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Staircase

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NEWS
March 18, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
John Pappas, 81, who founded a stair-building company in Bucks County, died of heart-related problems Tuesday at his Pipersville home. After serving in the military, Mr. Pappas went to work for his father at N.J. Pappageorge Co. in Philadelphia and learned the staircase-building trade. Later, he worked for Yeager Co., a lumber yard in Philadelphia's Germantown section, and then founded John Pappas & Son, a Plumsteadville, Bucks County, company. At the time of his death, he was helping his son Mark in that field.
REAL_ESTATE
October 15, 1995 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Northampton Ridge, Richboro, Bucks County The ups and downs of real estate are taking on new forms . . . as second sets of stairs (known as privacy staircases) are gaining in popularity. These stairs from the kitchen or family room to the second floor are standard in four of five designs at Northampton Ridge. Each of the 38 spacious houses planned for Northampton Ridge will have 3,100 to 3,700 square feet of living space, and all will include a first-floor study in addition to a family room (four models have a cathedral ceiling)
LIVING
April 7, 2000 | By Michael Walsh, FOR THE INQUIRER
Staircases, enclosed for much of the last half of the 20th century, are coming out of hiding, often sweeping grandly upward from just inside the front door. Their return as a major interior architectural element, not just a utilitarian one, is welcome. Inevitably, though, homeowners will learn that the finish on hardwood stairs won't last as long as the finish on hardwood floors. Wood steps and risers alike are subject to more abuse than floors. More pressure is applied to the tread surface when stepping up or down than when walking on a floor.
LIVING
January 13, 1995 | By Gene Austin, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Going around in circles can make good sense, if you're on a spiral staircase. Spiral stairs are a compact and often highly decorative way to get from one floor of a building to another. "Typically, you save 40 square feet of space," Allen Cohen, vice president of the Iron Shop in Broomall, said of the advantage over a conventional straight stairway. The Iron Shop is one of the nation's largest manufacturers of spiral stairs. That 40 square feet is a 5- by 8-foot space - enough to make a medium-sized room spacious or to add a walk-in closet or powder room.
NEWS
April 10, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff
The three members of the Black Flag Family gang - including a former volunteer firefighter - knew exactly what they were doing when they allegedly tried to burn down a 237-year-old piece of Bucks County history, police said Tuesday. Fortunately, they didn't succeed. While the interior of the unique Croydon Lodge - once home to a Revolutionary War-era British officer - is damaged, the outside of the structure is still sound, said Bob Pritz, president of Holland Enterprises, a developer.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | DAVE MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
A man descends the winding staircase in the northeast quadrant of City Hall yesterday afternoon, sheltered from temperatures that topped out at a chilly 46 degrees. It will be cloudy today and milder.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
My husband insists it was the staircase that convinced him we needed to live in the quirky old English Tudor that needed a ton of work and years of TLC. For me, it also was the staircase. So grand. Such beautiful wood! And even though they were only in elementary school when we moved there in 1973, I could already imagine our daughters walking down that staircase as brides - which they did. But, first, there were other memories of that staircase, not nearly as glorious or sentimental.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Sometimes a single part of an architectural design can explain the whole. At Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation, the building's entire aesthetic sensibility is summed up by a humble staircase tucked off to the side of the lobby. Unlike the grand flights of steps in a big art palace, the purpose of the Barnes stairwell is more functional than ceremonial: transporting visitors from the main floor to the amenities on the lower level. But like the rest of the understated Barnes, the stairs also are packed with quiet theatrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1998 | By Patricia Brennan, WASHINGTON POST The New York Daily News contributed to this report
On Sunday, CBS will tell the story of what some people in Santa Fe, N.M., believe to be a miracle: the construction of an unsupported circular staircase in the Sisters of Loretto Chapel by a mysterious carpenter who, upon completing the job about 1878, disappeared without collecting his pay. The coiled staircase, which makes two turns between the Gothic chapel's floor and its choir loft, is made of wood that is still unidentified. Built without nails or center support, it is an engineering and architectural wonder that attracts thousands of visitors each year.
NEWS
April 29, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in the early 1970s, travelers in West Germany driving the autobahn between Munich and Nuremberg were treated to a peculiar sight outside the refinery town of Ingolstadt: a four-story set of concrete stairs that rose out of the ground and led nowhere. Presumably a surrounding structure was to be built, but, for several years at least, none was. That image came to mind yesterday at Simpson House Retirement Home, Belmont Avenue and Edgely Drive, where a three-story wooden balustraded staircase will be one of the items sold at an auction today of architectural objects and furniture, beginning at 10 a.m. You could only assume that the successful bidder would have to assemble the staircase on-site and put up a suitable building around it. The staircase is being removed as part of a modernization and expansion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
My husband insists it was the staircase that convinced him we needed to live in the quirky old English Tudor that needed a ton of work and years of TLC. For me, it also was the staircase. So grand. Such beautiful wood! And even though they were only in elementary school when we moved there in 1973, I could already imagine our daughters walking down that staircase as brides - which they did. But, first, there were other memories of that staircase, not nearly as glorious or sentimental.
