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Stand Up Comedy

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NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By William B. Collins, Inquirer Theater Critic
Only Kidding! is a play in three scenes about comics who aren't very funny. Is that part of the joke? Yes, in the first scene. In the second, I wasn't sure. And the payoff that comes in the third is no gag at all, but a depressing comment on show business as a killing ground. The author, Jim Geoghegan, put in eight years working clubs and colleges. He appeared at New York's Improvisation. I don't know how good he was, but he is clearly familiar with the life. He knows what a seedy existence is like on the way up or on the way down.
NEWS
August 10, 2008 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Actor and comedian Bernie Mac, 50, who won acclaim and affection as the goggle-eyed grump with the wise heart, died yesterday in Chicago of complications from pneumonia, his publicist Danica Smith said in a statement. Whether doing stand-up comedy, television or movies, Mr. Mac knew how to get the attention of an audience. He was a star among a new generation of African American comedians, featured with D.L. Hughley, Steve Harvey and Cedric the Entertainer in Spike Lee's 2000 documentary, The Original Kings of Comedy.
NEWS
September 28, 2003 | By Phil JoyceFOR THE INQUIRER
Jim Burke was nervous. He's relatively new to this stand-up comedy business, and he saw that the audience was mostly women at the church group's monthly meeting. "Some of these jokes are geared to a male audience," said the resident of LeisureTowne, the adult community in Southampton, Burlington County. "I don't know how it's going to go over with these gals. " There were maybe a half-dozen men in an audience of about 60. So, he started off with the broom joke: The female broom goes up to the male broom and says, "I got news for you, we're going to have a whisk broom.
NEWS
August 29, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Abbie Hoffman insists his New York stand-up comedy debut tonight is serious. As serious as throwing dollar bills on the American Stock Exchange floor. As serious as plotting to spike the punch at a White House party with LSD. As serious as writing a book titled "Steal This Book. " Also as serious as getting arrested at the 1968 Democratic convention in Chicago, at the Point Pleasant pump project in Bucks County and at any number of anti-CIA events. "I never considered funny to be the opposite of serious," said Hoffman.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Chuck Darrow, For the Daily News
John Oliver. Amy Schumer. Chris Rock. These were just some of the prominent names floated in winter 2015 after the announcement that Jon Stewart was retiring as host of Comedy Central's satirical news program The Daily Show . But it wasn't a comedy A-lister who ultimately got the gig. Instead, Trevor Noah, a relatively unknown stand-up comic from South Africa, assumed the daunting task of filling Stewart's seemingly unfillable shoes....
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
Brian Regan is a road warrior, a stand-up comedian who has built a dedicated fan base by touring rather than starring in a sitcom or movie. He likes performing live so much, his latest stand-up special, Brian Regan: Live From Radio City Music Hall , was shown in real time on Comedy Central last year. Listen to his stand-up, and his appeal is readily apparent. He's funny, self-deprecating, and enormously clever, taking observational humor in different directions. We talked with Regan in advance of his Saturday show at the Merriam Theater.
NEWS
March 13, 1992 | by Diane Joy Moca, Los Angeles Daily News
A quarter-century ago, comics were nothing more than filler between other types of performers. Today, stand-up comedians have found their own spotlight - on television. They can be seen nearly any time of the day in more than 17 regular series devoted strictly to stand-up comedy. Despite the fact that comedy clubs have "lost business in the last two years, I think stand-up comedy is really still booming," said Andrew Dice Clay, star of "Andrew Dice Clay - For Ladies Only," which debuts tomorrow at midnight on "HBO Comedy Hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
At 18, Douglas is handsome, athletic, and passionate about sports. He plays on his school's football and basketball teams, and he hopes to be a professional hoops star one day. He also enjoys softball and soccer and has participated in seasonal leagues in both sports. But his interests do not end there. He also likes stand-up comedy. "I laugh when something is funny," he says. Enrolled in 12th grade, Douglas receives special education services and benefits from the small class size and individual attention.
NEWS
April 13, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bottles of baby formula have replaced bottles of beer in the crowds laughing at Margie Cherry's stand-up comedy routine. The Havertown comedian and illustrator abandoned a short-lived nightclub career three years ago and found a daytime audience of Philadelphia-area mothers. With drawings, observations and jokes about husbands who "can't see past the first layer of food in the refrigerator," the material in her Mom's Comedy Workshop is tailored to the newfound crowd. But even in the nursery atmosphere, Cherry's delivery and timing are as smooth as those of a comedy-club regular.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Five hundred people were cursing and screaming for her to get off the stage. That's when Mary Frances Connelly knew for sure she was a stand-up comic. "I was bombing badly in front of a bunch of drunk college kids trying to humiliate me," she said of the hellish 30-minute act at a Delaware nightclub nearly four years ago. "They sensed I couldn't control the crowd. When that happens it's over. " Connelly of Wynnewood and Chris Coccia of Paoli are two of 30 comedians who will do an abbreviated act as part of a "laugh-off" competition sponsored by the Comedy Cabarets, a chain of eight nightclubs that has given Delaware Valley jokesters a place to sink or swim.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
Brian Regan is a road warrior, a stand-up comedian who has built a dedicated fan base by touring rather than starring in a sitcom or movie. He likes performing live so much, his latest stand-up special, Brian Regan: Live From Radio City Music Hall , was shown in real time on Comedy Central last year. Listen to his stand-up, and his appeal is readily apparent. He's funny, self-deprecating, and enormously clever, taking observational humor in different directions. We talked with Regan in advance of his Saturday show at the Merriam Theater.
