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NEWS
August 31, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / TED HORODYNSKY
This weekend will be a moving experience for the New Jersey Legislature. With their quarters nearly completed, lawmakers and their partisan staffs are starting to set up shop in the new legislative wing of the Statehouse, renovated to the tune of $90 million, including an addition for the staffs. For the last five years they have been working out of the Statehouse Annex.
NEWS
November 28, 1988
Remember the city budget deficit? It could be as high as $80 million this year. Remember the job freeze and the early retirement programs that were supposed to help reduce the red ink? Well, the freeze and early retirement programs are lowering employment levels in the Police, Fire and Streets departments, health centers, the parks and recreation programs. Elsewhere in city government - the mayor's office, anti-graffiti office, city solicitor's office, City Council - it's business as usual.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
Knight Ridder, the company that owns the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, yesterday announced plans to cut staff at most of its 32 daily newspapers. Tony Ridder, the company's chairman and chief executive officer, said he felt "we have no choice" because advertising revenue was falling while the cost of newsprint was increasing. "There will be reductions at most newspapers," Ridder said in a statement. "The number will vary according to local market conditions.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors, nurses and other hospital personnel throughout the country are becoming increasingly concerned that they might get AIDS from the blood of their patients. The signs of this concern are subtle, but they can be seen everywhere - especially on the maternity floors of inner-city hospitals. There, many of the patients are intravenous-drug users, and delivering babies is a bloody business. Consider a recent visit to the obstetrics service at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hospital, one of the busiest units in the city.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A worldwide effort to wring the fat out of U.S. military headquarters' staffs by eliminating several thousand troops and dozens of generals and admirals actually produced a few more members of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Two years ago, then-Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci ordered that 3,000 positions be cut, but when the military carried out that directive, three of the branches ended up with nine more positions than when they started, according to Pentagon documents recently released by Congress.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | BY DAVID S. BRODER
Last week, while members of Congress were spending the Independence Day holiday break taking soundings back home, there was no vacation for some of their staff employees. Those on the committees that had voted last month to send different versions of health legislation to the full House and Senate were working with leadership staff aides to prepare for the floor debate beginning later in July. It was - and is - a huge task. Four committees, two in the House and two in the Senate, cleared five different health-care measures - one of them preferring to approve two, rather than one. No two are identical and many have provisions that are flatly incompatible.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Dinner and drinks at Lorenzo's, a pricey Trenton watering hole that caters to lobbyists and government officials. Tickets to the Baltimore Orioles, the Mets and the Yankees. An expense-paid trip to a luxury Florida resort last October. Special interests, including hospitals, liquor companies, casinos and utilities, shelled out more than $117,000 last year to wine and dine lawmakers, their staffs and officials in the governor's office, according to a report released yesterday by New Jersey Common Cause.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse manager Pat Fetterman was asked to do two jobs for the salary of one after Mercy Haverford Hospital scaled back its workforce this spring. She now supervises a staff of 65 instead of 15. Randall Williams was relieved when he recently landed work as an emergency-room medical clerk after having been laid off twice in the last nine months from two other hospital jobs. He celebrated by filling up his refrigerator. And Sucorea VanBrunt searched for a job for six months before realizing she probably would not find another one in a hospital.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013
* Re: Frandsen delivers in a pinch (July 12): The Phils did not beat many good teams or pitchers the last two years. They have fattened up on all the mediocrity in MLB. 90% of RHoward's prodigious numbers over the years have come from AA and AAA callups, not legit #1's in anybody's rotation. If these guys can start beating the good staffs, we may have something here. The Cards' and Tigers' staffs will tell us a lot about this team the next 2 weeks. Mark1npt, Philly.com  
NEWS
June 29, 2010
WE DEFINITELY need term limits. Politicians get stale and feel like Tiger Woods - entitled to everything! And during a financial crisis like we are in now, we should be able to lay off City Council and their staffs. Council and their staffs should get minimum wage - they'll be working for the people, and with all the perks they get, they'll be just fine. Politicians argue that the salaries are needed to keep out corruption, but they get high salaries and are still corrupt. We need to stop voting for incumbents until they start serving us and not the special interests.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 11, 2014 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - As she faces a grand jury probe into alleged leaks, Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is once again reshuffling her top staff. On Tuesday, Kane named a former top aide to the Arkansas attorney general as her chief of staff. Kane also said she would be hiring a new communications director - her fourth top communications staffer in less than two years. According to Kane's office, Blake Rutherford will become chief of staff, a position that Kane's predecessors used but one she chose not to fill after taking office.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Coatesville Area School District has suspended its assistant superintendent and a custodial supervisor. Officials would not discuss the suspensions of the assistant superintendent, Angelo Romaniello, and supervisor Matt Como, but the moves come as the Chester County district continues to grapple with the fallout from investigations - both internally and by the district attorney - into its management. Romaniello served as interim superintendent last year after the resignation of Superintendent Richard Como in the wake of the discovery of racist and sexist text messages on his district-issued phone.
