CollectionsState Court
IN THE NEWS

State Court

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A Southwest Philadelphia man convicted of killing a Lower Merion Township police officer in 1988 was denied a new trial yesterday by the state Superior Court. The appeals court said Kendell Lee Hatfield, 25, was properly found guilty of first-degree murder, but mentally ill, by a jury on Sept. 21, 1989. He was sentenced to life in prison. Hatfield was to begin his confinement in a mental institution. When he is ruled competent, he will to be placed in a state prison to complete his term.
NEWS
August 24, 1988
When they drafted the current state budget, it was easy for Gov. Casey and the state legislators to ignore the December ruling by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court that required state government to pay for the entire Pennsylvania court system. Why? Because no one in the court system asked for the money - estimated to be an astounding $300 million to $500 million a year. Now, a good salesman always asks for your business after making his pitch, and that's apparently what the Supreme Court's administrative arm is about to do. The Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts is in the process of collecting figures on the full-time personnel costs for the courts and court- related agencies in all 67 counties.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | By Larry Lewis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The four-year quest of Joseph L. LaPorta, suspended Gloucester County roads supervisor, to reclaim his job does not fall within the jurisdiction of federal court, a U.S. district judge ruled yesterday. Judge Joseph E. Irenas heard oral arguments in the case yesterday afternoon in federal court in Camden and then ordered that LaPorta must pursue his aims in New Jersey Superior Court. LaPorta, 59, of Monroe, filed a federal civil-rights lawsuit against Gloucester County and its Board of Chosen Freeholders in January 1997, seeking his job, back pay and compensatory damages.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | By Chris Mondics and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a case that could result in her permanent removal from the bench, Chester County District Judge Rita Arnold has been cited by the state court of judicial discipline for "improper conduct" for her handling of a harassment summons given her son after a family altercation. The court said Arnold had failed to officially docket the summons at a time her son was under scrutiny for potential parole violations. Arnold not only slowed official review of the summons in a way that kept the information from parole officials, benefiting her son, according to the court, she also encouraged a court employee to mislead officials investigating the matter.
NEWS
May 22, 1987 | By Fredric N. Tulsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
A sharply divided state Supreme Court yesterday overturned a longstanding doctrine, ruling that post-arrest statements given by criminal defendants no longer must be suppressed merely because the state does not promptly arraign the defendants. The 4-3 decision, which prompted five different opinions, strikes down a 10-year-old doctrine prohibiting prosecutors from using as evidence statements by defendants not arraigned within six hours of arrest. Justice Nicholas P. Papadakos, the author of a court opinion joined by Justice Rolf Larsen, wrote that the court's experience with that "rigid rule" had "shielded the guilty for no reason relevant to the individual circumstances of their case.
NEWS
April 9, 1987 | By Michael B. Coakley, Inquirer Staff Writer
A lawsuit brought by a West Philadelphia family who was victimized by a Youth Study Center escapee has been dismissed by the state Supreme Court. Nevertheless, one justice, in a concurring opinion, stated that negligence at the Youth Study Center "may have been the cause-in-fact for the injuries" suffered by the family. Those injuries included the rapes of a woman and her 11-year-old daughter and the subsequent suicide of the man who was the woman's husband and the girl's father.
NEWS
July 10, 1998 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Yet another court ruling upholding the state's school-funding system throws more cold water on claims that Harrisburg does not pay enough for public education, and further dampens hopes the Philadelphia School District can get more state cash through litigation. Even though Philadelphia's financially troubled district is seeking more money in three major legal cases still pending - one in federal court, two before the state Supreme Court - yesterday's decision by state Commonwealth Court cannot boost district spirits.
