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NEWS
August 31, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / TED HORODYNSKY
This weekend will be a moving experience for the New Jersey Legislature. With their quarters nearly completed, lawmakers and their partisan staffs are starting to set up shop in the new legislative wing of the Statehouse, renovated to the tune of $90 million, including an addition for the staffs. For the last five years they have been working out of the Statehouse Annex.
NEWS
November 28, 1988
Remember the city budget deficit? It could be as high as $80 million this year. Remember the job freeze and the early retirement programs that were supposed to help reduce the red ink? Well, the freeze and early retirement programs are lowering employment levels in the Police, Fire and Streets departments, health centers, the parks and recreation programs. Elsewhere in city government - the mayor's office, anti-graffiti office, city solicitor's office, City Council - it's business as usual.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
Knight Ridder, the company that owns the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, yesterday announced plans to cut staff at most of its 32 daily newspapers. Tony Ridder, the company's chairman and chief executive officer, said he felt "we have no choice" because advertising revenue was falling while the cost of newsprint was increasing. "There will be reductions at most newspapers," Ridder said in a statement. "The number will vary according to local market conditions.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors, nurses and other hospital personnel throughout the country are becoming increasingly concerned that they might get AIDS from the blood of their patients. The signs of this concern are subtle, but they can be seen everywhere - especially on the maternity floors of inner-city hospitals. There, many of the patients are intravenous-drug users, and delivering babies is a bloody business. Consider a recent visit to the obstetrics service at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hospital, one of the busiest units in the city.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A worldwide effort to wring the fat out of U.S. military headquarters' staffs by eliminating several thousand troops and dozens of generals and admirals actually produced a few more members of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Two years ago, then-Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci ordered that 3,000 positions be cut, but when the military carried out that directive, three of the branches ended up with nine more positions than when they started, according to Pentagon documents recently released by Congress.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | BY DAVID S. BRODER
Last week, while members of Congress were spending the Independence Day holiday break taking soundings back home, there was no vacation for some of their staff employees. Those on the committees that had voted last month to send different versions of health legislation to the full House and Senate were working with leadership staff aides to prepare for the floor debate beginning later in July. It was - and is - a huge task. Four committees, two in the House and two in the Senate, cleared five different health-care measures - one of them preferring to approve two, rather than one. No two are identical and many have provisions that are flatly incompatible.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Dinner and drinks at Lorenzo's, a pricey Trenton watering hole that caters to lobbyists and government officials. Tickets to the Baltimore Orioles, the Mets and the Yankees. An expense-paid trip to a luxury Florida resort last October. Special interests, including hospitals, liquor companies, casinos and utilities, shelled out more than $117,000 last year to wine and dine lawmakers, their staffs and officials in the governor's office, according to a report released yesterday by New Jersey Common Cause.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse manager Pat Fetterman was asked to do two jobs for the salary of one after Mercy Haverford Hospital scaled back its workforce this spring. She now supervises a staff of 65 instead of 15. Randall Williams was relieved when he recently landed work as an emergency-room medical clerk after having been laid off twice in the last nine months from two other hospital jobs. He celebrated by filling up his refrigerator. And Sucorea VanBrunt searched for a job for six months before realizing she probably would not find another one in a hospital.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013
* Re: Frandsen delivers in a pinch (July 12): The Phils did not beat many good teams or pitchers the last two years. They have fattened up on all the mediocrity in MLB. 90% of RHoward's prodigious numbers over the years have come from AA and AAA callups, not legit #1's in anybody's rotation. If these guys can start beating the good staffs, we may have something here. The Cards' and Tigers' staffs will tell us a lot about this team the next 2 weeks. Mark1npt, Philly.com  
NEWS
June 29, 2010
WE DEFINITELY need term limits. Politicians get stale and feel like Tiger Woods - entitled to everything! And during a financial crisis like we are in now, we should be able to lay off City Council and their staffs. Council and their staffs should get minimum wage - they'll be working for the people, and with all the perks they get, they'll be just fine. Politicians argue that the salaries are needed to keep out corruption, but they get high salaries and are still corrupt. We need to stop voting for incumbents until they start serving us and not the special interests.
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NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The law firm hired by Gov. Christie to investigate the lane closures at the George Washington Bridge released more than 400 pages of documents Monday that describe in detail interactions among the governor's aides as the controversy over the closures unfolded. The documents - summaries of 75 interviews conducted by Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher - do not appear to contain new revelations about the controversy. The interviews, which formed the basis of the firm's report clearing Christie and his senior staff of wrongdoing in the lane closures, include accounts of tense staff meetings and frustrations about former aides implicated in the scandal.
