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NEWS
February 11, 1994 | By C.R. Harper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A township ordinance on employee work rules that has been on the books for almost 20 years will have to be changed because it conflicts with state law, the Township Council was told Wednesday night. The township's administrative code, which was created after the council adopted its Home Rule Charter in 1974, says work rules for all township employees have to be set by the council by ordinance, Councilman Edwin J. Truitt said at the meeting. But state law "requires they be set by collective bargaining," Truitt said.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Donald Osgood 2d mostly spends his days in the Sixth Street home of his aunt and uncle, Stephanie and Claude Osgood. Nintendo games idle away some of the teenager's time, and small household chores or an occasional trip to the market or library fill the rest. Bored and missing valuable class time, Donald says he would rather be attending school. But for six weeks he has been caught in the middle of a residency dispute between the Osgoods and William Penn School District officials, who refuse to admit him to school.
NEWS
September 1, 1998
An Aug. 16 letter incorrectly described a provision of the Fine Arts Preservation Act of 1986. Under this state law, in cases where art can be removed intact from a building, Pennsylvania requires a building owner to notify the creator of the work (or his heirs), then wait 90 days to afford the artist the opportunity to remove the art or pay for its removal.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | By Sonya Baker, Special to The Inquirer
Councilman John Engelberger wanted to get their attention. He did. During Morrisville Borough's council meeting Tuesday, Engelberger took a handgun wrapped in cloth out of a large envelope and placed it on the table before him. "I just would like to ask if anyone brought a firearm tonight?" he said, stunning council members and about 15 others present. Anyone who carried a gun into the borough building would be within his rights by state law, but in violation of a Morrisville ordinance, he said.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
The sentencing judge warned it would be "only a matter of time before he would kill again. " A state corrections official said he shouldn't be given a prison furlough because of his "extensive history of uncalculated, often brutal assaults. " And, contrary to state law, the family of the young woman he murdered wasn't even notified. But somehow, Robert "Mudman" Simon, a member of the Warlock motorcycle gang with a lengthy arrest record, was granted a parole last November by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania after serving only 12 1/2 years of a 20-year sentence for murder and released from Graterford prison in February.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
H E CARRIES a gun, he displays a badge, he wears a uniform, but Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey is not a certified police officer, technically speaking, and shouldn't be armed, badged and uniformed. Since 2004, state law has required that anyone seeking to become a law-enforcement agent in the commonwealth must first pass a comprehensive test and be certified by the Municipal Police Officers' Training and Education Commission. The law applies to all police - campus, SEPTA, airport, sheriff - with "general police powers and charged with making arrests in connection with the enforcement of the criminal or traffic laws.
NEWS
February 20, 1988 | By Rose Simmons, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Assemblyman Robert C. Shinn Jr. plans to hold a hearing Monday on legislation that could undermine Delran Township's legal challenge to Burlington County's $1 million trash-recycling center, both Shinn and township officials acknowledged yesterday. Shinn, a Hainesport Republican who also is the county's special projects coordinator, is co-sponsor of a bill that would exempt counties from certain requirements of New Jersey's mandatory-recycling law. Under current state law, to get approval for a recycling plan, counties must demonstrate that they have buyers for their recycled materials and that the process would be cheaper than putting the material in landfills.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | By Michael Weick, Special to The Inquirer
The Delanco Township Committee has set a public hearing for Dec. 21 on an amendment to an ordinance that regulates the salaries of township employees. At the end of each year, the township is required by state law to revise its salary guidelines for the upcoming year. According to township clerk- administrator Jeffrey Hatcher, new rates must be set by Jan. 1. The chief of police now earns between $28,000 and $34,000 annually, while patrolmen earn between $22,000 and $26,000.
NEWS
June 9, 2008
New Jersey passed a smart law last year requiring companies to give workers notice before they get laid off. Unfortunately, in its first big test, the law failed to provide the intended protection. Last month, Burlington County's Jevic Transportation Inc. abruptly closed its doors. More than 1,000 Jevic employees were stunned when they reported to work May 19 to learn that it would be their last day of employment. The workers were sent packing with no severance pay, health benefits or heads-up to find other jobs.
