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NEWS
November 1, 1989
As believers in free trade and the benefits of a global economy, we have no objection whatsoever to Japan's Mitsubishi conglomerate buying a controlling interest in Rockefeller Center. But we do think it would be beneficial to all concerned if the new purchasers went one step further and changed the name of the New York City landmark to Mitsubishi Center. It would be jarring, of course, to a lot of people. (Could the Emperor State Building be next?) But that's just the point. How is America ever going to resist becoming a second-rate economic power if the evidence of its decline is politely concealed.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
The problem, say the architects and builders, is that there's been no disaster. No convention roof has caved in. No hotel skywalk has collapsed. And so, there has been no passion in a debate that has gone nowhere for years. No reason to resolve once and for all the sullen issue of a state building code. "Unfortunately, what it's going to take is a huge major accident in which people are killed," said Lela Schultz, executive director of the Pennsylvania Society of Architects.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
When visitors come to the seat of state government they are often wowed by the new East Wing Capitol addition. They marvel at its glass Rotunda dome, its brass and polished granite, its fancy color scheme. That's because they're just passing through. They don't know about the fountain that leaked into the underground garage. They aren't around when the alarm system goes bonkers, setting off flashing strobes and closing gigantic metal doors. They don't notice the drip from the leaking Rotunda roof or get blown over by the mysterious wind-tunnel effect.
NEWS
March 26, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro dropped a threat to tax the state after learning yesterday that the state erred when it said it would cut revenues the borough receives for hosting Glassboro State College. Municipalities traditionally receive money from the state in lieu of some of the real estate taxes that they are prohibited from collecting on state buildings within their town limits. Earlier this month, Glassboro received word from the state that those revenues - which last year amounted to $267,443 - would be cut by more than $47,000, to $219,121.
NEWS
April 24, 1987 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A House panel, without debate, gave unanimous approval yesterday to legislation that would restrict smoking in state-owned buildings to specially designated areas. The bill, which now moves to the full House, would prohibit smoking in public areas of the state's legislative, executive and judicial offices, including such places as the Capitol Rotunda, meeting rooms and reception areas. The ban would not affect county Courts of Common Pleas or district justice offices, according to its sponsor, Rep. Kenneth J. Cole (D., Adams)
NEWS
September 1, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
The American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeouts have not pressured Walter Trommelen Jr. into quitting smoking. Nor have the U.S. surgeon general's reports prompted him to cut his two-pack-a-day habit. But Trommelen, Burlington County's public health coordinator, is hoping that maybe the law will do the trick. Passed by the New Jersey Legislature last year, "an act controlling smoking in government buildings" declared that, effective this morning, "the right of the nonsmoker to breathe clean air should supersede the right of the smoker to smoke.
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