NEWS
May 21, 2008
ALAWSUIT FILED this week tied to the 2005 legislative pay grab is a walk down memory lane - or maybe a peek under the rock of state politics. I can't let it alone. If it's true, it means that the fix is in on stuff of statewide significance. If untrue, it still feeds the fears of those who think the fix is in. Either way, it can't help the image of the state court system. And the state court system is striking back, threatening retaliation. Ah, Pennsylvania. The League of Women Voters, in a 17-page federal civil action, alleges that in its challenge to the state's 2004 gambling law, its right to due process was violated by a too-cozy, inappropriate relationship between the Legislature and the state judiciary.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | By Angela Paik, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Yet another higher court ruling has left Delaware County officials feeling that they've gotten the shaft. A Commonwealth Court decision last month limited the county sheriff's ability to collect fees from banks at sheriff's sales. The county will lose $600,000 to $750,000 - the amount generated by 1 mill of tax, Sheriff Ann A. Osborne said yesterday. Delaware County is not alone. All Pennsylvania counties are affected by the ruling, which returns sheriffs' charging policies to their status before 1992.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | By Dale Mezzacappa, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer staff writers Russell E. Eshleman Jr. and Richard Jones contributed to this article
In what could be a mortal blow to the Philadelphia School District's legal effort to get more money from Harrisburg, Commonwealth Court ruled yesterday that the court has no jurisdiction to interfere with legislative decisions on educational policy and funding. The district's chances to get the $95 million it says it needs to balance next year's budget are rapidly dwindling. The governor and state legislature have adamantly declined either to bail out the city schools or to seriously consider an overhaul of the school funding system.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
With trumpets and speeches, a drum line and song, students, teachers, politicians and others rallied Monday for education funding in advance of an important Pennsylvania Supreme Court hearing on the matter. The high court will hear arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit charging that the state has abdicated its responsibility to adequately fund school districts across the commonwealth. Parents, including two from Philadelphia, and districts including the William Penn system in Delaware County sued the state in 2014.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia School Reform Commission's nearly two-year battle to cancel the city teachers' union contract and impose new work rules to save money was soundly defeated again Monday. The state Supreme Court upheld a lower court decision last January that blocked the five-member commission from forcing terms on the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers. Union leaders called the ruling a rebuke of a power grab, and a spokesman for the commission and Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. said no further legal action would be taken.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
A week before Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is set to face criminal trial, her lawyers filed an emergency petition with the state Supreme Court on Monday asking that the charges against her be dismissed. The so-called King's Bench motion marked a last-minute attempt to avoid or delay trial for Kane. Jury selection is to begin Monday in Norristown. King's Bench actions, named for the high court in English common law, may be filed only in matters of immediate public importance.
NEWS
June 15, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Gov. Wolf has nominated Superior Court Judge Sallie Updyke Mundy to fill a vacancy on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court left when Justice J. Michael Eakin resigned this year because of his involvement in a pornographic email scandal. In nominating Mundy, 53, a Republican from Tioga County, Wolf said he would depart from the long-established tradition in Pennsylvania politics of requiring his nominee to promise not to run for the judicial seat in the next election. Instead, the Democratic governor said Monday that his nominee could seek a 10-year term on the state's highest court.
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
The Philadelphia District Attorney's Office has asked the state Supreme Court to stay a judge's order punishing prosecutors for not surrendering three cellphones for examination by lawyers in the civil case filed in connection with the Center City building collapse. The motion filed Friday contends that Common Pleas Court Judge Mark I. Bernstein had no authority to grant sanctions requested by lawyers for the Salvation Army, whose thrift store at 22nd and Market Streets was crushed when an unsupported three- to four-story brick wall toppled from an adjacent property.
NEWS
March 22, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Will the shocks, humiliations and embarrassments that have been plaguing the Pennsylvania judicial system for decades ever come to an end? Scandal has become an enduring theme of the Pennsylvania judiciary. On Tuesday, in the latest embarrassment, state Supreme Court Justice J. Michael Eakin resigned rather than face a trial before the state Court of Judicial Discipline on charges he breached ethics rules by exchanging emails containing racist and misogynistic content among a small group of lawyers and golfing companions.
NEWS
February 18, 2016 | By Martha Woodall and Kristen A. Graham, STAFF WRITERS
On the day that the Philadelphia School Reform Commission approved three new charter schools, the state Supreme Court issued a ruling Tuesday that could have grave implications for the cash-strapped district's finances and operations for years to come. The court ruled that the SRC had no legal power to suspend portions of the state charter law and school code. The ruling strips the commission of extraordinary powers it believed it had - and used. It was too soon to say exactly what the fallout for the school system would be - district lawyers offered no official comment - but early indications were ominous.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Mark Fazlollah and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
With the stakes escalating for the Pennsylvania Supreme Court in the Porngate scandal, a judicial tribunal has quietly brought in prominent Philadelphia lawyer Richard A. Sprague to mediate a deal that could forestall a public trial for Justice J. Michael Eakin. The Court of Judicial Discipline confirmed Sprague's new role on Friday. In December, the disciplinary panel suspended Eakin while he awaits trial on ethics charges for his exchange of salacious, misogynistic, and racially offensive emails.
NEWS
January 29, 2016
By Peter Vaira The Pennsylvania Supreme Court, with three new members, must now address several issues that are crucial for the administration of the criminal justice system, issues that required a fully staffed court to resolve. First, the court must deal with the compromise of the court system resulting from a scandal known as "porngate. " This involves commonwealth attorneys sending emails to court members that contain locker-room-style photos of women in degrading sexual acts or blatant ethnic or racial slurs.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|