NEWS
June 9, 2008
New Jersey passed a smart law last year requiring companies to give workers notice before they get laid off. Unfortunately, in its first big test, the law failed to provide the intended protection. Last month, Burlington County's Jevic Transportation Inc. abruptly closed its doors. More than 1,000 Jevic employees were stunned when they reported to work May 19 to learn that it would be their last day of employment. The workers were sent packing with no severance pay, health benefits or heads-up to find other jobs.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | By Caitlin McCabe, Inquirer Staff Writer
Delaware County officials and a state representative disagree about a key piece of state legislation that may play a crucial role in a lawsuit filed by the county. On Tuesday, county officials publicly announced a $41.4 million lawsuit against 19 telecommunication carriers, alleging that the providers violated state law by undercharging customers - particularly medium-size to large businesses - for the number of phone lines they operate. The under-billings are significant, the county alleges, because 911 fees - charged to customers as $1 per month on every line they operate - are not collected and remitted to fund the county's emergency services.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Five Democratic legislators and the cities of Philadelphia and Lancaster have filed suit to block a new state law that greatly expands the ability of gun advocates - including the National Rifle Association - to challenge local attempts to regulate firearms. The law, passed in late October, gives the NRA legal standing to bring suits against local municipalities that enact their own gun laws and to require those municipalities to bear all legal costs should they lose. As the result of the law, gun control advocates say, municipalities that attempt to place restrictions on guns could face prohibitively costly court fees should those laws be found legally wanting.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another delay may be in store for a controversial new law allowing the National Rifle Association to sue over municipal gun ordinances. When Gov. Corbett signed the law Oct. 28, municipalities had 60 days to decide whether to repeal their ordinances or risk a costly lawsuit. But the clock was pushed back 10 days when it was discovered that Corbett had signed the wrong version of the law. Now, several leading Democrats are trying to delay the law further - or block it entirely - by challenging its constitutionality.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
A POLITICAL-action committee set up to help Gov. Corbett win re-election received nearly $1 million from a billionaire casino investor barred from making political contributions in Pennsylvania. The Republican Governors Association, chaired by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, reported receiving $1 million for its federal political-action committee on Dec. 31 from Sheldon Adelson, CEO of the Las Vegas Sands Corp. The group immediately moved $987,844 of Adelson's money into its "RGA Pennsylvania 2014 PAC," according to a state campaign-finance report filed Jan. 31. Pennsylvania's gaming law prohibits casino owners in the state from making contributions to candidates for state office or political-action committees in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
March 22, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
An attorney for Jerry Sandusky contends that members of the state retirement system used an unprecedented and improper interpretation of the law to strip Sandusky of his pension after his conviction on child sex-abuse charges. The State Employees Retirement System revoked Sandusky's $4,900 monthly Pennsylvania State University payments after concluding that his 2012 conviction violated laws governing such pensions. Sandusky stopped working as a Penn State assistant football coach in 1999, but the agency concluded he was "an actual or de facto employee" of the school through 2008, a span during which he sexually abused boys.
NEWS
July 26, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
AT LEAST FIVE same-sex couples obtained marriage licenses yesterday in Montgomery County, which is defying a state ban on such unions. Alicia Terrizzi and Loreen Bloodgood, of Pottstown, were the only couple to marry right away, exchanging vows in a park before a minister and their two young sons. "We're not setting out to be pioneers. We don't think our family is any different than anybody else," said Terrizzi, 45, a teacher. "We've been waiting a long time for this. " The licenses issued yesterday are believed to be the first to same-sex couples in Pennsylvania, the only northeastern state without same-sex marriages or civil unions.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dean of Pennsylvania State University's Dickinson School of Law has announced he will step down effective July 31 to take a position at Peking University, Penn State said Thursday. Philip J. McConnaughay, who also was founding dean of Penn State's School of International Affairs, will become dean of Peking's School of Transnational law in Shenzhen, China, beginning Aug. 1. McConnaughay has led the law school, now with locations at both University Park and Carlisle, since 2002.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
Judging from the refusal of top Pennsylvania Republicans to entertain tougher gun-violence measures, news must travel slowly to Harrisburg. State legislators in the capital seem a million miles from grief-stricken Newtown, Conn., scene of the mass murder of schoolchildren on Friday. "Gun control is not going to stop madmen," says Gov. Corbett through a spokesman. State Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler), who heads the House state government committee, vows that he won't "allow the left to use this horrific act to advance their gun-grabbing agenda.
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