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Stage Fright

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
Stage fright. It can hit a violinist so that his bow arm shakes and his heart pounds so hard that it drowns out the notes. It can hit a brass player so that he hyperventilates until his mouth is dry, or a speechmaker so that the firmness goes out of his voice or he drops the pages of his speech. Vladimir Horowitz, whose piano career of nearly seven decades has defied the odds, fights stomach convulsions before every recital. In some cases, severe performance anxiety can be so debilitating that it cuts short a career.
NEWS
March 25, 2003 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With his thumbs hooked in jeans pockets and his hips swiveling like Elvis', 10-year-old Alex Lesse sang and wiggled his way to acclaim in the annual talent show at the Pathway School in West Norriton. Lesse, who has a brain disorder, belted out the Disney song "Bare Necessities" as a standing-room-only crowd of parents, teachers and students roared with delight. "Look for the bare necessities, the simple bare necessities. Forget about your worries and your strife. " The lyrics flowed smoothly from the stage.
SPORTS
April 18, 1996 | By Ray Parrillo, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Upstairs in the lounge area at Twin Rinks in Pennsauken, Tampa Bay general manager Phil Esposito was playing table hockey, laughing at his successes, cursing his failures. Down at ice level, Lightning coach Terry Crisp was telling war stories about his playing days 20 years ago with the Flyers' back-to-back Stanley Cup championship teams, and saying how it was good to spend a few days with old friends from the Philadelphia area. He was imitating the way Fred Shero, the enigmatic character who coached those Flyers teams, used to push his rose-colored glasses from the tip of his nose.
NEWS
February 26, 1995 | From Inquirer wire services
British actor Stephen Fry said Friday that he mysteriously pulled out of a West End play and disappeared last week because of stage fright. "I'm afraid I suffered a dreadful attack of what golfers call the yips and actors call stage fright and I slunk away rather than cause a scene in public," he said in a faxed statement to his agent, Lorraine Hamilton. Fry, 37, best known as the unflappable butler in the television series Jeeves and Wooster based on the P.G. Wodehouse novels, bolted from the Simon Gray play Cell Mates just three days after it opened.
NEWS
November 17, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Anything but a white gown. That was 15-year-old Brittany Edelman's prerequisite when selecting her formal attire for the Miss Pennsylvania Teen USA competition, scheduled for late this month. She was worried it would get dirty or collect hairs from her Rottweiler, Gus. Yet, despite her fears, a white, full-skirted gown hangs in her bedroom closet in a protective cover. She fell in love with it as soon as she tried it on. If only she can shake another concern so easily - stage fright.
LIVING
September 13, 1993 | By Matthew Hoffman, FOR THE INQUIRER
When Michael Kozak was a doctoral student studying anxiety, he needed to make people nervous - very nervous - in the laboratory. So he told them to make speeches. "That's a pretty sure-fire way of doing it," said Kozak, now an associate professor of psychiatry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania. "It didn't matter that they weren't getting graded, that their life did not rise and fall on this thing and that the audience was only three or four people that they didn't know and wouldn't see again.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012
IN THE AGE of Netflix, watching films can be a solitary pastime. Cinema 16 aims to make it a shared, engaging affair, and one that can never be experienced the same way twice. Tonight three silent, avant-garde films will be screened at International House, accompanied by a live performance of an original score. In previous incarnations, Cinema 16 musicians have ranged from an experimental cello player to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. And the films have ranged from the 1920s to the 1980s, making each evening wildly different from the previous one. Cinema 16 is named for the post-World War II film society created by Amos Vogel in the West Village.
NEWS
May 26, 2001 | By William R. Macklin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jean McKelvey Harland, 81, whose intense bouts of stage fright did not prevent her from becoming a prolific and versatile player in local theatrical productions, died May 18 of cancer at the Mount Airy home where she had lived for 46 years. During an acting career that began when she was a stagestruck student at Germantown High School, Mrs. Harland worked in early television, had roles in commercials and independent films, and appeared on screen, ever so briefly, in the movie Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1997 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
You might have heard more engaging folk at a coffeehouse than Friday at the Painted Bride, where Suzzy Roche gave a sparsely attended concert. One of the three harmonizing Roche sisters, Suzzy (rhymes with "fuzzy") has gone solo on her recent Red House Records release, Holy Smokes. It's a collection of 12 bland acoustic songs that wander with the Roches' quirkiness but none of their charm. That sums up Suzzy's stage act as well. Alone, her voice is average - she needs the sweet harmonies of her siblings to be interesting.
NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Maureen Maloney, Special to The Inquirer
Eita Long, 63, of Medford, an actress who appeared in many Philadelphia- area stage productions during the 1970s and 1980s, died Friday at her home after a long battle with cancer. A native of Chicago, where she studied at the University of Chicago School of Acting and with the Second City theater company, she moved to southern New Jersey in 1970 when her husband, Louis, was transferred to Philadelphia. Mrs. Long appeared in more than 60 plays during her career. She preferred avant garde theater, and her favorite role was the mother in an early 1980s Philadelphia Theater Company production of True West.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
WHERE'S EVERYBODY GOING? A longtime victim of crippling social anxiety, New Kids on the Block 's Jonathan Knight left the stage when the group performed in New York last week. About 25 minutes into the show, Knight was supposed to solo on the new ballad "Survive You," but he couldn't get the words out. Donnie Wahlberg kidded him about the silence, and then Knight laughed and walked off. NKOTB finished the song and the show without him. Knight tweeted "I'm sorry . . . " soon thereafter.
