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NEWS
November 5, 1997 | By Angela Couloumbis, Herbert Lowe and Karen D.Brown, FOR THE INQUIRER
In a stunning upset, voters in the Sixth District dealt a resounding blow to this year's Republican ticket, ushering in two popular Democratic incumbents and a Democratic political newcomer to be their voice in the state legislature. Sen. John Adler, Assemblyman Louis Greenwald and Mary Previte edged out the Republicans by a comfortable margin, despite predictions of a nail-biter race. By 10 p.m., nine-term Republican Assemblyman John Rocco, who ran against Adler, and Republican Assembly candidates Thomas Shusted Jr. and Susan Rose conceded defeat.
NEWS
March 21, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Still reeling from the trauma of constructing this year's school budgets under the state's new education funding law, education officials are already looking ahead and urging the state legislature to act now to prevent the chaos from recurring next year. Three statewide education groups, complaining that the Whitman administration's new school funding rules go beyond the intent of the legislature and are confusing, yesterday urged the Joint Committee on Public Schools to immediately review the regulations.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | By ACEL MOORE
Never in my three decades as a journalist have I witnessed more dramatic and earth-shaking political change than has occurred in this city and state over the last five months. These events and the changes they portend will change the political landscape of this city and possibly the state for the foreseeable future. It began with the untimely death of U.S. Sen. John Heinz, who was killed when his small chartered plane collided with a helicopter over a Lower Merion elementary school on April 4. The ramifications of Heinz's death hit the city and the state with earthquake-like force.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - When this resort 63 years ago completed the Jersey Shore's first engineered beach-replenishment project, pumping 2.54 million cubic yards of sand onto a two-mile stretch of beachfront at a cost of around $4 million, officials thought it would solve the town's erosion problems for good. But by 1958, it appeared Ocean City - and ultimately its neighbors up and down the coast - would need more beach replenishment. And would have to keep doing it in the ensuing decades.
NEWS
October 9, 2015
BECAUSE OF THE failure of Harrisburg to act on a new state budget, people across the state are beginning to feel the hurt. And it's only going to get worse. Seventy two cents of every tax dollar sent to Harrisburg gets returned to local governments and school districts. And they cannot operate without regular infusions of state aid. That aid stopped July 1, when the deadline for a new state budget came and went. Over the summer, as the budget stalemate continued, districts and local agencies found ways to cope.
NEWS
May 16, 2006
PERHAPS NOW, after the murder of police officer Gary Skerski, the state legislature will make a move to allow Philadelphia to draft its own gun laws. Where are their priorities? Doesn't human life mean anything to them? They were quick to pull the trigger on their pay raises. Last year, 380 Philadelphians were murdered. At the current pace, we will surpass that appalling amount by year's end. Come on, Gov. Rendell, a Philadelphian, get their butts moving. The elections are coming in November.
NEWS
February 9, 1986
Philadelphia's highly contemptible justice system will never change substantially unless, one, someone in a position to do so decides to step on some toes and strictly enforce the existing ethical and disciplinary rules that all judges and lawyers are subject to or, two, the state legislature wakes up and changes the current public election method of selecting city judges. The first solution is not likely to occur as no one with the capacity to do so has seen fit to routinely enforce the rules, despite the fact that the city's justice system has deteriorated to a state that strains the bounds of toleration.
NEWS
August 27, 1997 | By Christian Davenport and Ralph Vigoda, FOR THE INQUIRER Inquirer staff writer Tom Infield and correspondent John Murawski contributed to this article
Haverford State Hospital, a green, expansive campus considered a jewel in the mental health field when it opened in 1962, will shut down next year, sending 120 patients to Norristown State Hospital and about that many more into community settings in the five-county Philadelphia region. The closing, announced yesterday by the state Department of Public Welfare, will likely put some of the 442 Haverford employees out of work, although many will be absorbed by Norristown State, where 268 jobs will be created.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday approved a two-year certification for Lyft to operate throughout the state, except in Philadelphia, where the PUC does not regulate taxis or ride-share operators. In Philadelphia, Lyft operates in defiance of a ban by the Philadelphia Parking Authority, which has ruled ride-share operators that connect riders and private drivers through a smart-phone app are illegal taxi services. Lyft's larger competition, Uber, received similar approval last month.
NEWS
January 21, 2016
THINGS HAVE gotten so bad in the state Legislature in Harrisburg that a number of inmates are fleeing the asylum. So far, 16 incumbents - 11 Republicans and five Democrats - have announced they will not seek re-election. Some are doing it for career reasons. State Rep. Dwight Evans, for instance, is quitting to run against U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. But a number said they are departing the scene because they essentially have lost faith in the chambers where they have served. As state Rep. Peter Daley put it: "I'm benching myself for a while.
