CollectionsStadium
IN THE NEWS

Stadium

SPORTS
October 24, 2015 | By Marc Narducci and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
Temple's goal to build a football stadium on campus has received "some seven-figure commitments" for funding, the chairman of the university's board of trustees said Thursday. Chairman Patrick O'Connor confirmed that a proposed 35,000-seat stadium with an estimated cost of $100 million is being pursued for the northwest corner of campus. He said the issue is expected to be discussed at the December trustees meeting. "We are moving forward and exploring every option," he said. The stadium would rise about a block or two behind the Liacouras Center.
SPORTS
October 23, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
To say that Temple football has arrived is to assume that we knew exactly where it was supposed to be headed. This was surely a good week for a university that sacrificed five other sports (gymnastics, baseball, softball and indoor and outdoor track) in an effort to bolster its football program to the point where it will fuel public and trustee support for an on-campus stadium. When school administrators put head to pillow Sunday night, they did so with a football team that was ranked No. 22 in the Associated Press poll of writers and No. 24 in the coaches poll.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden Riversharks, the independent professional baseball team that has played at the city's waterfront Campbell's Field for 15 years, has ceased all operations, according to a statement from the team. "We would like to thank our partners and fans for supporting the club for 15 memorable seasons," reads the statement posted on the team website Wednesday. "We did everything we could to keep affordable, family entertainment alive and well in Camden. " Representatives from the Riversharks could not be reached, but the statement said the decision stemmed from "an inability" to reach an agreement on lease terms with the ballpark's owner, the Camden County Improvement Authority.
SPORTS
October 16, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - Simulated crowd noise and music could be heard for blocks around Penn State's Lasch Football Building Wednesday evening. It emanated from the practice field, where the team was preparing for its toughest opponent yet. Penn State coach James Franklin said he wanted his players to be ready for the loud, hostile environment they would face come Saturday night, when the Lions take on top-ranked Ohio State in Columbus. And they're getting ready for more than just the noise during their prime-time clash with the Buckeyes - a game that Ohio State is billing as "The Dark Night at the Shoe.
SPORTS
October 1, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oct. 8 dawned wet and gloomy, weather befitting the shabby ballpark in which Game 1 of the 1915 World Series was about to take place. The 2 p.m. matchup between the Red Sox and host Phillies would not sell out and as game time neared, scalpers outside Baker Bowl and at busy Center City intersections dropped their prices below face value. One New Yorker, stuck with $200 worth of unsold tickets, complained that he "couldn't give them away". There were a few prominent faces among the 19,343 fans who did have tickets, like actor George M. Cohan and ex-heavyweight champ James J. Corbett.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2015 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, Inquirer Staff Writer eichelm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5909
FIFTY-THREE thousand people packed Lincoln Financial Field last night, and it wasn't for the Birds. It was for North Philadelphia-born-and-raised comedian Kevin Hart, who became, according to his people, the first stand-up comedian to sell out a football stadium. The show was the culmination of Hart's "What Now Tour," which has been called the most successful comedy tour in history. Hart's jaunt began in April, and included three sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden among other storied halls.
SPORTS
July 2, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Craig Angelos believes his expertise in building a football stadium and in fund-raising will benefit him in his new job as Temple's deputy director of athletics. Temple announced his hiring on Tuesday. Angelos comes from Florida International University, where he was the senior associate athletic director for revenue enhancement since June 2014. He has worked 24 years in intercollegiate athletics administration. When Angelos served as director of athletics at Florida Atlantic University from 2003 to 2012, he led the effort to build a 30,000-seat football stadium that opened on campus in 2011.
NEWS
June 2, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
Police questioned the operator of a drone spotted flying briefly above the third-base gate at Sunday's Phillies game at Citizens Bank Park. No charges were filed. The incident occurred about 4 p.m. when Phillies security staff saw the drone, said Sal DeAngelis, the team's director of security. DeAngelis said it was unclear how high the drone went but it was easily visible to security personnel who were standing at the third-base gate. It did not reach airspace over the field, he said, or disrupt the game.
SPORTS
April 17, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The successor to the House That Ruth Built may not be ideally suited for soccer. At least not for the players. It's a place where they have little room to roam. As scenic as the new Yankee Stadium may be, the dimensions of the field - it's the smallest in Major League Soccer - have forced the Union to alter their practice methods in preparation for their game there Thursday against New York City FC. The Union's home field, PPL Park in Chester, is 120 by 75 yards. Yankee Stadium's is 110 by 70. That might not sound like much of a difference, but it is to the Union.
SPORTS
January 5, 2015 | Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
AKRON, Ohio - As Temple nears a decision on an on-campus football stadium, it might want to look toward this tired industrial city 350 miles to the west, where the University of Akron struggles to fill and pay for one that debuted five years ago. Akron, like Temple, is a large urban university transitioning from commuter-school roots. In 2009, to jump-start a long-stagnant football program and an apathetic fan base, it opened a 27,000-seat facility near the heart of its 222-acre downtown campus.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|