NEWS
November 16, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie's chief of staff, Kevin O'Dowd, will step down this month to work for Cooper University Hospital in Camden, nearly a year after the governor named O'Dowd his pick for attorney general. O'Dowd, whose selection as attorney general never moved forward after controversy arose over lane closures on the George Washington Bridge, will serve as senior executive vice president and chief administrative officer at Cooper, where he will focus on business development, Christie officials said.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Gov.-elect Tom Wolf has named a former state environmental protection secretary as his chief of staff. In his first appointment since winning election, Wolf said Kathleen "Katie" McGinty would be his top aide. McGinty, 51, of Wayne, was among three candidates who ran against Wolf in the Democratic primary. A graduate of St. Joseph's University, she served as the head of the environmental agency under Gov. Ed Rendell, and also held posts in the White House during the Clinton administration.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Rep. Chaka Fattah's new chief of staff comes from a familiar place. He is the former chief operating officer of a nonprofit that Fattah founded - and that federal prosecutors say was at the center of a scheme to help the congressman repay an illegal campaign loan. Fattah, a Philadelphia Democrat, said he hired Roger Jackson, whom he has known for close to 30 years, because he was "a great guy who has done extraordinary work for a number of organizations. " Among the groups Jackson has played a top role in was the Educational Advancement Alliance, a charity Fattah created to help boost educational opportunities among people in need.
SPORTS
October 2, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
PITCHING COACH Bob McClure, hitting coach Steve Henderson, bench coach Larry Bowa and the rest of the Phillies coaching staff will not be the scapegoats for a last-place season. The Phillies announced yesterday that all of the members of manager Ryne Sandberg's coaching staff have been asked to return for the 2015 season. Since the regular season does not begin for 6 months, that doesn't necessarily mean the 2014 staff will return in full for 2015. But apparently they've at least been tendered contracts for next season.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. Prota took the initiative once a year to round up clothes and boots that he and his coworkers at the Delaware River Port Authority no longer used and give them to the homeless people who often camped out under the Walt Whitman Bridge. Almost every day, especially during the colder months, he would also bring them food, such as soup, chocolate, coffee, and hot chocolate. "We're going to keep that tradition up in honor of Joe," a colleague, Frank Natanni, said Tuesday. "He was an all-around great guy Mr. Prota, 59, of Williamstown, died Thursday, Sept.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard Pagan ran down an Adventure Aquarium ramp to see the crocodiles. Naequan Rivera played doctor on a large teddy bear. Allysa Lesher chatted with nurses about college. All that seemed impossible for the three South Jersey youths not so long ago. All were trauma victims whose lives were saved by quick-acting doctors and nurses at Cooper University Hospital. Richard, Naequan, and Lesher joined nearly 20 other children and their families Saturday at Cooper Hospital's Celebrate Life event at Adventure Aquarium.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Auxilium Pharmaceuticals Inc., a Chesterbrook-based drugmaker that sells testosterone-replacement and other treatments for men with erectile-dysfunction issues, says it has cut 30 percent of its staff and consolidated its three sales forces into two. The company said it hopes the cuts will save $75 million a year so it can speed development of therapies for other conditions. "Auxilium has faced significant challenges this year, in particular a dramatic decline in the testosterone-replacement therapy market," chief executive officer Adrian Adams said in a statement.
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The secretary of the embattled Department of Veterans Affairs came to Philadelphia on Friday, touring VA facilities, chatting with employees, and taking a closed-door meeting with members of Congress. Secretary Robert McDonald took only a few questions and said his visit was a routine stop, pegged to the 100th anniversary of the agency's life insurance program. But it also follows months of scrutiny of the city's VA system, capped last week when local administrators came under fire for a training manual that appeared to depict their clients as Oscar the Grouch.
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