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NEWS
April 24, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A House panel, without debate, gave unanimous approval yesterday to legislation that would restrict smoking in state-owned buildings to specially designated areas. The bill, which now moves to the full House, would prohibit smoking in public areas of the state's legislative, executive and judicial offices, including such places as the Capitol Rotunda, meeting rooms and reception areas. The ban would not affect county Courts of Common Pleas or district justice offices, according to its sponsor, Rep. Kenneth J. Cole (D., Adams)
NEWS
December 13, 2001 | By Charles Dennis
Important legislation that was approved Monday by the Assembly and Senate and that would require the placement of defibrillators in state buildings could save an untold number of lives from sudden cardiac arrest. The American Heart Association has called sudden cardiac arrest a "major unresolved public health issue. " At least 220,000 Americans die from sudden cardiac arrest annually. We refer to sudden cardiac arrest as a "major unresolved public health issue" because the survival rate is barely 5 percent.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Cynthia Burton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former U.S. Rep. John Adler liked to watch silly movies, play catch, and attend his sons' sporting events. But the thing he enjoyed the most was family dinners, his sons Andrew and Oliver said at his funeral Wednesday. About 1,400 people, including his wife, Shelley, and other two sons, Jeffrey and Alex, packed Temple Emanuel in Cherry Hill. The synagogue filled to capacity a half hour before the service began, so the staff opened a chapel where mourners could watch the service on closed-circuit television.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
  Flags to be lowered to honor fallen Marine TRENTON - Gov. Christie has ordered flags at all state buildings to be flown at half-staff Friday to honor a fallen Marine corporal. The flags will be lowered in tribute to Derek Kerns, 21, of Woodstown, who was killed last week in a training mission in Morocco. Kerns joined the Marines in September 2008, shortly after he graduated from Woodstown High School. He was a MV-22 crew chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 261, Marine Aircraft Group 26MV-22, and was based at New River Air Station in North Carolina.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The state Capitol is finally going cold turkey. Smoke-filled back rooms will still be allowed, but starting tomorrow, puffing in public areas in the Capitol and other state buildings across Pennsylvania will be prohibited except in a few designated areas. The restrictions "are being implemented because of fire, safety, health and long-term facility maintenance concerns," said Gary E. Crowell, secretary of the Department of General Services. Department spokeswoman Julie E. Ohlson said Friday's edict had been in the works before a February fire in a building next to the Capitol that was caused by a smoldering cigarette butt.
NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Alex Wigglesworth, Staff Writer
Funeral arrangements have been set for a New Jersey state trooper killed in a one-car crash in Salem County on Thursday. The services for Trooper Eli McCarson, 30, will be held Wednesday at Rowan University's Pfleeger Concert Hall in Glassboro, state police said Saturday. A viewing is scheduled from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m., followed by a funeral at noon. McCarson will then be buried at a location that had not yet been disclosed Saturday. McCarson was on patrol when his car went off the right side of Quinton Alloway Road near Route 49 and struck a utility pole about 10:45 a.m. He was rushed to the Memorial Hospital of Salem County, where he died shortly after noon.
NEWS
November 21, 1989 | By Jodi Enda, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Inmates who set fire to buildings and tore through property during three days of rioting at the state prison at Camp Hill caused an estimated $15 million worth of damage, state officials said yesterday. It probably will be a year before reconstruction can begin on the 14 prison buildings that were destroyed - even under stepped-up, emergency procedures, said Pam DiSalvo, spokeswoman for the state Department of General Services. But as daunting as the job may seem, the state did get one break: Four months before the riots, the Casey administration decided to buy a new insurance policy to cover damage of $1 million or more to any state building.
NEWS
March 26, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro dropped a threat to tax the state after learning yesterday that the state erred when it said it would cut revenues the borough receives for hosting Glassboro State College. Municipalities traditionally receive money from the state in lieu of some of the real estate taxes that they are prohibited from collecting on state buildings within their town limits. Earlier this month, Glassboro received word from the state that those revenues - which last year amounted to $267,443 - would be cut by more than $47,000, to $219,121.
NEWS
January 2, 2010 | By Chelsea Conaboy INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some New Jersey business leaders are crying foul over legislative proposals that they say will cost the state money and jobs amid tough economic times, while proponents argue for needed cash in the pockets of low-wage workers. Four bills awaiting final votes during the Legislature's lame-duck session would extend wage laws to new sectors of the workforce, including school cafeteria workers, custodians at state buildings, and builders of affordable housing meant to be sold. Supporters say the changes would guarantee fair wages for people like Delores Jakob of Lumberton, known as "Miss D" at Bobby's Run Elementary School, where she makes desserts and salads, and runs the cash register.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
A plan to lay off 283 civilian state police workers and assign their duties to uniformed state police has drawn fire from the head of the Trenton chapter of the workers' union. The union charged yesterday that the proposed cuts would jeopardize public safety. "Troopers should be on the road, not sitting at a desk answering telephones," said James Gray, who heads the Trenton Chapter of the International Federation of Professional and Technical Workers Local 195, which represents both operators and capital guards.
