CollectionsState Capital
IN THE NEWS

State Capital

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is a tidy little town that calls itself a city. It is the state capital, and has two colleges and 23,000 residents. But still, at heart, it's just a tidy little town. The small-town essence of Dover flows from the friendliness of the people, the neat streets and beautiful 18th- and 19th-century homes, and from the fact that just about everything centers, New England-like, on the green in the heart of town. And there are other charming touches. The state museum is housed in a former Presbyterian church built in 1790.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON CORTES
Heading for Harrisburg - about 115 miles away - 13 striking mushroom workers stride along Lancaster Avenue in Philadelphia. The marchers, striking Kaolin Mushroom Farms in Kennett Square, started at City Hall yesterday. When they reach the state capital they plan to lobby for legislation that would make it easier for mushroom workers to join a union.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - It was a true baptism by fire. An oil tanker had toppled over just outside the city limits and exploded at the worst possible spot: the middle overpass on a double-deck interchange over one of the busiest highways in the East. No one was killed or seriously injured in the incident last May, but the road structures were badly damaged, forcing the closure of I-81 and restricting access to Route 22/322, the main highway between the state capital and State College. The incident, which would mean travel headaches for hundreds of thousands of motorists, catapulted Pennsylvania's unassuming transportation secretary, Barry Schoch, into the spotlight.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
David M. French, 86, who helped found an organization of doctors that provided medical care to marchers during the civil rights era and who later organized health-care programs in 20 African nations, died Thursday in Charlottesville, Va. The cause was a pulmonary embolism, his son Howard said. A surgeon, Dr. French was an organizer of the Medical Committee for Human Rights and in March 1965 led more than 120 of its members in the third, and finally successful, attempt by voting-rights advocates to march from Selma, Ala., to Montgomery, the state capital.
NEWS
October 8, 2010 | By Bill Reed, INQUIRER TRAVEL EDITOR
LANCASTER - We couldn't go home - not yet. We were finished moving our son and daughter into their dorm rooms at Pennsylvania State University, stocking their refrigerators, and taking them out for a goodbye lunch. But we weren't ready to return to our Langhorne house and start a new chapter of our lives, as empty nesters. So my wife, Valerie, and I took a 24-hour detour to this quaint, historic county seat for a romantic transition from parenthood to coupledom. We knew Lancaster for the clusters of outlet stores, Pennsylvania Dutch family-style restaurants, and Dutch Wonderland amusement park along commercial Route 30. But this city, though only a few miles away, is another world, with its picturesque town square and thriving farmers market; 90-plus art galleries, studios, shops, and museums; boutiques and specialty stores; stately churches and Victorian homes.
NEWS
December 14, 1991
A major bicentennial anniversary takes place tomorrow. Despite its significance, fanfare will be minimal. Two hundred years ago, the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified. It is this "Bill of Rights" which has made possible the unique liberties Americans have been enjoying (and taking for granted) while oppression and repression have festered around us. In one small way, you can observe this milestone. A document, "The Bicentennial Constitution," is at Independence National Historical Park.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Rendell came to the state capital to talk about welfare cuts in the nation's capital and to ask a state Senate committee to hold off enacting cuts of its own. "We say wait. Wait to enact state welfare reform until we see how Congress' welfare reform initiatives will impact Pennsylvania and cities like Philadelphia," Rendell said. He got little attention. With virtually no advance notice and practically no media coverage, the mayor testified before the Senate Public Health and Welfare Committee yesterday afternoon.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | Daily News Wire Services
Texas Gov. George W. Bush celebrated the greatest day of his political life yesterday, sweeping most presidential primary states, but brother Jeb Bush wasn't having much fun as governor of Florida. About 10,000 demonstrators, one of the largest such groups in state history, marched on the state capital in Tallahassee to protest the governor's "One Florida" plan as an attack on affirmative action. Inside the Capitol, Bush boosted the plan to legislators. It would end racial, ethnic and gender preferences in college admissions, state contracting and some hiring.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
IT WAS a tough way to break into reporting on the state capital. Albert J. Neri had been in Harrisburg to report on the state government for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for only a week when he was summoned to a news conference called by state Treasurer R. Budd Dwyer on Jan. 22, 1987. Dwyer had been convicted of accepting bribes from a California company to land a lucrative state contract. He was to be sentenced the next day and was sure to get prison time. As Neri and the other reporters watched in horror, Dwyer produced a pistol, put it in his mouth and killed himself as press and TV cameras recorded the deed.