NEWS
October 19, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Sometimes a single part of an architectural design can explain the whole. At Philadelphia's Barnes Foundation, the building's entire aesthetic sensibility is summed up by a humble staircase tucked off to the side of the lobby. Unlike the grand flights of steps in a big art palace, the purpose of the Barnes stairwell is more functional than ceremonial: transporting visitors from the main floor to the amenities on the lower level. But like the rest of the understated Barnes, the stairs also are packed with quiet theatrics.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The three members of the Black Flag Family gang - including a former volunteer firefighter - knew exactly what they were doing when they allegedly tried to burn down a 237-year-old piece of Bucks County history, police said Tuesday. Fortunately, they didn't succeed. While the interior of the unique Croydon Lodge - once home to a Revolutionary War-era British officer - is damaged, the outside of the structure is still sound, said Bob Pritz, president of Holland Enterprises, a developer.
REAL_ESTATE
April 1, 2013 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Marie Lynch and her husband, Jay, live in Media in a 4,500-square-foot, center-hall Colonial, complete with portico, butterfly staircase, a kitchen designed for Italian cooking and Irish entertaining, and a master-bedroom closet with enough floor space to open a 7-Eleven. But they might still be living in their much-smaller Colonial in West Whiteland, Chester County, if an 18-wheeler hadn't demolished the car her son Stephen was riding in on the Ohio Turnpike one Friday night 17 years ago. He died then and there.
REAL_ESTATE
February 17, 2013 | By Sally Downey, For The Inquirer
Sixteen years ago, Louise Fischer and Tony Perez purchased a stone Tudor in Roxborough. With the sale came a bin of blueprints and three bound volumes chronicling the 1920 construction of the house. The archival material confirmed that beneath shag carpets and lime-green paint was a home with elegant bones. In 1997, Fischer was living in a new townhouse in Andorra and shopping for a place with character she could share with Perez, who loved old homes. Her daughter, Lisa Santoro, had found a prospect on Green Lane.
REAL_ESTATE
October 22, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
With its portico with fieldstone columns and its peaked roof buttressed with hand-sawn logs, its staircase made from log spindles and its chandelier adorned with moose and bears, the decor of Eagle Claw Cabin might suggest a dark hunting lodge in the Adirondacks. Instead, the cabin is a light-filled vacation home at Lake Naomi in the Poconos. Owners Rich and Sue Kratzinger have balanced rustic details with attention to scale and touches of whimsy, including a charming sleep nook for their granddaughters.
REAL_ESTATE
August 23, 2009 | By Sally Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Paul Vosbikian was driving down a familiar street in Moorestown with his wife when he spotted a sale sign on a corner ranch house. He slowed down because it happened to be in the exact neighborhood where his parents and sister had homes. "I looked at the house and the lot, and especially at the backyard, which was wonderful. And I immediately said to my wife, 'We could make this work,' " he said. "I know it sounds a bit impulsive, but that's really the moment when we realized this might just be the house for us. " That was in 2002, just a few years after the couple had moved to a townhouse in a newer area of Moorestown.
NEWS
January 14, 2007 | By Chris Satullo
The French call it l'esprit d'escalier. "Staircase wit. " The phrase refers to the witty comeback, the rapier riposte that only occurs to you long after you needed it, when you're halfway down the stairs, heading home. I've been on that damned staircase, twitching with self-loathing, for a week or so now. This is my exorcism. On Jan. 4, my wife and I went to see the show This Is the Week That Is at a little theater on Sansom Street. We sat with my pal Dick Polman (the political columnist)
LIVING
December 15, 2006 | By Marni Jameson FOR THE INQUIRER
A few years ago, I went to a salon to get my hair done for my brother's wedding. As the stylist was creating the "updo," she said, "My goal is to make your hair look like you did it yourself. " "Excuse me?" I thought. "Then why am I paying you?" I didn't say that because I learned long ago never to insult your waitress, dentist or hairstylist. They get the last laugh. However, I can't think of anything, save maybe a pie, that I'd like to have look homespun. I understand that achieving an effortless, not-too-contrived look is an art. But there's a fine line between a natural hairstyle and a heron's nest.
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