CollectionsStadium
IN THE NEWS

Stadium

NEWS
November 4, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Not long after Camden schoolchildren chose a name for the unaffiliated minor-league team that would occupy a ballpark on the Delaware 15 years ago, a representative of the nearby aquarium informed the Daily News that "there really isn't anything called a river shark. " Now there isn't anything called the Riversharks either. The baseball team's departure for the bright lights of New Britain, Conn., after a singularly unsuccessful local run comes just as Temple University is readying the region's next plunge into big-time public subsidies for small-time sports.
NEWS
November 4, 2015
FORGET THE IDEA of a stadium. Temple University is in the unique position to establish a leadership role by rallying other colleges and universities to donate money to the struggling public schools. By passing on the stadium, Temple makes a powerful statement that can make a much larger impact in the lives of students on the playing field of "life. " By kick-starting a program, higher education in the city benefits on many levels. Peter Tobia Philadelphia Letter told a lie Lora Neal rants on about the Black Lives Matter movement mentioning all the familiar names, but that's what it is. Just rants.
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Freddie Bolden was doing what she always does on Tuesdays from her perch on West Norris Street: feeding the neighborhood. She placed several boxes of donated canned goods on two tables outside her rowhouse with the yellow-painted cracked steps. But now, a mere glance across the street prompted anger. Temple University wants to build a football stadium on her block. "Who wants to open their door and look at a stadium?" asked Bolden, who is 58 and called Mom Mom by the neighborhood children.
SPORTS
October 30, 2015 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Sports Columnist
(Note: The dollar amounts cited in this story were acquired from official documents from the schools in question, including operating budgets, EADA disclosure forms, 990 forms, legislative reports, and board of trustee meeting materials.) THE QUESTION that we never seem to ask is why. We'll wonder whether Temple can continue to win football games without an on-campus stadium similar to those of its opponents. We'll wonder whether any of the university's students or alumni would object to the opportunity to eat, drink and cheer together six Saturdays a year.
SPORTS
October 26, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Earlier this month, I walked around the Lincoln Financial Field parking lot before Temple's game against Tulane, asking the Owls faithful whether they wanted an on-campus stadium or to stay at the Linc. I was surprised by how many - almost all - liked the idea of a campus stadium. Talking to season-ticket holders, parents of players, and former players, I found plenty of uniformity in their opinions. However . . . They diverged on sub-issues. On parking, for instance. Many agreed that is a tough obstacle on Temple's campus - "That's the tricky part," one man said.
NEWS
October 25, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University is three-quarters of the way to securing the funding needed to build a $100 million football stadium on campus, president Neil D. Theobald said Friday. And there's no question: He thinks the school should do it. The university, Theobald said, expects to receive $20 million in capital funding from the state that was dedicated by former Gov. Tom Corbett. Theobald said Gov. Wolf promised to honor that commitment, although a spokesman for Wolf's office on Friday said, "We have made no decisions about higher education capital projects.
SPORTS
October 24, 2015 | By Marc Narducci and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Temple's goal to build a football stadium on campus has received "some seven-figure commitments" for funding, the chairman of the university's board of trustees said Thursday. Chairman Patrick O'Connor confirmed that a proposed 35,000-seat stadium with an estimated cost of $100 million is being pursued for the northwest corner of campus. He said the issue is expected to be discussed at the December trustees meeting. "We are moving forward and exploring every option," he said. The stadium would rise about a block or two behind the Liacouras Center.
SPORTS
October 23, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
To say that Temple football has arrived is to assume that we knew exactly where it was supposed to be headed. This was surely a good week for a university that sacrificed five other sports (gymnastics, baseball, softball and indoor and outdoor track) in an effort to bolster its football program to the point where it will fuel public and trustee support for an on-campus stadium. When school administrators put head to pillow Sunday night, they did so with a football team that was ranked No. 22 in the Associated Press poll of writers and No. 24 in the coaches poll.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden Riversharks, the independent professional baseball team that has played at the city's waterfront Campbell's Field for 15 years, has ceased all operations, according to a statement from the team. "We would like to thank our partners and fans for supporting the club for 15 memorable seasons," reads the statement posted on the team website Wednesday. "We did everything we could to keep affordable, family entertainment alive and well in Camden. " Representatives from the Riversharks could not be reached, but the statement said the decision stemmed from "an inability" to reach an agreement on lease terms with the ballpark's owner, the Camden County Improvement Authority.
SPORTS
October 16, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Simulated crowd noise and music could be heard for blocks around Penn State's Lasch Football Building Wednesday evening. It emanated from the practice field, where the team was preparing for its toughest opponent yet. Penn State coach James Franklin said he wanted his players to be ready for the loud, hostile environment they would face come Saturday night, when the Lions take on top-ranked Ohio State in Columbus. And they're getting ready for more than just the noise during their prime-time clash with the Buckeyes - a game that Ohio State is billing as "The Dark Night at the Shoe.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|