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Stars And Stripes

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NEWS
June 21, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The proper way to dispose of a flag when it is in poor condition is to burn it in a dignified manner.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | Inquirer photographs by Scott Rowan
With the flag wrapped in controversy this Fourth of July, Chester Countians seemed more eager than ever to fly the red, white and blue over the holiday. Old Glory cropped up in store windows and at flower shops. And many homeowners showed their true colors by displaying the stars and stripes.
NEWS
June 14, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Hinda Schuman
To commemorate Flag Day, which is today, the North Penn VFW Post held a ceremony in Glenside to show the proper way to dispose of Old Glory. The post collected 3,000 flags in poor condition that it will burn. Yesterday's event also featured rifle firings and a reading of the history of the national anthem. June 14 marks the day Congress adopted the Stars and Stripes as the nation's symbol.
NEWS
February 3, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
With the United States at war in the Persian Gulf, the flag-manufacturing business is booming. One area company that manufactures the Stars and Stripes is Collegeville Flag & Manufacturing, which employs 290 people. Orders for car antenna flags are especially on the rise. In addition to U.S. flags, POW- MIA flags, armed services flags - especially the Marines - and yellow- ribbon flags are enjoying popularity.
NEWS
September 29, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
While Taps played and the Stars and Stripes sank, more than 1,000 current and former Philadelphia Naval Shipyard workers stood at attention for the base's closing ceremonies Friday. "The shipyard was more than a job," said Dennis A. Cribben, a 31-year veteran who was its last controller. "It was a way of life. "
NEWS
July 26, 2002
CONQUER AND occupy the entire Middle East region. Nationalize all resources for the foreseeable future. Erect twin towers in Saudi Arabia. Fly the Stars and Stripes from one, and the Star of David from the other. The Axis blueprint for the occupation of Europe will do for policies and procedures. Our enemies, their families and associates have all this and more coming to them, as they have seen fit to annihilate our decent capacity to live and let live. Tom Jordan Philadelphia
NEWS
November 12, 1996 | Inquirer photographs by Tom Gralish
Yesterday, on a chill gray day punctuated with a smattering of snowflakes, the mournful sound of a lone bugler and the sight of somber-faced men waving the Stars and Stripes reminded passersby that it was Veterans Day. At the Vietnam Veterans Memorial near Penn's Landing and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier of the Revolutionary War in Washington Square, veterans and others gathered to pay tribute to those who have served and died in America's wars....
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | By Renee V. Lucas, Daily News Staff Writer
In the civilized world of yachting, winning the race is secondary only to being a good sport. In that spirit of good will, New Zealand, the sloop that challenged the victorious Stars and Stripes for the America's Cup earlier this year, is completing its stay at Penn's Landing this weekend - the last stop of an East Coast tour organized by the New Zealand Government and Trade Development Board. The 132-foot-long, 15-story-high "Big Boat" - the largest racing sloop built in more than 50 years - arrived Wednesday and will be on public display through tomorrow, its massive hulk completely out of the water and on a barge.
NEWS
August 21, 2001
YOUR editorial (July 19) was a slap in the face to veterans willing to make the supreme sacrifice to keep Old Glory waving proudly - and to those who did give their lives defending this symbol of freedom. If dimwitted idiots like you can write that garbage, they obviously died in vain. Unfortunately, your disgusting rhetoric is protected by the First Amendment. We should let our veterans - those guys who sat in foxholes, flew bombing missions, manned naval vessels and dodged hostile fire - deal with anyone who burns the Stars and Stripes.
NEWS
October 22, 2001
President Bush is wrapping his energy program in the Stars and Stripes and urging Americans to embrace it. Over-dependence on Middle East oil harms national security, he says, as he argues for opening Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling. If wisdom prevails, the Senate. . . will stand firm in protecting the refuge. Bush's energy program, passed by the House in August, focuses far too much on production and too little on conservation. It leans toward old solutions, awarding billions of dollars in subsidies and tax breaks to producers of oil, nuclear power and coal.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2015 | Lauren McCutcheon, Daily News Staff Writer
In these days of flag-related controversy, one thing's for sure: Old Glory, born in Philly, flying from poles and gates and kids' streamer-covered bikes from Old City to Sea Isle City, DelCo to the Poconos, is one banner we can all get behind. And if the Stars and Stripes are made of sugar and butter and other good stuff? All the better. Gus Isgro, of 111-year-old Isgro Pasticceria , at 10th and Christian streets, has been baking flag cakes since before the Bicentennial. His longtime favorite version is vanilla layer with strawberries or raspberries and white whipped cream or buttercream stripes, and a square of summer blueberries with whipped cream/buttercream stars.
