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State Prison

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NEWS
October 26, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
The massive raid at Graterford state prison earlier this week grabbed the attention of the outside world, but the biggest show of force was the quiet, hurried transfer of a dozen inmates who wielded the real power inside the prison walls. More than the unprecedented raid by 650 state troopers and prison guards, more than the forced retirement of two top prison officials, more than the strip-searches of the 3,490 inmates and the cell-by-cell shakedown for drugs and weapons, the biggest symbol of change was the dethroning of the reputed leader of prison wheeling-and-dealing.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | By Stephanie Doster INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A former Philadelphia paratransit driver convicted of raping a woman with cerebral palsy was sentenced in Bucks County Court Friday to serve 20 to 40 years in state prison. David Desouza, 49, sat motionless as Judge Alan M. Rubenstein sentenced him to two consecutive 10- to 20-year terms for rape and involuntary deviate sexual intercourse. Rubenstein cited the crime's "heinousness, its sheer, unbridled depravity, and the absolute horror visited upon the victim. " Rubenstein told Desouza: "You probably believed she would never tell anyone about this, and if she did, no one would believe her. . . . But she was not the perfect victim.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Taylor considers himself a man who stands up for his rights and those of his fellow prisoners. Prison officials consider him an incorrigibly hostile inmate. Because of his refusal to follow orders and his alleged assaults on guards, Taylor spent seven years in solitary confinement at the state penitentiary at Huntingdon. Two years ago, he was moved to an even more restrictive home. Taylor, 39, who is serving a life sentence for murder, became one of the first residents of Pennsylvania's new Special Management Unit (SMU)
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
SHE IS: Madeline Arrington SHE DOES: Housing rehab SHE SUCCEEDS: Through determination At first, Madeline Arrington wasn't sure she wanted it mentioned in the newspapers that before taking on her current post as an apartment building manager, she spent time in jail. But, on second thought, Arrington decided she had important messages to get out: About how quickly your life can fall apart. About picking up the pieces of your life and starting again. In 1982, Arrington, then 39 years old, a single mother of two daughters, then aged 18 and 9, made what turned out to be a fateful decision.
NEWS
September 10, 2003
RE THE LETTER by Lauren Ukkerd of Broomall, "Dial P for Prison" (Aug. 16): Who or what gives her the right to judge letter-writer Harum Fox, let alone anybody else who's incarcerated about what we should or shouldn't have in prison without knowing our situation. Unfortunately, people fail to realize that not everyone incarcerated is a bad person, some of us just made bad choices and the wrong decisions in our lives that we are paying for now - and our families are paying for them as well.
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
When Ryshaone Thomas was sent to prison in 2005, Linda Reis was outraged that one of the men who abducted, beat and strangled her daughter might be free someday. Reis wanted Thomas, 32, to die in prison. On Sunday morning, she got her wish. "It's funny how God works," said Reis, 54, of Mount Ephraim, N.J. "I really feel that things happen for many reasons. " Thomas, of Camden, was serving a 43-year sentence for the murder of Reis' daughter, Christine Eberle, on Nov. 12, 2001.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Jerry Sandusky became a state prison inmate Tuesday with his transfer out of the Centre County jail, his home since he was convicted in June of child molestation. The former Pennsylvania State University assistant coach arrived early in the morning at the State Correctional Institute at Camp Hill, just outside Harrisburg, a state prison system spokeswoman said. He faces evaluation that will take a week or more before he can be assigned a security-risk level and sent to one of the state facilities as his "home" prison.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Morrisville man pleaded guilty yesterday to a weeklong crime spree in which he stole at least five vehicles, drove one into the Delaware Canal, and escaped police custody through a bathroom window. Jesse N. Baker, 21, was given four sentences to state prison - with terms ranging from one to two years, to two to five years - for a string of auto thefts and other crimes in early June. Bucks County President Judge Kenneth G. Biehn said Baker would serve the sentences concurrently.
NEWS
January 4, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Msgr. William J. Lynn was released from state prison Thursday, but before he returns to private life, he must again face the judge who put him behind bars. After serving about 18 months in prison, Lynn left the prison in Waymart, in Northeastern Pennsylvania, on Thursday, a week after an appeals court overturned his child-endangerment conviction. Prosecutors are challenging the decision. On Monday, Lynn is to appear before Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina, who in 2012 sentenced him to three to six years in prison for his role in enabling priests to abuse children.
