CollectionsStaffs
IN THE NEWS

Staffs

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / TED HORODYNSKY
This weekend will be a moving experience for the New Jersey Legislature. With their quarters nearly completed, lawmakers and their partisan staffs are starting to set up shop in the new legislative wing of the Statehouse, renovated to the tune of $90 million, including an addition for the staffs. For the last five years they have been working out of the Statehouse Annex.
NEWS
November 28, 1988
Remember the city budget deficit? It could be as high as $80 million this year. Remember the job freeze and the early retirement programs that were supposed to help reduce the red ink? Well, the freeze and early retirement programs are lowering employment levels in the Police, Fire and Streets departments, health centers, the parks and recreation programs. Elsewhere in city government - the mayor's office, anti-graffiti office, city solicitor's office, City Council - it's business as usual.
NEWS
April 28, 2001 | by Chris Brennan Daily News Staff Writer
Knight Ridder, the company that owns the Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, yesterday announced plans to cut staff at most of its 32 daily newspapers. Tony Ridder, the company's chairman and chief executive officer, said he felt "we have no choice" because advertising revenue was falling while the cost of newsprint was increasing. "There will be reductions at most newspapers," Ridder said in a statement. "The number will vary according to local market conditions.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | By Donald C. Drake, Inquirer Staff Writer
Doctors, nurses and other hospital personnel throughout the country are becoming increasingly concerned that they might get AIDS from the blood of their patients. The signs of this concern are subtle, but they can be seen everywhere - especially on the maternity floors of inner-city hospitals. There, many of the patients are intravenous-drug users, and delivering babies is a bloody business. Consider a recent visit to the obstetrics service at the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hospital, one of the busiest units in the city.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A worldwide effort to wring the fat out of U.S. military headquarters' staffs by eliminating several thousand troops and dozens of generals and admirals actually produced a few more members of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps. Two years ago, then-Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci ordered that 3,000 positions be cut, but when the military carried out that directive, three of the branches ended up with nine more positions than when they started, according to Pentagon documents recently released by Congress.
NEWS
July 13, 1994 | BY DAVID S. BRODER
Last week, while members of Congress were spending the Independence Day holiday break taking soundings back home, there was no vacation for some of their staff employees. Those on the committees that had voted last month to send different versions of health legislation to the full House and Senate were working with leadership staff aides to prepare for the floor debate beginning later in July. It was - and is - a huge task. Four committees, two in the House and two in the Senate, cleared five different health-care measures - one of them preferring to approve two, rather than one. No two are identical and many have provisions that are flatly incompatible.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Dinner and drinks at Lorenzo's, a pricey Trenton watering hole that caters to lobbyists and government officials. Tickets to the Baltimore Orioles, the Mets and the Yankees. An expense-paid trip to a luxury Florida resort last October. Special interests, including hospitals, liquor companies, casinos and utilities, shelled out more than $117,000 last year to wine and dine lawmakers, their staffs and officials in the governor's office, according to a report released yesterday by New Jersey Common Cause.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1996 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nurse manager Pat Fetterman was asked to do two jobs for the salary of one after Mercy Haverford Hospital scaled back its workforce this spring. She now supervises a staff of 65 instead of 15. Randall Williams was relieved when he recently landed work as an emergency-room medical clerk after having been laid off twice in the last nine months from two other hospital jobs. He celebrated by filling up his refrigerator. And Sucorea VanBrunt searched for a job for six months before realizing she probably would not find another one in a hospital.
SPORTS
July 14, 2013
* Re: Frandsen delivers in a pinch (July 12): The Phils did not beat many good teams or pitchers the last two years. They have fattened up on all the mediocrity in MLB. 90% of RHoward's prodigious numbers over the years have come from AA and AAA callups, not legit #1's in anybody's rotation. If these guys can start beating the good staffs, we may have something here. The Cards' and Tigers' staffs will tell us a lot about this team the next 2 weeks. Mark1npt, Philly.com  
NEWS
June 29, 2010
WE DEFINITELY need term limits. Politicians get stale and feel like Tiger Woods - entitled to everything! And during a financial crisis like we are in now, we should be able to lay off City Council and their staffs. Council and their staffs should get minimum wage - they'll be working for the people, and with all the perks they get, they'll be just fine. Politicians argue that the salaries are needed to keep out corruption, but they get high salaries and are still corrupt. We need to stop voting for incumbents until they start serving us and not the special interests.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 28, 2016 | By Ellen Dunkel, STAFF WRITER
Change is constant in the dance world. But the suddenness and scope of the roster changes announced Monday for Pennsylvania Ballet stunned many in that world and out of it. Angel Corella, the company's artistic director and an international ballet superstar, said 17 of 43 dancers - nearly 40 percent - would be leaving the company. Twelve were let go and five are leaving on their own, including favorites such as Lauren Fadeley, who is going to to Miami City Ballet as a soloist; and Elizabeth Mateer, who will be joining the corps of the San Francisco Ballet.