SPORTS
November 6, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nerlens Noel remained as the first-unit center Tuesday when the 76ers returned to practice. In a 104-93 loss to the Houston Rockets on Monday, Noel slid from the power forward position to starting center because Henry Sims had an upper respiratory infection. Sims was healthy Tuesday, but he ran with the second unit during the team's practice in front of the troops at the McGuire Fitness Center at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst. "I'm personally in a mode where we can experiment with some things," coach Brett Brown said.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Casey Fabris, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lorie Surnitsky's husband likes to call her the flag police. She wouldn't go that far. But at 74, she's someone who still takes the time to look up at a flag and remember what it stands for. Two American flags in particular are hurting her sense of national pride. They fly on the 2100 Parkway Apartments on 21st and Winter Streets - a gateway, she says, to the historic city. And they're torn and tattered, barely recognizable, more like tissue paper than the Stars and Stripes.
NEWS
September 17, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHERRY HILL Nineteen thousand feet above sea level was far from the wet and wind where John MacCausland likes to play. But the champion sailboat racer from Cherry Hill had always wanted to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, just as he had set his sights for decades on another goal: the world championship in the Star class of sailboats. He had won 19 East Coast championships and six North American championships since he began racing Stars as a teenager. He even crewed on the America's Cup winner, Stars and Stripes, in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2013 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer takiffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5960
SUPPOSE WE threw a party and everyone came. That's the aim of the "America's birthday" celebration "Wawa Welcome America," which takes over Center City every July Fourth holiday week. This year, the dream could come true as never before. The talent lineup for the Philly 4th of July Jam on the Parkway extravangaza - billed as the "largest free concert in America" - is exceptionally strong, and the most contemporary and diverse in Welcome America history. We're talking John Mayer, J. Cole, Demi Lovato, Jill Scott, Ne- Yo, Grace Potter and Ben Taylor , with backing throughout by the Roots (who'll also get their own set)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Allie Caren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Remember when Independence Day was just that - a day? One that kicked off with Sousa bands and stirring orations, progressed through charred hot dogs, sunburns, and sparklers, and came too quickly to its razzle-dazzle end in the early night sky? Over the years, as American holidays are wont to do, the Fourth of July ballooned into the long weekend, and the even-longer weekend, until it became a mini-season crammed with more goings-on than Uncle Sam could shake his famous forefinger at. This year across the region, the nation's birthday celebrations - its 237th, arriving Thursday - will commence almost a week ahead, and last a good three days after.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Hurricane Sandy's hellacious rampage across the New Jersey shore, she destroyed homes, businesses, lives and dreams. And among the ravages, certainly not the most grave, but surely among the most weirdly beloved, was The Shack. "It's gone," said Chet Atkins, who owns the land where the revered, collapsing pile of sunbleached cedar and pine planks stood defiantly for decades. "I saw it with my own eyes. There are some pilings sticking out, but it's gone. " The small building had survived nearly 80 years on its sandy ground.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Stephen M. Walt
Like most of you, I'm spending some time these days watching the Olympics. It's especially fun to see more obscure sports like fencing, table tennis, and beach volleyball get their moments in the sun, and there are always a few upsets and feel-good stories to keep us riveted.   But given my day job as a professor, I can't help but see the Olympics as a sublime lesson in nationalism. Every Olympic year, I ask my students whether they get a subtle thrill when one of their countrymen wins or are disappointed when one loses.
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | By Rita Giordano
"I want to say, ‘Thank you for your service,'?" said Marissa Colbeck, 14. "?‘What you do is brave, and I wouldn't be all right without you, so thanks for taking care of us.'?" Said fellow eighth-grader Kevin Calhoun: "It's the least we can do. " What they did was pretty impressive. Right in time for Memorial Day, "Hearts for Heroes" was the name given to the effort organized by Patty Watson, a patriotic volunteer, mother and former nurse from near Buffalo, N.Y., who has a New Jersey connection.
NEWS
November 10, 2011 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
A LITTLE BOY in pajamas enters the living room where his parents are watching TV late at night and says, "I don't feel so good. I think I need a hug. " Is there a dry eye in the house? Bil Keane's famed comic feature "Family Circus" had many such tender moments, as the cartoonist sought to portray American family life as it is, or at least once was in more innocent times, over the 50 years it appeared in about 1,500 newspapers around the country. The little boy who needed a hug was patterned after Bil's son Jeff, who has been drawing the one-panel comic with his father's help for the last several years.
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