NEWS
April 21, 2016 | By Chuck Darrow, For the Daily News
John Oliver. Amy Schumer. Chris Rock. These were just some of the prominent names floated in winter 2015 after the announcement that Jon Stewart was retiring as host of Comedy Central's satirical news program The Daily Show . But it wasn't a comedy A-lister who ultimately got the gig. Instead, Trevor Noah, a relatively unknown stand-up comic from South Africa, assumed the daunting task of filling Stewart's seemingly unfillable shoes....
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
At 18, Douglas is handsome, athletic, and passionate about sports. He plays on his school's football and basketball teams, and he hopes to be a professional hoops star one day. He also enjoys softball and soccer and has participated in seasonal leagues in both sports. But his interests do not end there. He also likes stand-up comedy. "I laugh when something is funny," he says. Enrolled in 12th grade, Douglas receives special education services and benefits from the small class size and individual attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | BY REBECCA BORISON, Daily News Staff Writer borisor@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
WHAT DO YOU do when you're an Ivy Leaguer who's halfway through law school and you realize that it's just not for you? Go into comedy. That's what comic Demetri Martin decided to do. How it worked out will be on display Wednesday when he performs two sold-out shows at the Helium Club. Martin had a full ride to New York University Law School in 1995 after graduating from Yale University with a degree in history, but just a month or two into the first year, "I realized I didn't want to pursue law," he recalled in an interview this week.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Sandy Cohen, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Phyllis Diller, 95, the housewife turned humorist who aimed some of her sharpest barbs at herself, punctuating her jokes with her trademark cackle, died Monday morning in her Los Angeles home. "She died peacefully in her sleep and with a smile on her face," her longtime manager, Milton Suchin, told the Associated Press. Ms. Diller, who suffered a near-fatal heart attack in 1999, was found by her son, Perry Diller. The cause of her death has not been released. She was a staple of nightclubs and television from the 1950s - when female comics were rare indeed - until her retirement in 2002.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2011
BRIAN McKIM doesn't profess to be a prophet, but he can claim co-authorship of the Bible. The Pennsauken native and his wife and fellow stand-up comic, Traci Skene, have written The Comedy Bible: The Complete Resource for Aspiring Comedians , which the Barron's imprint will release Oct. 1. According to McKim, who performs today through Thursday at the Comedy Club inside the Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa, the book "has elements of a textbook, but...
NEWS
August 10, 2008 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Actor and comedian Bernie Mac, 50, who won acclaim and affection as the goggle-eyed grump with the wise heart, died yesterday in Chicago of complications from pneumonia, his publicist Danica Smith said in a statement. Whether doing stand-up comedy, television or movies, Mr. Mac knew how to get the attention of an audience. He was a star among a new generation of African American comedians, featured with D.L. Hughley, Steve Harvey and Cedric the Entertainer in Spike Lee's 2000 documentary, The Original Kings of Comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2008 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bill Maher has fresh meat. Maher, who once called himself the "godfather" of political satire, doesn't get many opportunities to do stand-up comedy. So, it's a rare treat when he hits the road. On a summer break from Real Time With Bill Maher on HBO, the humorist will appear Saturday night at the Borgata in Atlantic City. "I haven't done much stand-up since I did The Decider, an HBO special, last July," Maher said. "I don't like to do the same jokes people have already seen.
NEWS
January 1, 2008 | Reviewed by Levi Asher, For The Inquirer
Born Standing Up A Comic's Life By Steve Martin Scribner. 207 pp. $25 Many comedians have written memoirs, but few have risked much in the effort. It's all too easy to package a stage routine into a book, slap on a grinning front-cover portrait and a catchy one-word title (Seinlanguage, Fatherhood) and hope nobody remembers hearing the same funny stories on The Tonight Show last year. But Steve Martin has never taken the easy way out, and his latest offering will be held to high literary standards by readers who have enjoyed his previous books.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
What James Brown is to soul, Robert Klein is to wry, intelligent comedy - the Godfather. Jump back and kiss yourself. Though the Bronx-born Klein got his chops doing improvisational comedy at Chicago's Second City and stand-up at New York's Improv, most audiences know of his literate observational aplomb and breathy musical interludes through his HBO specials. In fact, he was the first comic to tackle the famed form in 1975, with a bit based on his Grammy-nominated album, Child of the '50s.
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