SPORTS
April 25, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
Jerad Eickhoff was three years removed from being a 15th-round pick and even further from being considered a prospect. The pitcher was instead a middling minor-leaguer, struggling to find success on baseball's lowest rungs. Then, in the summer of 2014, he struck up a conversation with Mark Connor, a roving pitching instructor in the Texas Rangers' farm system. Connor told Eickhoff to throw his curveball more. He believed that American League pitchers who offered a heavy dosage of curveballs were more likely to succeed.
SPORTS
March 26, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
For Bishop Eustace catchers, hitting is optional. Defense and leadership are mandatory. That's fine with Crusaders senior catcher Nate Steele. He has embraced his role for a young team with a staff of inexperienced pitchers. "As a catcher, that's how it works at Eustace," Steele said. Bishop Eustace coach Sam Tropiano "doesn't even care about how much you hit. You have to be a leader. " Steele batted a respectable .293 with seven doubles, two homers and 19 RBIs as a junior for a team that won 25 games and finished in the No. 1 spot in the Inquirer's Top 25. Steele had two of those RBIs in Bishop Eustace's victory over Eastern in the Joe Hartmann Diamond Classic championship game.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Mike Sielski, and Laura McCrystal, STAFF WRITERS
Officials of a Main Line school district said Thursday that they had removed the entire Conestoga High School football coaching staff, and that the head coach had resigned, after an internal investigation showed that players had routinely hazed teammates for years. "The locker rooms had an insufficient adult presence throughout the football season, creating an environment where hazing activities could occur," Tredyffrin/Easttown district officials said. Football coach John Vogan, who also coached baseball, resigned effective immediately, the district told parents in a letter Thursday.
SPORTS
February 16, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
AT 27, JOE D'ORAZIO is mature beyond his years. He's already coached alongside Andy Reid here and in Kansas City, been part of former Penn coach Al Bagnoli's staff at Columbia. He's already parlayed his experience as the center on Penn's successful football program of the late last decade and lifelong passion for the game into a diverse coaching portfolio that includes working with receivers and tight ends, special teams, defense and now, as Eagles coach Doug Pederson's offensive quality control and assistant wide receivers coach.
SPORTS
February 9, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
The texts come in. Villa assistant coach Baker Dunleavy usually notices them right after a game, after he grabs his phone in the locker room. "He just can't help himself during a game," Dunleavy said of the texter. "He's a junkie, a basketball addict. " The texter used to coach the Lakers and then the Trail Blazers and then the Clippers, but now Mike Dunleavy has time to watch one of his sons, Mike, play in the NBA and another one, Baker, work as Jay Wright's top Villanova assistant.
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
Independence Blue Cross has begun moving staff of its AmeriHealth Administrators subsidiary from two suburban offices into the newly renovated 1900 Market St. office building in Center City. The staffers were relocated from Horsham and Fort Washington to the building that "better reflects and supports AHA's collaborative culture and accommodates future growth," Independence spokeswoman Elizabeth H. Sell said Friday in a statement. The insurance provider now occupies 113,000 square feet of the 228,000 square feet that it plans to fill at the building, according its owner Brandywine Realty Trust.
SPORTS
January 19, 2016
NOT EVEN an hour after his Chiefs fell in New England, incumbent Eagles head coach Doug Pederson moved to flesh out his staff. The obvious goal: Familiarity and experience. With only seven seasons as an NFL assistant, the first two spent as a 41-year-old intern, it is fair to question Pederson's bona fides as a coach. Considering his wish list, it is hard to question Pederson's strategy as a hirer. He clearly wants to insulate himself with loyal, accomplished men. A league source said Sunday that, if he has his way, Pederson's chief lieutenants will include a former teammate and two former NFL head coaches who, like Pederson, owe their NFL careers to Andy Reid.
SPORTS
January 2, 2016 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - The sidelines and the seats in the Georgia coaches' booth will look significantly different Saturday when the Bulldogs take on Penn State in the TaxSlayer Bowl. A multitude of coaching changes began the day after Georgia's 13-7 victory over Georgia Tech in its final game of the regular season. Mark Richt, the Bulldogs' head coach for 15 seasons, was fired with the intention that he would coach in the bowl game, but he changed his mind after being introduced Dec. 4 as the new head coach at Miami.
SPORTS
December 31, 2015 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Maggie Lucas leaped to her feet as the tenor of the game changed. She said "Let's go," clenched her fists, and followed with three forceful claps. The Germantown Academy girls' basketball team was within three points. It was the type of enthusiasm and intensity one has come to expect from Lucas, in her first year as an assistant for the Patriots. It's the type of demeanor people first became familiar with when Lucas was herself playing for GA, netting 2,197 points from 2006 to 2010.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|