NEWS
March 22, 2013
By Megan Ritchie My daughter, 27 weeks in the oven, enjoys giving her mother a few swift kicks when she thinks I've forgotten she's there. New ligaments stretch over bone, muscles fuse, and nerve connections spark into being: Her movements are indicative of healthy growth, and I cherish them. My bladder does not, but we can't all be happy. I noticed early on that her movements quieted significantly when my hand, or anyone else's, was placed on my belly. I initially took it as stage fright (which she absolutely did not inherit from me)
NEWS
February 3, 2013 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Going to see an artist who has had the words paralyzing stage fright written next to her name as many times as Cat Power - the stage name of the singer Chan Marshall - can be a perilous proposition. Would Marshall make it through the show? How was the 41-year-old indie chanteuse coping after being dumped by Giovanni Ribisi and canceling a number of fall shows (including one at the Electric Factory) due to financial and medical troubles? Did she really cut off her long, dark tresses, dye her hair blond, and fashion it into a Mohawk?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2012
IN THE AGE of Netflix, watching films can be a solitary pastime. Cinema 16 aims to make it a shared, engaging affair, and one that can never be experienced the same way twice. Tonight three silent, avant-garde films will be screened at International House, accompanied by a live performance of an original score. In previous incarnations, Cinema 16 musicians have ranged from an experimental cello player to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. And the films have ranged from the 1920s to the 1980s, making each evening wildly different from the previous one. Cinema 16 is named for the post-World War II film society created by Amos Vogel in the West Village.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Scares the hell out of you. Those are words seldom associated with Albert Boscov. Albie? Yes. Mr. B? That, too. Even force of nature , for how he saved his family's department store chain, and thousands of jobs, from near-death bankruptcy three years ago. But his being scared ? Nah. Yet as the 82-year-old merchant-warrior sat still for just a few moments in his Reading office the other day - paperwork on the floor, paperwork on the conference table, a shrinking birthday balloon barely floating above his desk - he used those very words to describe the tumble of emotions associated with Sunday's planned opening of a Boscov's at Monmouth Mall near Asbury Park, N.J. "It scares the hell out of you that it won't work," Boscov said, eyeing a 68-page draft of an advertising circular.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I was out to dinner with my mom a few nights ago, and we were seated at a table next to a middle-aged couple. I was facing the husband and noticed immediately after sitting down that he was staring at me. I thought perhaps I knew him, so I glanced over and realized he was staring directly at my chest! I am busty, but I wasn't wearing a low-cut shirt. This man continued to blatantly stare at my chest and look me up and down for the next 20 minutes, until he left. I even made eye contact with him at one point and gave him a disgusted look, but that did nothing.
SPORTS
February 18, 2011 | By BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
You would never know it now, but Elvis Presley was so painfully shy as a young man, he suffered from stage fright in his early career. But what if he hadn't conquered his fear of performing? Maybe Elvis never would have become the "King of Rock 'n' Roll," but rather just another truck driver warbling along to songs on the radio as he made his deliveries. It's the same in any public arena. Heavyweight Jesse "Thunder" Ferguson was a terror in the gym, regularly giving Mike Tyson fits in sparring.
NEWS
January 26, 2008 | By Gordon Forbes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jan 25, 1982 PONTIAC, Mich. - The amazing San Francisco 49ers achieved the biggest halftime lead, the longest touchdown drive and the two quickest scores in Super Bowl history yesterday in the Silverdome. And then they they almost blew it. Quarterback Joe Montana, who had a great first half and a mediocre second half, won the Most Valuable Player award. But the 49ers survived to edge the Cincinnati Bengals, 26-21, in an entertaining Super Bowl XVI because of other talents.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2004 | HOWARD GENSLER gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
TRY TO CURB your enthusiasm, but Jerry Seinfeld hinted on "Extra" last night that he's talking to NBC about a possible return to television. Seinfeld, the father of a girl and boy, says his new comedic inspiration is his family. "Kids and wives are the ultimate comedy," he says. "I just sit in my house and write and watch these people and the insane things they do. " The Seinfeld interview will continue tonight. Should a new Seinfeld sitcom get off the ground, word is that NBC wants to take no chances with its success and would like Jerry's children played by Julia-Louis Dreyfus and Jason Alexander.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2003 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A&E is working on a TV movie about America's first Govinator. See Arnold Run, a biopic about Arnold Schwarzenegger's gubernatorial campaign and equally issues-driven 1973 quest to become Mr. Olympia, is set to be shown next summer. It is billed as "an exploration of Arnold the public figure versus Arnold the private man, told through a blend of drama, comedy and satire. " Didn't we just see that on CNN? No word on casting. Luther's recovery Luther Vandross is talking - and singing again.
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