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BUSINESS
July 19, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Latte-lovers shuddered yesterday to hear Starbucks was closing nine of its 115 caf?s in the Philadelphia area among 600 nationwide. But, really, there was no need to panic. Where one Starbucks is going under, it seems, another is just around the corner. And another, and another, and another. Therein lies the problem that got Starbucks into this whole mess. The Seattle company that transformed coffee from a mud-slurping morning routine to a daily luxury indulgence is now closing a big batch of outlets to stem losses.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2007 | By Henry J. Holcomb INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Grasso, the Philadelphia real estate and business developer, is jumping into the red-hot gourmet-coffee boom with a milder, homier alternative to Starbucks. His firm, Walnut Street Capital, completed the purchase last week of Atlanta-based Saxbys Coffee Worldwide L.L.C. for an undisclosed price. Saxbys headquarters is moving to the Curtis Center, across from Independence Hall. Grasso and partners own the former headquarters of the Curtis magazine empire. He is building a mock-up coffee shop there, where dozens of managers and potential franchise owners will soon be trained each month.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2003 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cappuccino babes of the world - get naked. Playboy magazine plans to do a picture spread on the "Women of Starbucks," and is asking latte-makers from its more than 6,200 coffee shops worldwide to send in photos. Playboy's Theresa Hennessey said: "Starbucks is such a big part of American pop culture, and Playboy is always trying to stay on top of the latest trend, so it seemed like a natural fit . . . " Starbucks has not warmed to the idea of the joining of these two cultural colossi, saying that it does not endorse the nude-coffee-makers issue.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2008 | By Dan Lieberman and Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Cherry Hill Mall's $200 million makeover, while expected to boost the mall's appeal when finished, is taking a toll on merchants in the short run. Starbucks Corp. said yesterday it would close one of two sites there, and other merchants have noted a decline in shoppers. "Usually a lot of people walk around exercising in the morning," coffee drinker Ernie Alejo, sitting at the food court, said yesterday. "They stopped because of all the inside construction. A lot of things have closed.
NEWS
December 24, 2007 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
A glint of violence more common around stop-and-gos in the city's rough neighborhoods struck a busy Starbucks in South Philadelphia, where on Saturday, for no apparent reason, a man repeatedly stabbed a patron waiting for his order, including once in the face. Police said the 5:44 p.m. assault, which left the 29-year-old victim in critical condition yesterday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, remained under investigation. It was unclear whether the attack stemmed from an argument or was just an outburst by a deranged person.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1995 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Can this relationship be saved? Or is trouble brewing over a steamy . . . hot . . . cup of Starbucks coffee? His story: Whenever it's time to correct term papers, Temple religion prof David Watt parks himself in front of the big window at New World Coffee, where he can see Rittenhouse Square across Walnut Street. He grabs a cup of decaf latte and gets to work. "I bet my students get higher grades because I'm a happy guy," said the associate professor. Weekends, when his girlfriend, Laura Levitt, an assistant religion professor at Temple University, visits, they sit at New World, happy with the view, the coffee and each other.
NEWS
October 15, 2002 | By Amie Parnes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Even on a Monday night, in this quiet community far from city lights and thumping dance beats, there is a steady stream of people lured by that seductive mermaid on all those coffee cups. A man with slick, black hair wants one of those cups. Actually, two - one for him, and one for that blond he met over there. "Two doppio espresso macchiatos," he says at the counter of the Starbucks on State Street. "Tall. " "Tall" is Starbucks lingo that Tom Peters learned a few years back when the coffee chain opened a store in the borough, which has been transformed by coffee-sipping window-shoppers who linger late into the evening.
NEWS
September 20, 2013
AH, FALL: Time once again to rake the leaves, pull out the flannel and petition Starbucks for a vegan Pumpkin Spice Latte. Yes, this is a thing: Apparently the base syrup has condensed milk - never a secret, but suddenly, in its 10th year, the seasonal beverage has its own change.org petition. Will it spur Starbucks to change the recipe? Hey, who knows? The company did just that last year when people learned that the red coloring in one of its strawberry drinks was made from crushed bugs.
NEWS
December 16, 2004 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starbucks is easy to make fun of. It's ubiquitous, cookie-cutter corporate, and - now that your grandmother gets her coffee there - far from cool. They skewered it on The Sopranos, showing a mafioso so incensed by the perceived purloining of Italian cafe culture, he steals a Starbucks coffeepot. In the movie Best in Show, a couple describe how they met, first noticing each other as they sat in separate Starbucks stores across the street. But now a bespectacled Temple University researcher wants you to think about Starbucks in a different way. Hunkered down among the caffeine-jones-ing latte lappers, risking deafness from the airplane roar of the milk-foaming machinery, Bryant Simon sits alone with his Apple PowerBook G4, chronicling the Starbucks zeitgeist.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Starbucks? Or Three Beans? That is the question. For nearly nine years, two coffee shops have dominated and coexisted in Haddonfield. Each one thrives - booms, in fact. Yet, aside from one obvious similarity - both sell coffee - the shops are completely different. And each has a fiercely loyal clientele. Starbucks, in the center of town, at the corner of Haddon Avenue and Kings Highway, is one of 8,949 Starbucks worldwide, part of a chain that had revenues of $4 billion in 2004.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia police on Friday identified the woman accused of throwing coffee and punches at another woman outside a Center City Starbucks store in April. Yvonne Montgomery, 47, of Wyncote, Montgomery County, turned herself in to Central Detectives on May 24, about a month after police released video of the sidewalk attack. According to public records, Yvonne Barnes Montgomery is a partner at the Tucker Law Group, at 1617 John F. Kennedy Boulevard in Center City, around the corner from where the alleged attack occurred.