SPORTS
October 10, 1989 | This feature was written by Donnat Grillet, Division of Social Studies, District Four, School District of Philadelphia. The graphics were conceived by Donnat Grillet and executed by Daily News staff artist Bruny Roldan. The page was edited by Jerry Carrier of the Daily News
HERE'S ARIZONA 'The Grand Canyon State' Key Physical Features: Grand Canyon, Sonoran Desert, Painted Desert, Gila River, Colorado River, Salt River, Hoover Dam, Lake Mead. SPOTLIGHT ON PHOENIX The Largest State Capital Phoenix is the ninth-largest city in the United States and the only state capital in the top ten. Only Honolulu, Austin, Baton Rouge, Jackson, Montgomery and Tallahassee are farther south than Arizona's capital city. Only four cities west of the Mississippi River are larger than Phoenix - Los Angeles, Houston, Dallas and San Diego!
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Quigley had not been out of office long before he began plotting his comeback. "I went on some job interviews, and the question would come, 'Are you finished with the politics?' " said Quigley, 51. "And I really wasn't. " In November, he won back his old Pennsylvania House seat by eight percentage points. The 146th District - covering Royersford, Limerick, Perkiomen, Trappe, Lower Pottsgrove, and parts of Pottstown - had been in Democratic hands only two years. State Rep. Mike Vereb, chairman of the Montgomery County Republican Committee, said Quigley's loss in 2012 to Democrat Mark Painter was little more than a fluke.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - It was a true baptism by fire. An oil tanker had toppled over just outside the city limits and exploded at the worst possible spot: the middle overpass on a double-deck interchange over one of the busiest highways in the East. No one was killed or seriously injured in the incident last May, but the road structures were badly damaged, forcing the closure of I-81 and restricting access to Route 22/322, the main highway between the state capital and State College. The incident, which would mean travel headaches for hundreds of thousands of motorists, catapulted Pennsylvania's unassuming transportation secretary, Barry Schoch, into the spotlight.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
How many dangerous bridges will it take to goad Harrisburg into acting on Pennsylvania's dire transportation-funding needs? Whatever the number is, the state doesn't seem to have reached it yet. But the Department of Transportation is working on it. Another 1,000 bridges across the commonwealth - including 134 in the Philadelphia region - were recently designated as being in such bad shape that their continued use will be contingent on new weight...
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | By Will Weissert, Associated Press
AUSTIN, Texas - Thousands of gun advocates gathered peacefully Saturday in state capitals around the nation to rally against stricter limits on firearms, with demonstrators carrying rifles and pistols in some places while those elsewhere settled for waving hand-scrawled signs or screaming themselves hoarse. The crowd sizes varied - from dozens in South Dakota to 2,000 in New York. Large crowds also turned out in Connecticut, Tennessee, and Texas. Some demonstrators in Phoenix and Salem, Ore., came with holstered handguns or rifles on their backs.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Upstart business lender TriState Capital Bank had the good fortune to open its doors with more than $100 million in new capital, and on the eve of the 2008 financial crisis and real estate collapse. So TriState still had money to pump into growing businesses over the next two years, while most U.S. banks scrambled to cut their losses and stay alive. Last week, TriState, with offices in Villanova and Lawrenceville, Pittsburgh and Cleveland, and a new Manhattan branch, raised another $50 million.
NEWS
June 15, 2012
Jamaica's leader: Got fraud funds KINGSTON, Jamaica - The leadership of Jamaica's governing party acknowledged Thursday that it received $1 million from a high-profile swindler who defrauded thousands of people across the Caribbean and the United States, but said it doesn't believe it is obligated to refund a cent. The People's National Party said it spent the $1 million it received from David Smith during the 2007 campaign for national elections, but its investigators found no records of another alleged gift of $2 million.
NEWS
April 21, 2012
Missing-boy search intensifies NEW YORK - Investigators carried rubble from a basement excavation site in Manhattan on Friday while searching for clues in the 1979 disappearance of a 6-year-old boy. Utility workers with jackhammers and saws helped chip away an area around aging pipes, then law enforcers wearing gloves carried out the basketball-size chunks of rubble and carefully placed them in refuse bins. The material will be sifted and then taken elsewhere for testing. Etan Patz vanished in 1979 after leaving his family's home for a short walk to his school bus stop.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
For all the Harrisburg politicians who proclaim they're doing the will of the people, there's a jarring disconnect with key reforms and policies that a majority of Pennsylvanians favor. The many issues that voters say they want state lawmakers to address, yet which they haven't, include: a crackdown on illegal handgun trafficking, levying a tax on natural-gas drillers, campaign-finance reform, and an end to backdoor tactics in the legislature. But now a Carlisle-based activist who earned his stripes (and scars)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|