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NEWS
January 21, 2016
THINGS HAVE gotten so bad in the state Legislature in Harrisburg that a number of inmates are fleeing the asylum. So far, 16 incumbents - 11 Republicans and five Democrats - have announced they will not seek re-election. Some are doing it for career reasons. State Rep. Dwight Evans, for instance, is quitting to run against U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah. But a number said they are departing the scene because they essentially have lost faith in the chambers where they have served. As state Rep. Peter Daley put it: "I'm benching myself for a while.
NEWS
October 9, 2015
BECAUSE OF THE failure of Harrisburg to act on a new state budget, people across the state are beginning to feel the hurt. And it's only going to get worse. Seventy two cents of every tax dollar sent to Harrisburg gets returned to local governments and school districts. And they cannot operate without regular infusions of state aid. That aid stopped July 1, when the deadline for a new state budget came and went. Over the summer, as the budget stalemate continued, districts and local agencies found ways to cope.
NEWS
March 18, 2015
"WOMEN HAVE a right to their own careers. " The Daily News overlooked this concept, judging from the recent coverage of Shari Williams, a longtime communications professional who works for the Marcellus Shale Coalition to advance the expansion of the natural-gas industry in Pennsylvania. Under the insulting headline "Hubby Lobby," the story implies that Mrs. Williams got her job in 2012 only after her husband, state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams, voted for legislation that supports the expansion of the gas industry.
NEWS
March 10, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - When this resort 63 years ago completed the Jersey Shore's first engineered beach-replenishment project, pumping 2.54 million cubic yards of sand onto a two-mile stretch of beachfront at a cost of around $4 million, officials thought it would solve the town's erosion problems for good. But by 1958, it appeared Ocean City - and ultimately its neighbors up and down the coast - would need more beach replenishment. And would have to keep doing it in the ensuing decades.
NEWS
February 14, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday approved a two-year certification for Lyft to operate throughout the state, except in Philadelphia, where the PUC does not regulate taxis or ride-share operators. In Philadelphia, Lyft operates in defiance of a ban by the Philadelphia Parking Authority, which has ruled ride-share operators that connect riders and private drivers through a smart-phone app are illegal taxi services. Lyft's larger competition, Uber, received similar approval last month.
NEWS
December 20, 2014 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Bills requiring New Jersey public contracts at the state and local levels to use U.S.-made goods passed the state Legislature on Thursday over the objections of business groups, which argued that the measures would make the state less competitive. The five bills - one related to state and local entities, including state colleges, and the others to bistate transportation agencies, including the Delaware River Port Authority - passed largely along party lines in the Democratic-controlled Assembly.
NEWS
November 22, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - There are no doubt partisan battles ahead, but for now, Gov.-elect Tom Wolf is trying to set a positive tone with Republicans who control the state legislature. Wolf, a Democrat, surprised some legislative leaders on the other side of the aisle with a phone call shortly after his election. Then he sent a handwritten introductory note that was read aloud to Republican and Democrats in both chambers during caucus meetings. Then he called some top lawmakers a second time.
NEWS
November 20, 2014
EIGHT YEARS ago, the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board awarded two licenses for Philadelphia casinos. The first, SugarHouse, opened on Delaware Avenue four years later. We all know what happened to the second: Foxwoods was delayed and delayed until it no longer became economically viable, and almost four years to the day of granting Foxwoods a license, the gaming board revoked it. Then began the long, slow process of awarding that second license to someone else. Yesterday, the board ended the suspense when it announced that the second will go to Live!
NEWS
October 24, 2014
ISSUE | GUN CONTROL Legal horror Just in time for Halloween comes a real monstrosity from the state legislature - a bill that effectively prevents municipalities from enacting ordinances stricter than state firearms laws ("Gun-ban lawsuit bill OKd," Oct. 21). Gov. Corbett (surprise, surprise) has already said he will sign. As attorney general, Corbett also refused police chiefs' pleas to close the Florida loophole, which allows anyone denied a handgun permit to obtain an out-of-state permit.
NEWS
September 11, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like a run of convicted Pennsylvania politicians before him, former State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo is beginning to build a postprison career advising clients how to work the levers of government. The president of the Pennsylvania Thoroughbred Horsemen's Association said this week that his group had hired Fumo to provide it with "strategic input. " "He has unique experience both in the legislature and with the act" regulating gambling in Pennsylvania, said Salvatore M. DeBunda. "We felt that he paid his dues and he's allowed to go on with his life.
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