NEWS
January 24, 2016
Grande Mozart with a shot of Schubert? Starbucks is now offering music streaming via a deal with Spotify - classical music included. An app detects your location and serves up, to your cellphone, to listen to now or later, whatever tune is being played at the Starbucks nearest you. Starbucks has curated a special classical playlist, a company spokeswoman says. A recent sampling through Spotify reveals artists and repertoire much like Apple Music's classical Internet "radio" - Arvo Pärt choral music, a tasteful Richard Goode playing Bach partitas, Lang Lang feeling alternately irreverent and extravagant in a Mozart sonata.
NEWS
November 13, 2015
I SPENT A GOOD part of one afternoon this week making a parody of the whole "Little Red Cup" controversy. The most recent iteration of our annual "War on Christmas" outrage involved Starbucks and their holiday cups. Usually in the lead up to Thanksgiving, the company issued its festive cups adorned with wreaths and whatever else reminded you of the totally nonessential yet delightful parts of Christmas. There was no nativity motif, nothing religious. It was the secular part that makes you warm and fuzzy and coaxes you to pay exorbitant sums for, let's face it, not so good coffee.
NEWS
November 12, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I'VE BEEN HOLDING back a primal scream for days. If I don't let loose, I swear on all that's holy that my head is going to explode off my neck and destroy the holidays for my family. So here goes. Stop it, people. Just please, please, please stop it. I'm talking to you, coffee drinkers outraged that Starbucks coffee cups aren't "Christmassy" enough this year. If you need to sip your Peppermint Hot Chocolate Mocha Parsley With Salted Beef in a ceramic Baby Jesus mug shaped like a manger, go to the dollar store and buy one. That includes you, Donald Trump, with your call for a Starbucks boycott - which comes on the heels of your calls to boycott HBO, Scotland, Italy, Oreos and Chinese products (even though your signature Donald Trump ties are made in China)
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | BY JOE BRANDT, Daily News Staff Writer brandtj@phillynews.com, 215-854-4890
FOUR DAYS after a Philly cop posted an online rant about being denied access to a Center City Starbucks bathroom, the Seattle-based coffeehouse Goliath announced it had apologized to the officer. In a Facebook post that went viral last week, the unnamed sergeant said he entered the Starbucks in the Macy's building at 13th and Chestnut streets in full uniform and asked a "young blonde liberal" employee if he could have the key code for the coffee shop's bathroom. She told him the bathroom was for paying customers only and recommended a bathroom down the street.
NEWS
April 2, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a drug dealer tried to kill Benito Gonzalez in 2011, leaving him alive only because the gun jammed, the veteran Camden police officer began a downward spiral. Gonzalez, the decorated supervisor of the narcotics unit, said he drank heavily and became suicidal. Psychologists diagnosed post-traumatic stress disorder, according to medical evaluations provided by his attorney. One afternoon, before his three children returned home from school, Gonzalez said he took a gun out of a locked box, put it in his mouth, and nearly pulled the trigger.
NEWS
March 31, 2015 | BY LEONARD PITTS JR
AM I THE only person in America not making fun of Howard Schultz? The Starbucks CEO bought himself a ton of ridicule recently when he attempted to jumpstart a national dialogue on race by having baristas write the words "Race Together" on customers' cups of Cinnamon Dolce Light Frappuccino Grande or Caffe Misto Venti with extra coconut. On Twitter, the campaign was dubbed "patronizing," "absurd" and "a load of crap. " On "The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore," Rosie Perez said: "I don't want to be forced to have a conversation.
NEWS
March 27, 2015
ISSUE | MARKETING A grande win-win After Starbucks Coffee was criticized as being opportunistic for having baristas write race together on coffee cups, the company discontinued the practice ("Starbucks ends cup messages," March 23). But virtually all capitalist enterprise is inherently opportunistic. The green movement in marketing is one example. Companies employing the strategy are at least partly attempting to take advantage of customers' current environmental values to increase sales.
NEWS
May 22, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lieutenant who leads the narcotics unit of the Camden County Police Department has been suspended without pay after allegedly committing a lewd act while sitting inside a Starbucks in Cherry Hill. Benito Gonzalez Jr. of Sewell was charged by Cherry Hill police with a disorderly-persons lewdness offense in the May 7 incident. Police said Gonzalez pulled down his pants and exposed his genitals before touching himself at the Starbucks at 1192 E. Route 70. Camden County Police Chief Scott Thomson said Gonzalez, a 17-year veteran who transferred from the former Camden City department to the county department, has been suspended without pay. Gonzalez's salary is $104,070, county officials said.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2013 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coming soon to a Starbucks in New Jersey: Five guys huddled around a corner table with laptops open, playing poker online? That was a scenario discussed at an Internet gambling conference last month in Philadelphia. "You're going to have an informal clustering of people," Joe Brennan, former chairman of iMEGA, an online-gaming association, predicted at the World Regulatory Briefing. "That's natural social functioning," he said. Does that mean poker players and slots addicts will flood free public WiFi hot spots like Wegmans and Starbucks, now that online gambling is legal in New Jersey?
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