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SPORTS
April 28, 2011 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is the year you've been waiting for at the Penn Relays. No, that doesn't mean Usain Bolt is making a return visit. He isn't. But what we do mean is: The South Street Bridge is back in operation after a two-year rebuilding project, making it easier to get over the Schuylkill by foot and by car (well, definitely easier by foot) to Franklin Field. The bridge reopening also means there is access directly on South Street to the Hollenback Center stairs to the lower street level that leads to the fields where the javelin, shot put, discus, and hammer are being contested.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It was Oct. 9, 1914 - the first game of the World Series pitting the Philadelphia Athletics against the Boston Braves. Across 20th Street from Shibe Park, fans filled bleachers built on the roofs of rowhouses. Others sat in open windows, or on the roof of front porches or second-floor bay windows. OK, Boston took the series in four straight, but the defeat of the A's didn't make those rowhouses cheaper than when it began. These days, especially in cities where the ball teams are destined for greatness in 2013, prices for houses and condos can be higher near stadiums than farther out. Philadelphians can expect to pay a median of $145 per square foot for houses one or two miles within Citizens Bank Park, says Jed Kolko, chief economist for the search engine Trulia.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Music, magic, puppets and plays will be a part of this summer's 1988 Summer Children's Theater series, sponsored by the Camden County Park Commission. Each of the 24 shows is free. This is about the 10th year that the commission has held the series, said John McNally, a recreation supervisor for the organization. McNally took over the series six years ago. "It's very popular. We average about 350 to 400 people at each show," he said. This year, for the first time, the series will include evening shows, which will be held in the stadium area of Cooper River Park in Pennsauken.
SPORTS
July 26, 2003 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They've shown it off to the media, to the sponsors, to the luxury-suite owners and the club-seat patrons. This weekend, the Eagles will open their new Lincoln Financial Field free of charge to everyone else who wants to see it. Today's open house is for season-ticket holders only. They're welcome from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. To get in, they will need the ticket for the event that came in the mail with their football tickets. In addition to visiting their own seats, they will be able to walk the concourses and tour the two club lounges.
NEWS
March 7, 1996 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The team holding an environmental microscope to South and Southwest Philadelphia thought it had pulled off a coup when it scrounged up six more air-pollution measuring devices in a tight budget year. That was before community activists began clamoring for more monitors. At a contentious meeting yesterday with representatives of the Environmental Protection Agency, activists each told why their neighborhood needed a monitor most. "We're all fighting each other for the most contaminated neighborhood - the most pollution," said Gloria Inverso, whose Italian Market area likely will get a monitor because of its numerous auto body shops.
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
Peach pizza, peach pancakes, a Little Miss Peach contest and two peach runs are some of the features at the fourth annual Camden County Regional Peach Festival Saturday and next Sunday in Pennsauken. "Anything to do with peaches, we're going to do it," said Linda Butenis- Vorsa, festival treasurer. "Not a lot of people know New Jersey grows peaches," she said. In fact, New Jersey produced more peaches last year than Georgia, and is third in the nation in peach production. Camden County is the fourth largest peach producer in the state, with 2,500 of New Jersey's 14,000 peach-devoted acres, she said.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | BY ANNA C. VERNA
We know the Philadelphia 76ers and the Flyers are considering a flight to what they may consider are the greener pastures of Camden. Personally, I take no interest in these teams; as a city leader, I have great concern. My first priority has always been and will always be the quality of life for my constituents. They have lived for years with the overwhelming burden of the sports complex in their backyards - 60,000 fans fighting for 10,000 parking spaces, spectators who picnic on neighbors' lawns, leave their trash and defecate and urinate before departing, loud fans who tailgate in nearby parking facilities, and of course, the not so unusual spectator who screams obscenities at those who dare to challenge any of the above roguish behaviors.
SPORTS
November 17, 1999 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While the Eagles launched a high-tech bid to save their new stadium yesterday, the Phillies quietly released more information on their deal - one that went south both literally and figuratively. After playing hide-and-seek for months on where the team's new park was slated to go, artist renderings released yesterday clearly showed a city skyline seen from the Sports Complex in South Philadelphia. That the Phils had abandoned their hopes for a Broad and Spring Garden Streets site is not exactly news.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Street's stadium proposal encountered some choppy waters on its voyage toward approval yesterday, as City Council members complained about community protections and team contributions in the billion-dollar stadium package. Mayor Street hopes to get the bill approved by Dec. 14, which would require Council to agree on final terms by the end of the week. At a fifth day of hearings, city officials agreed to a zoning change to reassure South Philadelphia residents about potential development in the stadium area, and Councilman Jim Kenney complained about the rush toward approval.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major water-main break near 21st and Bainbridge Streets in Philadelphia on Sunday night forced the evacuation of three to four blocks of residents, city officials said. Water service to homes in a wider swath of South Philadelphia was affected. Some Center City residents reported also losing water. Water in the area of the break was shut off as evacuees were being taken to the E.M. Stanton School at 17th and Christian Streets by the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It was Oct. 9, 1914 - the first game of the World Series pitting the Philadelphia Athletics against the Boston Braves. Across 20th Street from Shibe Park, fans filled bleachers built on the roofs of rowhouses. Others sat in open windows, or on the roof of front porches or second-floor bay windows. OK, Boston took the series in four straight, but the defeat of the A's didn't make those rowhouses cheaper than when it began. These days, especially in cities where the ball teams are destined for greatness in 2013, prices for houses and condos can be higher near stadiums than farther out. Philadelphians can expect to pay a median of $145 per square foot for houses one or two miles within Citizens Bank Park, says Jed Kolko, chief economist for the search engine Trulia.
