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Stadium

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NEWS
July 5, 1997
Last week, the Phillies' Bill Giles began his campaign for a new ballpark for Center City. "We can't survive without it," Giles said. "If we don't see a stadium on the horizon by 1999, it'll be very difficult for this group [of investors] to continue. " Does the city need a new sports stadium? Should it be for baseball, football or both? Where should it go, and who should pay for it? Send your responses to Community Voices/The Stadium by July 11 at the address above.
NEWS
November 15, 1998
Pennsylvania is considering building new stadiums for the Eagles and Phillies, with the cost equally divided among the teams, the state and the city. If the deal goes through, how should Philadelphia finance its share? A sports lottery? A city or regional sales tax? User fees? Or something else? Send essays of 100 words by Nov. 30, including a phone number for verification, to Community Voices/Stadium at the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
July 11, 2001
You can bet that Emperor Titus, who presided over the Roman Colosseum's 80 A.D. inauguration, didn't fret that the structure would get renamed something like Little Caesars Amphitheater. He may well have thought, however, that the Colosseum forever would be the site of spectacles galore and spectacles of gore. Instead, it's been mostly decline, fall and invasion by cats since then for the huge amphitheater - but better days are possible. A decade-long, $18 million restoration project now under way is the most elaborate in 165 years.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
By Rick Eckstein If you build it, they will come. This is usually the mantra of those in favor of publicly financed sports stadiums, including the current proposal for a new soccer stadium in Chester. In this case they are visitors whose spending would turn devastated cities and neighborhoods into exciting destination points. Local schools, merchants, and residents all would benefit as municipal coffers swelled. There's only one problem with this scenario. It's not true. Never has been.
SPORTS
July 15, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Didn't see this news coming from North Broad Street. If it ends up happening - if Temple's board of trustees ousts president Neil D. Theobald - a question comes up immediately: What would that mean for Temple's building a campus football stadium? At a glance, you might think Temple would continue its present course, steering toward building the stadium. In addition to the bombshell news at Tuesday's board meeting - the board of trustees announcing it had taken a unanimous vote of no confidence in Theobald and intended to dismiss him - the board also approved spending $250,000 more on the current stadium feasibility study, adding a traffic impact report.
NEWS
November 6, 2001
HOW AM I supposed to empathize with the mayor on the issue of the imminent takeover of our school system given the mayor's track record. We have spent many millions of dollars to fund the new stadium projects. In fact, it is one of the single biggest items on the city budget. (Another big item is education.) We have also spent incredible amounts of money to tow abandoned cars off the street as a way to combat urban blight. So now we are left with a dysfunctional public-education system with staggering rates of failure in math and reading in some districts, yet we are angry at a state takeover.
NEWS
March 15, 1999 | FRIEDA FEHRENBACHER
In your photo of the proposed Broad and Spring Garden site for Philadelphia's new baseball stadium (March 5), the Daily News/Inquirer Building is pictured and diagrammed as staying put. Certainly your employees, Spring Garden residents and some Community College students who use this neighborhood's street parking will be left holding the booby-prize bag in this profoundly ill-considered proposal. I hesitate to use the word "plan," because only the stadium itself, and the roaring crowds within it, seem to have been envisioned on paper.
SPORTS
June 5, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
A federal bankruptcy judge approved an agreement yesterday ending Adelphia's 15-year stadium naming rights deal with the Tennessee Titans. The deal allows the Titans to immediately begin selling promotional inventory and in-stadium advertising that had been given to Adelphia. Adelphia, based in Coudersport, Pa., filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection March 27. The company was responsible for paying $2 million a year to the Titans under the $30 million deal signed in July 1999.
SPORTS
April 10, 1996 | by Paul Hagen and Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writers
When it was announced Comcast was buying into the Flyers and 76ers last month, there was immediate speculation it would be only logical for the giant communications firm to align itself in some way with the Phillies as well. Since then, though, there have been few outward and visible signs that any progress has been made on that front. Sources claiming to have knowledge of the situation, however, told the Daily News there have been ongoing, if delicate, negotiations between the two businesses and a blockbuster announcement could be made within the next several weeks.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 13, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Thousands of ticketless Eagles fans flocked to the parking lots and to the Xfinity Live pub in the shadow of Lincoln Financial Field for Sunday's season opener, seeking the in-stadium vibe outside the stadium. Tailgaters yelled at RV outdoor TVs while hearing the Linc crowd yelling with them, slightly out of synch because of the broadcast's time delay. "If we hear the cheers a few seconds before we see the play on TV, we know we just did good," said Scott Ellison from Northeast Philadelphia, who watched the game on his pal Alfio "DaGoose" Rossillo's Green Magic bus TV. "If we hear boos, we know we're going to see something bad. " Ellison said he loves watching the game from Rossillo's bus because "Al's got two smokers with brisket, shrimp, and wings, and the beer is free.
