40 uniformed personnel in radio contact with a police mini-station.
NEWS
August 16, 1990
ENTIRE RIGHT TO PRIVACY MAY NOW BE AT RISK David Souter's nomination to the Supreme Court has been presented as a serious threat to the right to abortion. It is most certainly that. But what has been missing from the news coverage on Judge Souter's nomination is the fact that the threat actually encompasses much more than the abortion right. We could just as easily lose our right to use birth control, to choose if, when and with whom we have sexual relationships, and whom we marry.
NEWS
August 6, 1990
Proponents call it a win-win situation. Others brand it a loser from the start. Honest folks will tell you the Special Services District proposal for Center City Philadelphia is a big gamble. Unless more than a third of 2,500 commercial and residential property owners in Center City reject the proposal, all property owners in the proposed district would be required to pay an additional charge of roughly 4.5 percent of their annual real estate bill. The $6.3 million raised through this new tax would enable the privately run SSD to hire about 115 people to provide daily sidewalk sweeping and maintenance, monthly sidewalk washing, graffiti removal, and landscape maintenance in the district.
NEWS
August 3, 1990
Around the Inquirer Editorial Board, we often refer to the Commentary Page as "a marketplace of ideas. " By that, we mean it's meant to put forth ideas from across the spectrum of opinion, and it was in that spirit that an article appeared there yesterday by Neil Benson opposing the Special Services District in Center City, a program we support. We have to say, however, that Mr. Benson said a number of things that were just flat wrong. Mr. Benson would have readers believe that hospitals, cultural and religious institutions wouldn't contribute to the SSD; many of them will, and voluntarily.
NEWS
August 3, 1990
It took a bantam retiree, one Herschel Baron, to cut through all the hand- wringing by Center City residents and the few business people who objected to the new tax-and-services district at public hearings this week. Mr. Baron, a member of the Center City Residents Association, listened to complaints from people who claimed the services district wouldn't make Center City safer, would cost too much or wouldn't benefit them personally. Then he got to his feet and made what has to be the best case for going ahead with the services district: "This is in the best interests of the (whole)
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