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NEWS
December 24, 1986 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., the largest auto insurer in Pennsylvania, yesterday asked for rate increases ranging from 0.1 percent in some areas to 12.2 percent in parts of Philadelphia. State Farm's application means that Pennsylvania's four largest auto insurers, among others, all have rate requests pending before the state Insurance Department. State Farm covers more than 1 million Pennsylvania vehicles; No. 2 Nationawide Mutual Insurance Co. covers 863,000 vehicles.
NEWS
October 23, 2002 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia officials today will petition the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to deny a State Farm request for an increase of auto-insurance rates on Dec. 1. In its petition, the city called the company's proposed increases for Philadelphia "excessive and unfairly discriminatory. " The rate hikes - which the city said would run from 5.1 percent to 8 percent - would increase the average $2,400 policy by at least $120. The city's auto-insurance rates are already the highest in the state.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
DAVID NAYLOR HAS the weirdest problem I've ever heard. He wants to save an insurance company some money, but they won't let him. Told ya it was weird. Naylor was driving his 2002 GMC Savana up 2nd Street when a car darted out of a parking spot and hit Naylor's seven-passenger van on the right side. "It was no big deal," says Naylor, who lives in a pretty rowhouse in the Morrell Park section of Northeast Philly with his wife and two sons (a married daughter lives around the corner)
BUSINESS
March 31, 1988 | By KEVIN HANEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Two of the state's largest automobile insurers are seeking rate increases, claiming huge underwriting losses. State Farm, the largest auto insurer in Pennsylvania, has asked for premium increases of 7.3 percent statewide, with a 10.3 percent jump in Philadelphia. Allstate, the third largest, wants a 6.4 percent boost statewide. But some city policyholders would see an increase of up to 18.4 percent. State Farm has 1.2 million insured vehicles in Pennsylvania, including 66,000 cars and small trucks in Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
In 1983, Dr. Stephen Batoff, a Northeast Philadelphia psychologist, was owed $2,100 for treating an auto accident victim insured by the State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. State Farm refused to pay. It claimed that Batoff, 38, was padding bills. After a hassle, he got his money, but was told by the company that he was going to be "put out of business" because he was submitting too many large bills to State Farm, said his lawyer, David S. Dessen. "The whole incident is now going to cost State Farm $632,000," Dessen said yesterday.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer TV Writer
When Regis Philbin stepped away from Live With Regis and Kelly last year, it was widely assumed that his record of 17,000 hours of airtime amassed over a career was unassailable. Instead it's being pecked away at in innumerable 30-second increments by a perky lady in white overalls and a little walking, talking lizard. You're not imagining it - commercials for car insurance, many of them featuring the aforementioned Flo or the Gecko, have overrun TV. Why the tsunami?
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
About 30,000 Philadelphia-area motorists will have the chance to buy catastrophic-loss auto insurance starting March 1 - at more than five times what they're paying now to the state's Catastrophic Loss Trust Fund and double what they would have paid if the Legislature hadn't killed the CAT. The motorists are those insured by the Erie Insurance Company. They will have the option to purchase the coverage at $45 per year, per car. State Insurance Commissioner Constance Foster yesterday approved Erie's rate statewide as "reasonable.
NEWS
July 11, 1990 | By John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Part of the state's new insurance law has been ruled unconstitutional. Strangely, the impact of the ruling is virtually nil. Even though Commonwealth Court says the law's retroactive freezing of insurance rates at December 1989 levels was wrong, most consumers and insurance companies won't be fazed by the decision. That's because major insurers who challenged the freeze made a deal with the state to bill at rates that basically made the freeze moot. All the ruling does is affirm those deals.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The body-shop owner allegedly drove cars into poles and damaged them with forklifts - right across the street from the Darby Borough police station - in a scam to collect inflated claims from insurance companies. On Monday, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan announced charges in a four-year investigation into the elaborate scheme that cost companies at least $85,000 and involved 11 individuals. Whelan said he expected to uncover further instances in the fraud scheme, adding, "We'd be naive to think this is the only amount of activity.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Gambardello, a construction worker from Pennsauken, has been hunting for 17 of his 25 years. He recalls clearly and with pride taking down his first deer, a four-point buck, in the Pine Barrens at age 15. His father was there to see it. "It's the biggest high you can ever get in your life," he said. But in the last several years, Gambardello has become increasingly aware of other hunters in the woods: Coyotes. "Eight years ago, it was very, very rare," he said. "Now walk down the road, and you see more coyote tracks than deer tracks.