NEWS
May 6, 2009 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth "Betty" Greenawalt embezzled more than $900,000 from her long-time employer and neighbor, robbing him of money that he could have taken into his retirement. Ralph Bucci went to Delaware County Court yesterday for Greenawalt's sentencing. Instead of seeking revenge, he offered forgiveness. "I do not seek a prison sentence on my behalf," Bucci told Judge James F. Nilon Jr. Joan Bucci, his wife, called it a difficult day for her. She mentioned Greenawalt's gambling addiction and said Greenawalt's actions had hurt the family emotionally and financially.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 2, 2015 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Msgr. William J. Lynn, the first Catholic Church official convicted in the clergy sex-abuse scandal, returned to prison Thursday after a Philadelphia judge ordered him to resume his sentence for child endangerment. Lynn, 64, was taken to the Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, about four miles across Northeast Philadelphia from the rectory of St. William parish in Crescentville, where he had lived on house arrest since January 2014. Lynn's lawyer, Thomas A. Bergstrom, said he would challenge Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina's ruling.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
A COMMON PLEAS judge yesterday ordered Monsignor William Lynn - the nation's first Catholic Church official convicted of endangering children in his role as a supervisor - back to prison. Lynn, 64, dressed in a white turtleneck, gray sweatshirt and blue jeans, his pink-hued face appearing rounder than it did when he was released from prison in January 2014, seemed resigned to his fate. During the half-hour hearing before Judge M. Teresa Sarmina, Lynn solemnly looked in front of him, his head bowed, his hands clasped on the defense table.
NEWS
April 10, 2015 | BY ABBY CRUZ, Daily News Staff Writer cruza@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
AMIN GIBBS, 35, of Southwest Philadelphia, a man who has spent much of his life in prison, let his anger get the best of him yesterday. "Lies, lies, lies!" he shouted as he was sentenced in Common Pleas Court to 17 1/2 to 35 years in state prison after being convicted of aggravated assault and weapons offenses in an October 2012 shooting in West Philadelphia. He had to be restrained and then was forcibly removed from the courtroom. In November 2012, Gibbs was accused of being the gunman who killed college student Zykia Sanders, 22, in a shooting in which she was a bystander.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JESSE KRIMES, an artist from Lancaster County, was sentenced in 2009 to five years in federal prison for possession of powdered cocaine with intent to distribute. His new neighbors were the Aryan Brotherhood, the Mexican Mafia and other prison gangs. "I thought to myself, 'Where the hell am I?' " said Krimes, 32, a free man since last year, sitting in his Spring Garden studio in Olivet Covenant Church's former Sunday school. "I asked myself, 'How am I going to survive?' " He survived for a year at the Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, N.C., by drawing portraits of gang members, who sent them home to their loved ones.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
HE SAT for hours, handcuffed with his head hanging low, at the defense table. When he finally spoke, he told the judge he was ashamed, owned his wrongdoing and vowed to make restitution, even if it took him decades. But when deputies led disgraced ex-sportscaster Don Tollefson away to begin a two- to four-year sentence in state prison for fleecing $342,643 from 200 people (most of whom were donors to his charities), many of his victims in attendance trudged out of court scowling with disgust.
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
TO HER FAMILY, 16-year-old Zaria Estes is a "considerate and caring" girl who likes tuna fish and dancing and doesn't always keep her room clean. But to Abbey Luffey's family, Estes is the cold and calculating monster who attacked Luffey, a Temple University student, last March as Luffey walked with her boyfriend on the edge of campus. As she and her friends hunted prey for their sadistic game of "knock a bitch down," Estes bashed Luffey in the face with a brick, leaving her with a broken jaw, palate and teeth - and a shattered sense of security.
NEWS
December 15, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE UNDERAGE GIRLS who attended booze-and-drug-fueled parties at Tawfik Nakishbendi's Manayunk home called him "Doc" and "Sugar Daddy," but the state has determined that "sexually violent predator" is a better moniker. Nakishbendi, 65, a small, balding man, pleaded guilty in two sexual-assault cases in Common Pleas Court yesterday and was sentenced to five to 12 years in state prison and 10 years' probation. He was determined to be a sexually violent predator and will be required to register as such for the rest of his life, under Megan's Law. Nakishbendi tried to give reason to his creepy actions by telling Judge Gwendolyn Bright that he was distraught after his wife's suicide in 2006 and sought "refuge in anything.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were many times during Khasiem Carr's tumultuous journey through Pennsylvania's mental health and prison systems when it seemed things couldn't get worse. Then, they generally did. For instance, after two months in solitary confinement at the Bucks County prison, Carr was refusing food and water, and was rushed to the hospital to be treated for dehydration and malnutrition. After more than a year in solitary, he entered a guilty plea in hope of getting out of the hole and into mental-health care in a state prison.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is seeking to overturn a new state law that allows violent-crime victims to sue offenders whose speech continues to cause them "mental anguish. " In a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Harrisburg, Abu-Jamal's lawyers said the measure - signed in October - violates the First Amendment rights of prisoners and was specifically targeted to silence him. Abu-Jamal, 60, is serving a life sentence at a state prison in Schuylkill County for the 1981 shooting death of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
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