SPORTS
April 11, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
TORONTO - Now that the 76ers' season is winding down, with only four more games remaining, plans for the future need to be made. Players will head home for some much-needed rest and, according to coach Brett Brown, so will he and his coaching staff. "Everybody has got to take a deep breath and go with their families and relax," said Brown, himself planning to go and coach his son's team in San Antonio at season's end. "I'm just so grateful for the work that my assistants have put in. We've all tried to maintain a positive outlook on what we knew would happen this year.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTER UPLAND The Chester Upland School District is laying off nine administrative staff members as part of an effort to reduce a $20 million spending gap, officials said Wednesday. "Given the deficit we face and mandates to rightsize the administrative staff, we have no choice but to reduce the staff size," said state-appointed receiver Joe Watkins, who has been charged with implementing a recovery plan for the ailing Delaware County district. The cuts, which the district had first said would affect 10 employees, will save $1.4 million in next year's $125 million budget.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | BY MIKE KERN, Daily News Staff Writer kernm@phillynews.com
UNTIL YESTERDAY, there was no record of any former Temple football player returing to his alma mater to become a full-time assistant coach. Adam DiMichele can now say he's the first. The former Owls quarterback joined Matt Rhule's staff a year ago as a graduate assistant working with offensive coordinator Marcus Satterfield and was a big help with the development of true freshman QB P.J. Walker. He's been promoted to wide receivers coach. "[This] is well-deserved," Rhule said.
SPORTS
January 29, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles filled out their coaching staff on Monday, finalizing the hire of Bill Musgrave as quarterbacks coach, the promotion of Mike Dawson from defensive quality control coach to assistant defensive line coach, and the addition of Michael Clay in Dawson's former role. The Inquirer reported the Musgrave and Dawson moves last week. Musgrave replaces Bill Lazor, who was hired as the Miami Dolphins offensive coordinator. Dawson replaces Erik Chinander, who was hired by Oregon as a defensive assistant.
SPORTS
January 26, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - As he formally introduced the nine assistant coaches who will make up his staff at Penn State for his first season, head coach James Franklin declared Friday that there are "no returning starters at any position. " OK, maybe one definite returning starter; quarterback Christian Hackenberg is as close as a college player can get to being the franchise. New offensive coordinator John Donovan likes what he has seen on film from an athlete who threw for 2,955 yards and 20 touchdowns last season as a true freshman.
SPORTS
January 24, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
LAKEWOOD, N.J. - There was no eight-person delegation from Philadelphia that flew to Los Angeles for the purpose of wooing Masahiro Tanaka. The Yankees, armed with $175 million, sent their executives to persuade the Japanese pitcher, while the Phillies stood on the periphery. Ownership authorized Ruben Amaro Jr. to pursue Tanaka, and the Phillies general manager engaged the righthander's agent in cursory negotiations. International scouting director Sal Agostinelli and Pacific Rim scout Steve Cohen watched Tanaka pitch and filed reports that labeled him a No. 2 or No. 3 starter in the majors - in other words, a perfect fit for this team.
SPORTS
January 15, 2014 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Larry Johnson, the longest-tenured assistant coach in the Penn State football program and one of the nation's top recruiters, has turned down an offer by new head coach James Franklin to be on his staff and will leave the Nittany Lions, the Harrisburg Patriot-News reported Monday night. Johnson, 61, who spent 18 years at Penn State as an assistant, the last 14 as defensive line coach under Joe Paterno and Bill O'Brien, said he twice met with the new boss and was told he could continue in his position, the newspaper said.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Holiday time for many of us still is book-giving time. So the call goes out - and people are really pounding me, assistant books editor, for recommendations. What's good? What do you recommend? Old, new, no matter? Why should I do all the work, though? Luckily, the Inquirer staff is full of readers, folks of discrimination and taste, of course. Here are their recommendations. Most prices are for hardbacks (but we know plenty of folks giving e-books). There's something below for almost any bibliophile, for Christmas or any other time.
SPORTS
December 5, 2013 | BY STEPHEN PIANOVICH, Daily News Staff Writer pianovs@phillynews.com
STATE COLLEGE - Just days after Penn State's final game of 2013, two members of Bill O'Brien's coaching staff are no longer with the program. Long-tenured linebackers coach Ron Vanderlinden and quarterbacks coach Charlie Fisher resigned from Penn State "to pursue other opportunities," the team announced last night. Rumors of the coaches' depatures surfaced Monday afternoon. "I appreciate all of Ron and Charlie's hard work and thank them for their dedication and service to Penn State," O'Brien said in a news release.
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