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NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Alex Wigglesworth, Staff Writer
Funeral arrangements have been set for a New Jersey state trooper killed in a one-car crash in Salem County on Thursday. The services for Trooper Eli McCarson, 30, will be held Wednesday at Rowan University's Pfleeger Concert Hall in Glassboro, state police said Saturday. A viewing is scheduled from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m., followed by a funeral at noon. McCarson will then be buried at a location that had not yet been disclosed Saturday. McCarson was on patrol when his car went off the right side of Quinton Alloway Road near Route 49 and struck a utility pole about 10:45 a.m. He was rushed to the Memorial Hospital of Salem County, where he died shortly after noon.
SPORTS
April 9, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, For The Inquirer
STATE COLLEGE, Pa. - As Adam Breneman prepares for the 2015 season, he has a renewed sense of motivation. Last season, the Nittany Lions tight end was sidelined by a knee injury, which forced him to refocus his life. "I learned how to live with myself without football for a while," Breneman said Tuesday as Penn State continued spring practice ahead of its April 18 Blue-White Game at Beaver Stadium. "I learned about myself outside of football and that was kind of neat, even though I always wanted to be playing.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The developer Bart Blatstein on Tuesday unveiled a $70 million renovation of the former State Office Building at Broad and Spring Garden Streets, the latest outpost in what he calls his "$1 billion commitment to North Broad Street. " Blatstein has made headlines by joining the competition for the city's second casino license. He wants to convert the former headquarters of The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News at 400 N. Broad into the anchor of a three-block, $700 million gaming complex.
NEWS
April 19, 2012
  Flags to be lowered to honor fallen Marine TRENTON - Gov. Christie has ordered flags at all state buildings to be flown at half-staff Friday to honor a fallen Marine corporal. The flags will be lowered in tribute to Derek Kerns, 21, of Woodstown, who was killed last week in a training mission in Morocco. Kerns joined the Marines in September 2008, shortly after he graduated from Woodstown High School. He was a MV-22 crew chief with Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 261, Marine Aircraft Group 26MV-22, and was based at New River Air Station in North Carolina.
NEWS
April 7, 2011 | By Cynthia Burton, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former U.S. Rep. John Adler liked to watch silly movies, play catch, and attend his sons' sporting events. But the thing he enjoyed the most was family dinners, his sons Andrew and Oliver said at his funeral Wednesday. About 1,400 people, including his wife, Shelley, and other two sons, Jeffrey and Alex, packed Temple Emanuel in Cherry Hill. The synagogue filled to capacity a half-hour before the service began, so the staff opened another room where mourners could watch the service on closed-circuit television.
NEWS
April 6, 2011 | By Cynthia Burton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former U.S. Rep. John Adler liked to watch silly movies, play catch, and attend his sons' sporting events. But the thing he enjoyed the most was family dinners, his sons Andrew and Oliver said at his funeral Wednesday. About 1,400 people, including his wife, Shelley, and other two sons, Jeffrey and Alex, packed Temple Emanuel in Cherry Hill. The synagogue filled to capacity a half hour before the service began, so the staff opened a chapel where mourners could watch the service on closed-circuit television.
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Maria Panaritis and Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Corbett has been largely silent on the issue that had been a hallmark of his campaign. But opponents of his desire to privatize Pennsylvania's liquor stores have activated a lobbying machine this year with help from the very workers most in jeopardy: the unionized clerks who stock shelves and operate cash registers. Only two months into its lobbying bid and a week ahead of Corbett's budget speech to address a projected $4 billion deficit, the union representing a majority of liquor store clerks says its work is gaining traction.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Of all the Republican proposals for not paying retired teachers and state troopers the pensions promised in more prosperous times, investors prefer Wisconsin-style union-busting over the state-bankruptcy gamble proposed by ex-U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich and ex-Florida Gov. Jeb Bush . State bankruptcy could let governments break their union contracts and cancel benefits, but it "is less desirable to the bondholder, because it creates a higher level of uncertainty that would increase borrowing costs for states and local municipalities," says Michael Crow , who manages $3 billion in clients' bond investments in state and local governments for Glenmede , the Philadelphia trust bank.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Joseph Tanfani and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
When a no-bid deal to build a new Family Court surfaced last month, top development officials in the Rendell administration said the arrangement was news to them - and probably not permitted by state law. "We haven't sat down with anyone and been briefed with what anyone has been talking about," said James P. Creedon, secretary of the Department of General Services. "None of that has been presented to us. " But in fact, Creedon and his top staff were getting regular briefings about the $200 million project starting in late 2008 from lawyers working for Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald D. Castille, records show.
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