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Stadium

SPORTS
January 28, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
STATE COLLEGE - Ever since it was disassembled in 1960 and relocated to an eastern edge of Penn State's campus, Beaver Stadium, like some '57 Chevy in Cuba, has been repaired, patched and, where possible, upgraded. But after 56 years, Happy Valley's most iconic structure is rusting, sputtering and due either for a major overhaul or replacement. "When you stand on the Beaver Stadium field at kickoff and there are 107,000 fans in the stands, there's not a better place in college football," said Phil Esten, Penn State's deputy director of athletics.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By David Sell, Staff Writer
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney criticized the Eagles ownership Friday for trying to make a bigger profit on a new lease proposal for Temple University to play football games at Lincoln Financial Field. "The Eagles are frustrating to me," Kenney said after speaking in the morning at the My Brother's Keeper Philadelphia Summit at Community College of Philadelphia. In his view, "they are not ... as community-committed as the Phillies, Flyers, and Sixers are. " Kenney said part of his frustration was that hundreds of millions of dollars in tax money helped build the Eagles a stadium and raise the value of the professional football franchise.
NEWS
December 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Staff Writer
Mayor-elect Jim Kenney met with Temple University officials Thursday and told them they must address the worries of neighbors before he can endorse the school's plan to build a football stadium on campus. "Temple asked for this meeting to explain the benefits of building their stadium," Kenney's spokeswoman, Lauren Hitt, said in a statement Thursday night. "The mayor-elect enjoyed meeting with the university's representatives, and he appreciated them working with the city on this issue.
SPORTS
December 18, 2015 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
LET'S THINK outside the box score for a second. Forget about football. Forget about school spirit. Forget about all of the abstract notions that Temple president Neil Theobald asks you to think about when he attempts to explain why it makes sense for Temple to pursue the construction of a $100 million, on-campus football stadium. No doubt, it makes sense for the school's administrators. After all, it isn't their money. The $8.3 million in annual university revenue that Temple was transferring to its athletic department to fund its sports programs as of 2014?
SPORTS
December 16, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Jim Kenney's Twitter feed confirms that Philadelphia's incoming mayor is a sports fan. A recent tweet: He may have been difficult to manage, but I liked DeSean. Wish he was still an Eagle. — Jim Kenney (@JimFKenney) December 8, 2015 A reasonable position on DeSean Jackson, even a populist one, as is Kenney's declaration last week that he wants to delve deeper into Temple's campus stadium hopes, and whether a deal with the Eagles still could be viable. Does Temple president Neil Theobald care what you, or I, or those protesters kept out of his board meeting last week think of his plan to build a football stadium on campus?
NEWS
December 15, 2015
ISSUE | MOSQUE ATTACK Sisters and brothers It was with profound sorrow that I read of the desecration of the sacred mosque of the Al Aqsa Islamic Society by a cowardly and ignorant person last week ("Pig's head left at N. Phila. mosque," Tuesday). I have attended interfaith worship services and been joyfully received as a guest at the breaking of the Ramadan fast there. I have personally experienced these folks to be among the best of humankind. Our world and city would be diminished were they not among us. It is our duty and our obligation to protect them and their sisters and brothers in the Muslim community.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Susan Snyder and Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writers
Temple University postponed plans Tuesday to study building a $100 million football stadium on its North Philadelphia campus, following opposition from Mayor-elect Jim Kenney. Patrick O'Connor, chairman of Temple's board of trustees, said university officials would meet with Kenney and his team within the next week to talk about the university's interest in placing a 35,000-seat stadium at the northwest corner of campus. O'Connor's announcement came at a meeting of the trustees.
NEWS
November 4, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Not long after Camden schoolchildren chose a name for the unaffiliated minor-league team that would occupy a ballpark on the Delaware 15 years ago, a representative of the nearby aquarium informed the Daily News that "there really isn't anything called a river shark. " Now there isn't anything called the Riversharks either. The baseball team's departure for the bright lights of New Britain, Conn., after a singularly unsuccessful local run comes just as Temple University is readying the region's next plunge into big-time public subsidies for small-time sports.
NEWS
November 4, 2015
FORGET THE IDEA of a stadium. Temple University is in the unique position to establish a leadership role by rallying other colleges and universities to donate money to the struggling public schools. By passing on the stadium, Temple makes a powerful statement that can make a much larger impact in the lives of students on the playing field of "life. " By kick-starting a program, higher education in the city benefits on many levels. Peter Tobia Philadelphia Letter told a lie Lora Neal rants on about the Black Lives Matter movement mentioning all the familiar names, but that's what it is. Just rants.
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Freddie Bolden was doing what she always does on Tuesdays from her perch on West Norris Street: feeding the neighborhood. She placed several boxes of donated canned goods on two tables outside her rowhouse with the yellow-painted cracked steps. But now, a mere glance across the street prompted anger. Temple University wants to build a football stadium on her block. "Who wants to open their door and look at a stadium?" asked Bolden, who is 58 and called Mom Mom by the neighborhood children.
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