SPORTS
August 10, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
LOS ANGELES - Every night, Chase Utley said, he sees one or two Phillies jerseys in the stands. The native Californian plays here, so far from the first 13 years of his major-league career that made him an adopted son of Philadelphia. But the jerseys are a reminder. So is a certain phrase he uttered after a parade one October afternoon. "I hear it here at this stadium," Utley said Monday as he grabbed the top of the home dugout at Dodger Stadium, hours before he faced his old team for the first time.
SPORTS
July 23, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Thursday's private board of trustees session ended, and the board walked out and announced the deed was done. Neil D. Theobald had agreed to resign as Temple's president, no terms of a settlement announced. Afterward, several board members, including board chair Patrick J. O'Connor, made it clear that the building of a campus football stadium remained a front-burner issue, still moving forward. "Nothing. Nada, " O'Connor said when asked what will change about the stadium drive with Theobald out. O'Connor termed the economics "pretty simple" as far as building a new place or continuing to pay rent to the Eagles.
SPORTS
July 15, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
WE'VE NEVER been a nation that allows the dissonance between our words and actions to slow us down, so perhaps we should look at Temple's proposed football stadium less as an unnecessary vanity project with the potential to metastasize into a full-blown money pit and more as a monument to the indomitable nature of the American spirit. Take, for example, the following sequence that seems to have occurred inside a campus boardroom earlier this week: 1) A majority of those in attendance agreed that a financial-aid budget deficit that had ballooned from $9 million to $22 million was an issue serious enough to warrant the removal of the president responsible for said budget.
SPORTS
July 15, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Didn't see this news coming from North Broad Street. If it ends up happening - if Temple's board of trustees ousts president Neil D. Theobald - a question comes up immediately: What would that mean for Temple's building a campus football stadium? At a glance, you might think Temple would continue its present course, steering toward building the stadium. In addition to the bombshell news at Tuesday's board meeting - the board of trustees announcing it had taken a unanimous vote of no confidence in Theobald and intended to dismiss him - the board also approved spending $250,000 more on the current stadium feasibility study, adding a traffic impact report.
SPORTS
May 27, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
As Temple continues its moves toward an on-campus football stadium, here's a discussion the school's hierarchy should have: Would a campus stadium be opening a door Temple wants to keep shut? Like the rest of the American Athletic Conference, Temple would presumably jump at the chance to join a Power 5 league. That's where the money is. Right now, Temple isn't just the best option if a Power 5 league wants to add the Philadelphia market. It's the only option. And it's not far-fetched to think the Atlantic Coast Conference might someday want to add a local outpost.
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Temple University has selected Moody Nolan, which calls itself the largest African American-owned and -managed architecture firm in the country, to design a proposed football stadium for its North Philadelphia neighborhood, officials announced Monday. Curtis J. Moody, president and CEO of the Columbus, Ohio-based company, already has met with community members, said Ray Betzner, a university spokesman. Betzner said the firm's willingness to work with neighbors made it a clear choice for the job. "Moody Nolan is regarded as a national leader in designing beautiful sports and recreation facilities that not only fit their purpose but also fit the communities in which they exist," Temple president Neil D. Theobald said in a statement.
NEWS
February 16, 2016
Temple University was charged with energy in September of 1984 when I arrived as a freshman, just as a Philadelphia comedian launched what would become a smash hit of a television show. You've heard of Bill Cosby, right? He became a national ambassador for Temple, which swelled in enrollment as it evolved from "commuter school" to academic destination. You probably haven't heard of Spurgeon Link. He was a street vendor who vexed Temple's plans to homogenize North Broad Street as the center stage for the growing campus.
NEWS
February 12, 2016
WOULD YOU want a football stadium in your Neighborhood? That's what Temple University's Board of Trustees wants to "bless" North Philadelphians with. A new 35,000-seat stadium will create traffic bedlam (just ask South Philadelphians), increase cancer rates because of noxious and toxic fumes and reduce parking availability for neighborhood residents. North Philadelphia residents have sacrificed enough over the years to my alma mater. First, Temple should spend whatever it takes to achieve an 80% employment rate among neighborhood residents as a gesture of goodwill before asking for any more sacrifices.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder and Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITERS
Despite a boisterous protest outside its meeting, and blistering comments from community members inside, Temple University's board of trustees on Monday decided to take the next step in pursuing an on-campus stadium. Their unanimous vote came without debate following about an hour of comments from community residents, most of them critical, and a presentation by the board chair and the university president. Their decision paves the way for designs to begin for a 35,000-seat stadium in the northwest corner of campus.
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