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NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The body-shop owner allegedly drove cars into poles and damaged them with forklifts - right across the street from the Darby Borough police station - in a scam to collect inflated claims from insurance companies. On Monday, Delaware County District Attorney Jack Whelan announced charges in a four-year investigation into the elaborate scheme that cost companies at least $85,000 and involved 11 individuals. Whelan said he expected to uncover further instances in the fraud scheme, adding, "We'd be naive to think this is the only amount of activity.
NEWS
January 20, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike Gambardello, a construction worker from Pennsauken, has been hunting for 17 of his 25 years. He recalls clearly and with pride taking down his first deer, a four-point buck, in the Pine Barrens at age 15. His father was there to see it. "It's the biggest high you can ever get in your life," he said. But in the last several years, Gambardello has become increasingly aware of other hunters in the woods: Coyotes. "Eight years ago, it was very, very rare," he said. "Now walk down the road, and you see more coyote tracks than deer tracks.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
You may or may not think it's fair that your credit history could play a key role in setting your auto-insurance premiums - a long-running debate in insurance regulation, though a battle that insurers so far appear to have won. Only a handful of states - California, Massachusetts, and Hawaii - have limited credit scores' use in insurance pricing. If you pay bills promptly and have a top credit score, you likely benefit. But you suffer if you occasionally fall short, which is why groups such as the Consumer Federation of America contend that the practice discriminates against low- and middle-income drivers.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
DAVID NAYLOR HAS the weirdest problem I've ever heard. He wants to save an insurance company some money, but they won't let him. Told ya it was weird. Naylor was driving his 2002 GMC Savana up 2nd Street when a car darted out of a parking spot and hit Naylor's seven-passenger van on the right side. "It was no big deal," says Naylor, who lives in a pretty rowhouse in the Morrell Park section of Northeast Philly with his wife and two sons (a married daughter lives around the corner)
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN ED WHITE'S family would drive past Northeast Catholic High School for Boys on Torresdale Avenue, they could easily envision a halo around the building. The image came to mind because of the near-holy reverence Ed had for his alma mater. What was it about that school that Ed White held in such deference? A quiet man of few words, Ed might have had trouble putting his feelings into words, but his family attributed it to the gratitude he had for the education he received there, and his deep respect for the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales who run it. Whatever it was, Ed continued to serve the school long after he graduated in 1955.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer TV Writer
When Regis Philbin stepped away from Live With Regis and Kelly last year, it was widely assumed that his record of 17,000 hours of airtime amassed over a career was unassailable. Instead it's being pecked away at in innumerable 30-second increments by a perky lady in white overalls and a little walking, talking lizard. You're not imagining it - commercials for car insurance, many of them featuring the aforementioned Flo or the Gecko, have overrun TV. Why the tsunami?
FOOD
July 7, 2011 | By Tara Nurin, For The Inquirer
Imagine a farmer's market within walking distance where the prices are low, the crates are stocked with cultural favorites, food stamps are accepted, and local agencies are on hand for vision screening, blood-pressure testing, even needle exchanges. That's what got under way June 30 in Camden, thanks to a $100,000 investment from the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and a partnership with Philadelphia's famed Greensgrow Farms. This new mobile market, run from a used van that Greensgrow bought with a donation from Subaru, has side windows for ventilation, awnings for shade, and racks outside for self-service shopping.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Corporate America has gotten President Obama's attention. His State of the Union message Tuesday night called for lower business taxes, free-trade deals with foreign countries, and subsidies for science education, road and rail, and wireless phone projects. Business leaders are "heartened by President Obama's focus on American competitiveness" and his willingness "to change direction and focus on what is necessary to drive a vigorous recovery," replied John Engler , head of the Business Roundtable , which counts the bosses of ExxonMobil, Dow Chemical, Boeing, General Electric, Wal-Mart, Verizon, State Farm , and JPMorgan , among others, on its executive committee.
NEWS
May 1, 2008 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State Farm officials began sending notices to customers last month, saying they would not be renewing some homeowners' policies at the Jersey Shore. The company wants to reduce the number of its policyholders along the coast by 2 percent over the next five years, said State Farm spokesman John Baldino. With those letters, State Farm became the latest company to target coastal areas after Hurricane Katrina - and a variety of lesser weather events - cost the insurance industry billions of dollars in claims.
NEWS
January 21, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Douglas Howe competed at the Pennsylvania Farm Show for seven years as a youth, he won no better than third- and fourth-place prizes. His wife, Jenny, never competed because she was not raised in a farm family. But five of their six children are old enough to compete at the annual state show in Harrisburg. And so they competed this year. Did they ever. Showing their Hereford heifers - young cows - Howe children Austin, 16, Andre, 14, Aleesha, 12, Nigel, 10, and Ethan, 8, walked away with 17 first-place prizes.
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