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NEWS
August 31, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / TED HORODYNSKY
This weekend will be a moving experience for the New Jersey Legislature. With their quarters nearly completed, lawmakers and their partisan staffs are starting to set up shop in the new legislative wing of the Statehouse, renovated to the tune of $90 million, including an addition for the staffs. For the last five years they have been working out of the Statehouse Annex.
NEWS
November 28, 1988
Remember the city budget deficit? It could be as high as $80 million this year. Remember the job freeze and the early retirement programs that were supposed to help reduce the red ink? Well, the freeze and early retirement programs are lowering employment levels in the Police, Fire and Streets departments, health centers, the parks and recreation programs. Elsewhere in city government - the mayor's office, anti-graffiti office, city solicitor's office, City Council - it's business as usual.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
Knight Ridder, the company that owns the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, yesterday announced plans to cut staff at most of its 32 daily newspapers. Tony Ridder, the company's chairman and chief executive officer, said he felt "we have no choice" because advertising revenue was falling while the cost of newsprint was increasing. "There will be reductions at most newspapers," Ridder said in a statement. "The number will vary according to local market conditions.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors, nurses and other hospital personnel throughout the country are becoming increasingly concerned that they might get AIDS from the blood of their patients. The signs of this concern are subtle, but they can be seen everywhere - especially on the maternity floors of inner-city hospitals. There, many of the patients are intravenous-drug users, and delivering babies is a bloody business. Consider a recent visit to the obstetrics service at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hospital, one of the busiest units in the city.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A worldwide effort to wring the fat out of U.S. military headquarters' staffs by eliminating several thousand troops and dozens of generals and admirals actually produced a few more members of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Two years ago, then-Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci ordered that 3,000 positions be cut, but when the military carried out that directive, three of the branches ended up with nine more positions than when they started, according to Pentagon documents recently released by Congress.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | BY DAVID S. BRODER
Last week, while members of Congress were spending the Independence Day holiday break taking soundings back home, there was no vacation for some of their staff employees. Those on the committees that had voted last month to send different versions of health legislation to the full House and Senate were working with leadership staff aides to prepare for the floor debate beginning later in July. It was - and is - a huge task. Four committees, two in the House and two in the Senate, cleared five different health-care measures - one of them preferring to approve two, rather than one. No two are identical and many have provisions that are flatly incompatible.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Dinner and drinks at Lorenzo's, a pricey Trenton watering hole that caters to lobbyists and government officials. Tickets to the Baltimore Orioles, the Mets and the Yankees. An expense-paid trip to a luxury Florida resort last October. Special interests, including hospitals, liquor companies, casinos and utilities, shelled out more than $117,000 last year to wine and dine lawmakers, their staffs and officials in the governor's office, according to a report released yesterday by New Jersey Common Cause.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse manager Pat Fetterman was asked to do two jobs for the salary of one after Mercy Haverford Hospital scaled back its workforce this spring. She now supervises a staff of 65 instead of 15. Randall Williams was relieved when he recently landed work as an emergency-room medical clerk after having been laid off twice in the last nine months from two other hospital jobs. He celebrated by filling up his refrigerator. And Sucorea VanBrunt searched for a job for six months before realizing she probably would not find another one in a hospital.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013
* Re: Frandsen delivers in a pinch (July 12): The Phils did not beat many good teams or pitchers the last two years. They have fattened up on all the mediocrity in MLB. 90% of RHoward's prodigious numbers over the years have come from AA and AAA callups, not legit #1's in anybody's rotation. If these guys can start beating the good staffs, we may have something here. The Cards' and Tigers' staffs will tell us a lot about this team the next 2 weeks. Mark1npt, Philly.com  
NEWS
June 29, 2010
WE DEFINITELY need term limits. Politicians get stale and feel like Tiger Woods - entitled to everything! And during a financial crisis like we are in now, we should be able to lay off City Council and their staffs. Council and their staffs should get minimum wage - they'll be working for the people, and with all the perks they get, they'll be just fine. Politicians argue that the salaries are needed to keep out corruption, but they get high salaries and are still corrupt. We need to stop voting for incumbents until they start serving us and not the special interests.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
September 16, 2016 | By Drew Lazor, For The Inquirer
'I think anyone who works in restaurants has a love-hate relationship with it in general," Gianna Lozzi says. "Everybody likes to complain about it, but there's a reason none of us ever leave. " Lozzi, a Girard Academic Music Program graduate with a theater degree from Arcadia University, has always had a passion for stagecraft, and for the years she has logged in restaurants. She explores the relationship between her interrelated vocations with her new original play, Right Behind , debuting Thursday at Connie's Ric-Rac as part of the 2016 Fringe Festival.
