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NEWS
July 8, 1999
Rose-colored glasses aren't a typical Philadelphia fashion accessory. But there's good reason to accentuate the positive in the latest news about the Philadelphia Phillies' effort to build a new ballpark at the northern edge of Center City. Phillies president David Montgomery has unveiled a revised plan that eliminates the need to tear down the state office building at Broad and Spring Garden Streets and relocate its 1,200 workers. That addresses a major objection some state lawmakers had with the Phils' project.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Earl McCollum leans out of his Kim's Quick Snack lunch truck and tells of the day earlier this winter when metal plates on the Botany sign dislodged in a gust and crashed 10 stories below on the sidewalk at Broad Street and Lehigh Avenue. Mothers taking babies to a health clinic across the street screamed and ran, covering their heads. Commuters scattered. McCollum, 56, of West Philadelphia, ducked inside his truck when he heard the racket. "I thought the building was falling down," said McCollum, his face framed by the bricks and cemented-over windows of the enormous former suit-manufacturing factory behind him. Miraculously - for this is one of the city's busiest intersections, with thousands of commuters and nearby workers passing daily - no one was hurt.
NEWS
December 2, 1998 | By Tony Pugh, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Tull Gearreald's business plan is as simple as it is risky: Build a private medical facility, surround it with razor wire, monitor its halls with cameras, and treat ailing prisoners from throughout the Southeast. After all, tougher crime legislation is putting more criminals behind bars for longer periods. As they get older, those inmates are more likely to become chronically ill. To cope, some states are building special-care units or sending those prisoners to long-term care centers, where they are housed with civilians.
NEWS
October 28, 1998 | By Angela Pomponio, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Salvation Army officials are still searching for space to create a transitional-housing program for homeless people, with no alternative yet to a rejected location on the Norristown State Hospital grounds. Tom McCaney, the Salvation Army's emergency-housing director here, said yesterday that the organization was having no luck finding a space large enough in the area for the program. Its plan to set up transitional housing and an expanded shelter in the vacant Building 8 on the state hospital grounds was characterized as "untenable" in a Sept.
REAL_ESTATE
April 12, 1998 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
It's a midwinter morning in the high Sonoran Desert, but it might as well be spring. The sun is poking through the haze produced by the ever-growing number of automobiles choking the roads of metropolitan Phoenix. In response to the sun, the temperature has climbed rapidly past 60 degrees. Jane Edmunds pauses as a visitor from the East Coast surveys the landscape, watching roofers as they balance loads of tiles on the roof of one of the scores of unfinished houses sprouting like sagebrush in the foothills of the McDowell Mountain range.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The state Capitol is finally going cold turkey. Smoke-filled back rooms will still be allowed, but starting tomorrow, puffing in public areas in the Capitol and other state buildings across Pennsylvania will be prohibited except in a few designated areas. The restrictions "are being implemented because of fire, safety, health and long-term facility maintenance concerns," said Gary E. Crowell, secretary of the Department of General Services. Department spokeswoman Julie E. Ohlson said Friday's edict had been in the works before a February fire in a building next to the Capitol that was caused by a smoldering cigarette butt.
NEWS
November 27, 1995 | By Amy Zurzola, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Residents in two of the township's oldest neighborhoods now have one less excuse for putting off those home improvements, because the township has money available to help. The Neighborhood Preservation Program (NPP), under the direction of coordinator Lenore Rosner, has $85,000 to hand out to residents of the Kenilworth and South Woodland neighborhoods. The state-funded program offers property owners financial assistance to help pay for the cosmetic and structural repairs that can make the difference between dingy and dazzling, or even "for sale" and "sold!"
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | By Valerie Reed, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Yule logs burning, candles lit, the sweet fragrance of cut evergreens, the joyful sounds of carols - all are orchestrated to welcome visitors and conjure up the magic and beauty of winter and the holidays. During the next month, private homes and public buildings throughout Bucks and Montgomery Counties will be transformed inside and out, top to bottom. Weeks of planning and designing will culminate with thousands of visitors wandering through room upon room adorned with handcrafted decorations and holiday greens.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | By Daniel Rubin, Joseph A. Slobodzian, and Maureen Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Chris Conway and correspondents Andrew Backover and Ilene Prusher contributed to this article
It was the silence that made the loudest statement. Normally the playground outside the William J. Green Jr. Federal Building in Philadelphia is filled with the peals of toddlers, the interior brought alive with the joy of children riding in kiddie carts. All day yesterday, the playground was empty, the hallways childless - a precaution against the unthinkable, which has suddenly become all too thinkable. With hundreds of people still missing in the rubble of the bombed-out Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City - and at least 12 children known dead - local officials were taking nothing for granted.
NEWS
November 27, 1994 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
You can barely walk in the place. The shelves are stacked closely in the one-room Conshohocken Free Library, with hardly enough space for passage between the short aisles. Books are crammed together. The personal computer is on a table that partially blocks the magazine and periodical display. The copying machine is in the building's entryway. The borough's library board wants to correct those conditions. Board member John Ondik said in an interview last week that Conshohocken needed to raise $275,000 to match a state grant.
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