NEWS
December 19, 2012
PHILADELPHIA is beautiful, clean, safe and tolerant. Stop laughing! I'm not saying it and probably neither are you. Philadelphians often are the burr under their own saddles. In the '70s, adman Elliott Curson crafted the following words for a sardonic billboard overlooking the Schuylkill Expressway near Conshohocken: "Philadelphia Isn't As Bad As Philadelphians Say It Is. " It was paid for by a group called Action Philadelphia (RIP). The billboard reflected a commonly held addytude among Philadelphians, who divide their time between bragging about Philly and trashing it. Scottish poet Robert Burns wrote of the gift "to see ourselves as others see us," to get a truer view of who and what we are. Philadelphians see ourselves through a filter of our experience.
NEWS
July 24, 2012 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A major water-main break near 21st and Bainbridge Streets in Philadelphia on Sunday night forced the evacuation of three to four blocks of residents, city officials said. Water service to homes in a wider swath of South Philadelphia was affected. Some Center City residents reported also losing water. Water in the area of the break was shut off as evacuees were being taken to the E.M. Stanton School at 17th and Christian Streets by the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
September 22, 2011 | BY PHILLIP LUCAS, lucasp@phillynews.com 215-854-5914
FED UP with litterbugs in your neighborhood? Then talk trash with the Marquis by sending a note to trash@phillynews.com . STADIUM DISSERVICE: Living near Philly's beloved sports stadiums means neighbors are begrudgingly used to noise, traffic and even a few drunk fans who come and go on game day. What occasionally gets left behind, one neighbor says, is the litter. Debbie Frommer typically sees workers with the Sports Complex Special Services District in their navy-blue pants and red shirts walking through her South Philly neighborhood with trash cans and brooms.
SPORTS
April 28, 2011 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is the year you've been waiting for at the Penn Relays. No, that doesn't mean Usain Bolt is making a return visit. He isn't. But what we do mean is: The South Street Bridge is back in operation after a two-year rebuilding project, making it easier to get over the Schuylkill by foot and by car (well, definitely easier by foot) to Franklin Field. The bridge reopening also means there is access directly on South Street to the Hollenback Center stairs to the lower street level that leads to the fields where the javelin, shot put, discus, and hammer are being contested.
SPORTS
October 3, 2006 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The signs were everywhere, and it seemed the on-air talent and production workers were, too. This is the first year that ESPN is telecasting Monday Night Football, and the all-sports network is making a big splash. In addition to last night's Eagles-Packers game at Lincoln Financial Field, ESPN also telecast its two lead-in shows - Prime Time, from 6 to 7 p.m., and Monday Night Countdown, from 7 to 8:30 - from the Linc. To provide all that programming, a crew of about 450 was assembled, according to Bill Hofheimer, ESPN's director of communications.
SPORTS
July 26, 2003 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They've shown it off to the media, to the sponsors, to the luxury-suite owners and the club-seat patrons. This weekend, the Eagles will open their new Lincoln Financial Field free of charge to everyone else who wants to see it. Today's open house is for season-ticket holders only. They're welcome from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. To get in, they will need the ticket for the event that came in the mail with their football tickets. In addition to visiting their own seats, they will be able to walk the concourses and tour the two club lounges.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Street's stadium proposal encountered some choppy waters on its voyage toward approval yesterday, as City Council members complained about community protections and team contributions in the billion-dollar stadium package. Mayor Street hopes to get the bill approved by Dec. 14, which would require Council to agree on final terms by the end of the week. At a fifth day of hearings, city officials agreed to a zoning change to reassure South Philadelphia residents about potential development in the stadium area, and Councilman Jim Kenney complained about the rush toward approval.
NEWS
December 4, 2000
The stadium dilemma Considering funding construction of stadiums, let's explore these questions: Assuming the stadium bill isn't passed, would it make much sense to pour public funds into the Vet, whose feasible life expectancy, barring a major overhaul, is less than a decade? In light of decreasing population and the alarming trend of suburban flight, how would losing half of its professional sports industry reflect on Philadelphia's progression/growth? How would our teams playing in the worst facilities in major league baseball and football look?
SPORTS
November 17, 1999 | By Christopher K. Hepp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While the Eagles launched a high-tech bid to save their new stadium yesterday, the Phillies quietly released more information on their deal - one that went south both literally and figuratively. After playing hide-and-seek for months on where the team's new park was slated to go, artist renderings released yesterday clearly showed a city skyline seen from the Sports Complex in South Philadelphia. That the Phils had abandoned their hopes for a Broad and Spring Garden Streets site is not exactly news.
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