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NEWS
November 5, 1997 | By Angela Couloumbis, Herbert Lowe and Karen D.Brown, FOR THE INQUIRER
In a stunning upset, voters in the Sixth District dealt a resounding blow to this year's Republican ticket, ushering in two popular Democratic incumbents and a Democratic political newcomer to be their voice in the state legislature. Sen. John Adler, Assemblyman Louis Greenwald and Mary Previte edged out the Republicans by a comfortable margin, despite predictions of a nail-biter race. By 10 p.m., nine-term Republican Assemblyman John Rocco, who ran against Adler, and Republican Assembly candidates Thomas Shusted Jr. and Susan Rose conceded defeat.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Still reeling from the trauma of constructing this year's school budgets under the state's new education funding law, education officials are already looking ahead and urging the state legislature to act now to prevent the chaos from recurring next year. Three statewide education groups, complaining that the Whitman administration's new school funding rules go beyond the intent of the legislature and are confusing, yesterday urged the Joint Committee on Public Schools to immediately review the regulations.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | By ACEL MOORE
Never in my three decades as a journalist have I witnessed more dramatic and earth-shaking political change than has occurred in this city and state over the last five months. These events and the changes they portend will change the political landscape of this city and possibly the state for the foreseeable future. It began with the untimely death of U.S. Sen. John Heinz, who was killed when his small chartered plane collided with a helicopter over a Lower Merion elementary school on April 4. The ramifications of Heinz's death hit the city and the state with earthquake-like force.
NEWS
May 10, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Make elections fair In the Pennsylvania primaries, with hot battles for president in both major parties and 18 congressional seats and a Senate seat at stake, just 45 percent of registered voters turned out. This was a primary people cared about, with clear, major differences that separated the candidates. Why did most voters stay home? Many believe the system is rigged, through complicated political party rules for nominating conventions, through superdelegates, and in other ways ("After the primaries," May 1)
NEWS
March 23, 2016
ISSUE | CHILD ABUSE More help for victims I applaud the decision to charge Franciscan supervisors with covering up crimes against children ("3 Franciscans accused in abuse," Wednesday). The state legislature should stop placating the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference and move on statute of limitations reform so that more abuse victims can have their day in court. |George Salloom, Drexel Hill
NEWS
May 16, 2006
PERHAPS NOW, after the murder of police officer Gary Skerski, the state legislature will make a move to allow Philadelphia to draft its own gun laws. Where are their priorities? Doesn't human life mean anything to them? They were quick to pull the trigger on their pay raises. Last year, 380 Philadelphians were murdered. At the current pace, we will surpass that appalling amount by year's end. Come on, Gov. Rendell, a Philadelphian, get their butts moving. The elections are coming in November.
NEWS
February 9, 1986
Philadelphia's highly contemptible justice system will never change substantially unless, one, someone in a position to do so decides to step on some toes and strictly enforce the existing ethical and disciplinary rules that all judges and lawyers are subject to or, two, the state legislature wakes up and changes the current public election method of selecting city judges. The first solution is not likely to occur as no one with the capacity to do so has seen fit to routinely enforce the rules, despite the fact that the city's justice system has deteriorated to a state that strains the bounds of toleration.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | By Christian Davenport and Ralph Vigoda, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer staff writer Tom Infield and correspondent John Murawski contributed to this article
Haverford State Hospital, a green, expansive campus considered a jewel in the mental health field when it opened in 1962, will shut down next year, sending 120 patients to Norristown State Hospital and about that many more into community settings in the five-county Philadelphia region. The closing, announced yesterday by the state Department of Public Welfare, will likely put some of the 442 Haverford employees out of work, although many will be absorbed by Norristown State, where 268 jobs will be created.
NEWS
April 28, 2016
The U.S. Supreme Court has noted correctly that "the voters should choose their representatives, not the other way around. " In Pennsylvania, which nominated candidates for Congress and state legislature in Tuesday's primaries, that is not how representative government has worked for many years. At the beginning of this decade, Republicans drew legislative and congressional district lines so masterfully - and questionably - that the state's delegations don't come close to reflecting the population they're supposed to represent.