NEWS
September 9, 2016 | By Colt Shaw, Staff Writer
ANGLING TO reconcile budgetary constraints with a high payroll, Penn State University is offering voluntary retirement packages or buyouts to more than 1,200 faculty and staff members. The university said 340 of the targeted employees work on campuses other than the main one in State College, and 590 are academic faculty. Those choosing to accept the buyout must do so by Sept. 30. The plan, outlined in a letter sent to staff last week, will help the school community become "active in addressing budgetary and ongoing workforce challenges," president Eric Barron said in a statement.
NEWS
September 3, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
William V. Myers, 86, of North Cape May, a former AT&T staff manager who was an active member of his church congregation, died of Parkinson's disease on Tuesday, Aug. 30, at his home. At St. John Neumann parish in North Cape May, Mr. Myers served Communion at Sunday Masses and worked as an altar server at weekday funerals there. He had organized a group of six men who took turns each day of the week, as altar boys and girls do at Sunday Masses, his wife, Eleanor, said. Mr. Myers helped organize the parish's Holy Name Society, she said, and from 2005 to 2010 he was a member of the parish's financial committee.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
Radial, the $1.3 billion (yearly net sales), King of Prussia-based online-retail and logistics firm, says it's scrambling to find 20,000 temporary workers to staff its warehouses in Kentucky and other states, as part of the industry's Christmas-season buildup. That's a one-third boost over last year's holiday hiring, said Stefan Weitz, Radial's chief product and strategy officer. And it's getting tougher to find people: "We're seeing low unemployment causing us challenges, and pressure from competition," including Amazon.com.
NEWS
August 24, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The state's head of child welfare has called on the Philadelphia Department of Human Services to reduce staff to further shift resources to private contractors who now handle the frontline casework. He also warned officials to expect a second provisional license when the first expires in November. The city was issued a six-month provisional license in May after the state found 71 violations of state child welfare laws. Ted Dallas, secretary of the state Department of Human Services, said that since the next inspection is scheduled for October - three weeks into the tenure of the city department's incoming commissioner - the provisional license will likely continue.
NEWS
August 23, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Marquis Weeks, a retired NFL running back, calls his new job as the head football coach at Conestoga High School a "dream come true. " But allegations of hazing and assault that rocked his alma mater last year - and ultimately led to his hiring - have been an ongoing nightmare for one of the nation's most highly ranked school districts. His predecessor resigned in March, and the entire coaching staff was ousted, after the Chester County district attorney charged three senior football players with assaulting a 14-year-old freshman player in the locker room.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Latest in an occasional series about recruiters When the big gong sounds at Klein Hersh, it means an oncologist or tumor immunologist or gene-therapy researcher will soon have a new job. And, likely as not, it will be a job in some other city. "Talent is being incubated here, and then it's leaving," said Jason Hersh, a managing partner at the Horsham recruiting firm started by family friends. They were the ones who instituted the morale-boosting sounding of a big Chinese gong when a recruiter found the right person to fill a company's hiring needs.
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | By Aubrey Whelan, Staff Writer
Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams apologized to his staff Friday for any distractions created by the "adverse publicity" that has surrounded his disclosure of thousands of dollars in previously unreported gifts. "I understand and recognize that each of you works very hard to represent the commonwealth with integrity and honor," he wrote in an email obtained by the Inquirer and Daily News. "The adverse publicity about me during this past week has likely made it more difficult for you to do that.
SPORTS
August 8, 2016 | By Zach Berman, STAFF WRITER
Doug Pederson stood with the quarterbacks, Duce Staley with the running backs, Greg Lewis with the wide receivers, and Tim Hauck with the safeties. It wasn't a game from the Andy Reid era or a reunion of Eagles alumni, but instead an Eagles practice last week. When the Eagles hired Pederson as head coach in January, owner Jeffrey Lurie emphasized that Pederson is a former player with an understanding of the city and the franchise. When Pederson assembled his coaching staff, those qualities were coveted assets.
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