CollectionsState Buildings
IN THE NEWS

State Buildings

NEWS
November 1, 1989
As believers in free trade and the benefits of a global economy, we have no objection whatsoever to Japan's Mitsubishi conglomerate buying a controlling interest in Rockefeller Center. But we do think it would be beneficial to all concerned if the new purchasers went one step further and changed the name of the New York City landmark to Mitsubishi Center. It would be jarring, of course, to a lot of people. (Could the Emperor State Building be next?) But that's just the point. How is America ever going to resist becoming a second-rate economic power if the evidence of its decline is politely concealed.
NEWS
September 1, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeouts have not pressured Walter Trommelen Jr. into quitting smoking. Nor have the U.S. surgeon general's reports prompted him to cut his two-pack-a-day habit. But Trommelen, Burlington County's public health coordinator, is hoping that maybe the law will do the trick. Passed by the New Jersey Legislature last year, "an act controlling smoking in government buildings" declared that, effective this morning, "the right of the nonsmoker to breathe clean air should supersede the right of the smoker to smoke.
NEWS
November 30, 2001
No trust. Beneath the money squabbles, low test scores and power politics, that's the core reason why the state of Pennsylvania decided to take over the Philadelphia schools. It had no trust in the people running the city school system. Never mind that this reflected at least as badly on state officials as school leaders. The cold fact was Harrisburg would not give city schools more support through dollars and deeds unless it got to call the shots. By tonight's takeover deadline, the state may have the control it sought.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | By Maureen Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tiny, financially strapped Chesilhurst Borough in lower Camden County could become home to an $80 million, six-story medium-security prison, according to the state Department of Corrections. The state Treasury Department has begun negotiations to purchase 15.5 acres on the White Horse Pike near Zimmerman Avenue and would pay Chesilhurst between $1 million and $2 million annually in lieu of taxes, according to state corrections spokesman Jim Stabile. Those revenues could double the borough's current $1.4 million budget.
NEWS
March 11, 2005 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Some contracts supervised by New Jersey's $8.6 billion school-construction program have been put on hold pending a review of cost overruns at the agency by the state's newly appointed inspector general. In a letter to acting Gov. Richard J. Codey yesterday, Inspector General Mary Jane Cooper requested that officials at the School Construction Corp. "refrain from completing and/or entering into any contracts, change orders or any other commitments for purchases or services until we have had an opportunity to review those agreements.
NEWS
July 8, 1999
Rose-colored glasses aren't a typical Philadelphia fashion accessory. But there's good reason to accentuate the positive in the latest news about the Philadelphia Phillies' effort to build a new ballpark at the northern edge of Center City. Phillies president David Montgomery has unveiled a revised plan that eliminates the need to tear down the state office building at Broad and Spring Garden Streets and relocate its 1,200 workers. That addresses a major objection some state lawmakers had with the Phils' project.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Yule logs burning, candles lit, the sweet fragrance of cut evergreens, the joyful sounds of carols - all are orchestrated to welcome visitors and conjure up the magic and beauty of winter and the holidays. During the next month, private homes and public buildings throughout Bucks and Montgomery Counties will be transformed inside and out, top to bottom. Weeks of planning and designing will culminate with thousands of visitors wandering through room upon room adorned with handcrafted decorations and holiday greens.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | By Nicholas Wishart, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The young woman suffered from back pain, so she decided to visit the only local family doctor who accepted welfare recipients. What she says happened next, however, had nothing to do with medicine. Instead, Mary Ann Oberempt says she was fondled during the office visit more than two years ago. And now, after helping the state attorney general's office build a case against Suresh Doshi, a Williamstown family practitioner, Oberempt has filed a lawsuit of her own. Her suit, filed yesterday in Gloucester County Superior Court, demands compensation for what she calls "severe emotional and psychological distress," as well as punitive damages.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The developer Bart Blatstein on Tuesday unveiled a $70 million renovation of the former State Office Building at Broad and Spring Garden Streets, the latest outpost in what he calls his "$1 billion commitment to North Broad Street. " Blatstein has made headlines by joining the competition for the city's second casino license. He wants to convert the former headquarters of The Inquirer and the Philadelphia Daily News at 400 N. Broad into the anchor of a three-block, $700 million gaming complex.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | By David Boldt
It was clear from the response to my attack on the state office building at Broad and Spring Garden that the time has come to form an official committee to destroy that edifice. It was the biggest and most unanimous positive response this writer has ever received. (There have been bigger negative responses, but that's another story.) Many Philadelphians shared my dismay that the site plan for the proposed new baseball stadium has been changed to save the state office building from the rendezvous with the wrecking ball it so richly deserves.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|