NEWS
April 6, 2011
Ned McWherter, 80, a former two-term Democratic governor of Tennessee who once served as a political adviser to President Bill Clinton, died Monday at a hospital in Nashville. He had cancer, assistant Madelyn Pritchett said. Mr. McWherter, a child of sharecroppers who rose to become a millionaire businessman, was governor from 1987 to 1995 after 20 years in the state legislature. As governor, he sought to put more computers in classrooms and boost teacher pay while promising honest government.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Make elections fair In the Pennsylvania primaries, with hot battles for president in both major parties and 18 congressional seats and a Senate seat at stake, just 45 percent of registered voters turned out. This was a primary people cared about, with clear, major differences that separated the candidates. Why did most voters stay home? Many believe the system is rigged, through complicated political party rules for nominating conventions, through superdelegates, and in other ways ("After the primaries," May 1)
NEWS
April 28, 2016
The U.S. Supreme Court has noted correctly that "the voters should choose their representatives, not the other way around. " In Pennsylvania, which nominated candidates for Congress and state legislature in Tuesday's primaries, that is not how representative government has worked for many years. At the beginning of this decade, Republicans drew legislative and congressional district lines so masterfully - and questionably - that the state's delegations don't come close to reflecting the population they're supposed to represent.
NEWS
April 6, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN ENERGY Wolf's veto works Gov. Wolf was right to veto House Bill 1327 and preserve Pennsylvania's progress toward compliance with the federal Clean Power Plan in the face of roadblocks put up by the state legislature for short-term political gain ("Wolf vetoes Pennsylvania's fiscal code," March 29). The bill would have empowered the House and Senate to block the state's compliance plan. Interfering with the development and submission of a plan could force the state to accept a federal plan.
NEWS
April 5, 2016
ISSUE | PA. BUDGET Brain drain? The editorial "With a whimper" (March 24) highlights Pennsylvania's failure to pass a budget that adequately invests in human services. The state legislature has repeatedly failed to pass a budget that raises new revenue. As a result, human services have been sorely underfunded and could face drastic cuts if revenue is not increased this year. Failing to invest in human services has serious implications for the nonprofit job market.
NEWS
March 23, 2016
ISSUE | CHILD ABUSE More help for victims I applaud the decision to charge Franciscan supervisors with covering up crimes against children ("3 Franciscans accused in abuse," Wednesday). The state legislature should stop placating the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference and move on statute of limitations reform so that more abuse victims can have their day in court. |George Salloom, Drexel Hill
NEWS
February 26, 2016
IN FOCUSING on the problems created and solvable by our state legislature, the Daily News editorial board got it right in their editorial "Supreme mess: Ruling will erode Philly school district. " For the last several years, schools across Pennsylvania have fallen deeper and deeper into crisis. Drastic funding cuts to school districts across the state have resulted in layoffs of thousands of teachers, counselors, nurses and crucial support staff. AP classes, art, music and extracurricular opportunities have been limited.
NEWS
February 5, 2016
GOV. WOLF was in Philadelphia on Thursday to tout his plan to provide an additional $200 million in subsidies to basic education, plus another $60 million in state money for pre-K for all children - a goal he shares with Mayor Kenney. Of course, we all know the problem with using these numbers. There is no guarantee the state Legislature will approve any of this new spending. In fact, the odds are against it. Forget about next year. The Legislature failed to approve the governor's call for an extra $360 million in additional funds for basic education this year.
NEWS
January 21, 2016
THINGS HAVE gotten so bad in the state Legislature in Harrisburg that a number of inmates are fleeing the asylum. So far, 16 incumbents - 11 Republicans and five Democrats - have announced they will not seek re-election. Some are doing it for career reasons. State Rep. Dwight Evans, for instance, is quitting to run against U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. But a number said they are departing the scene because they essentially have lost faith in the chambers where they have served. As state Rep. Peter Daley put it: "I'm benching myself for a while.
NEWS
October 9, 2015
BECAUSE OF THE failure of Harrisburg to act on a new state budget, people across the state are beginning to feel the hurt. And it's only going to get worse. Seventy two cents of every tax dollar sent to Harrisburg gets returned to local governments and school districts. And they cannot operate without regular infusions of state aid. That aid stopped July 1, when the deadline for a new state budget came and went. Over the summer, as the budget stalemate continued, districts and local agencies found ways to cope.
NEWS
March 18, 2015
"WOMEN HAVE a right to their own careers. " The Daily News overlooked this concept, judging from the recent coverage of Shari Williams, a longtime communications professional who works for the Marcellus Shale Coalition to advance the expansion of the natural-gas industry in Pennsylvania. Under the insulting headline "Hubby Lobby," the story implies that Mrs. Williams got her job in 2012 only after her husband, state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams, voted for legislation that supports the expansion of the gas industry.
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