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State Prison

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NEWS
October 26, 1995 | by Kitty Caparella and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
The massive raid at Graterford state prison earlier this week grabbed the attention of the outside world, but the biggest show of force was the quiet, hurried transfer of a dozen inmates who wielded the real power inside the prison walls. More than the unprecedented raid by 650 state troopers and prison guards, more than the forced retirement of two top prison officials, more than the strip-searches of the 3,490 inmates and the cell-by-cell shakedown for drugs and weapons, the biggest symbol of change was the dethroning of the reputed leader of prison wheeling-and-dealing.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | By Stephanie Doster INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A former Philadelphia paratransit driver convicted of raping a woman with cerebral palsy was sentenced in Bucks County Court Friday to serve 20 to 40 years in state prison. David Desouza, 49, sat motionless as Judge Alan M. Rubenstein sentenced him to two consecutive 10- to 20-year terms for rape and involuntary deviate sexual intercourse. Rubenstein cited the crime's "heinousness, its sheer, unbridled depravity, and the absolute horror visited upon the victim. " Rubenstein told Desouza: "You probably believed she would never tell anyone about this, and if she did, no one would believe her. . . . But she was not the perfect victim.
NEWS
July 25, 1994 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Taylor considers himself a man who stands up for his rights and those of his fellow prisoners. Prison officials consider him an incorrigibly hostile inmate. Because of his refusal to follow orders and his alleged assaults on guards, Taylor spent seven years in solitary confinement at the state penitentiary at Huntingdon. Two years ago, he was moved to an even more restrictive home. Taylor, 39, who is serving a life sentence for murder, became one of the first residents of Pennsylvania's new Special Management Unit (SMU)
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
SHE IS: Madeline Arrington SHE DOES: Housing rehab SHE SUCCEEDS: Through determination At first, Madeline Arrington wasn't sure she wanted it mentioned in the newspapers that before taking on her current post as an apartment building manager, she spent time in jail. But, on second thought, Arrington decided she had important messages to get out: About how quickly your life can fall apart. About picking up the pieces of your life and starting again. In 1982, Arrington, then 39 years old, a single mother of two daughters, then aged 18 and 9, made what turned out to be a fateful decision.
NEWS
September 10, 2003
RE THE LETTER by Lauren Ukkerd of Broomall, "Dial P for Prison" (Aug. 16): Who or what gives her the right to judge letter-writer Harum Fox, let alone anybody else who's incarcerated about what we should or shouldn't have in prison without knowing our situation. Unfortunately, people fail to realize that not everyone incarcerated is a bad person, some of us just made bad choices and the wrong decisions in our lives that we are paying for now - and our families are paying for them as well.
NEWS
July 7, 2010 | By JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 856-779-3231
When Ryshaone Thomas was sent to prison in 2005, Linda Reis was outraged that one of the men who abducted, beat and strangled her daughter might be free someday. Reis wanted Thomas, 32, to die in prison. On Sunday morning, she got her wish. "It's funny how God works," said Reis, 54, of Mount Ephraim, N.J. "I really feel that things happen for many reasons. " Thomas, of Camden, was serving a 43-year sentence for the murder of Reis' daughter, Christine Eberle, on Nov. 12, 2001.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Jerry Sandusky became a state prison inmate Tuesday with his transfer out of the Centre County jail, his home since he was convicted in June of child molestation. The former Pennsylvania State University assistant coach arrived early in the morning at the State Correctional Institute at Camp Hill, just outside Harrisburg, a state prison system spokeswoman said. He faces evaluation that will take a week or more before he can be assigned a security-risk level and sent to one of the state facilities as his "home" prison.
NEWS
January 14, 1998 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Morrisville man pleaded guilty yesterday to a weeklong crime spree in which he stole at least five vehicles, drove one into the Delaware Canal, and escaped police custody through a bathroom window. Jesse N. Baker, 21, was given four sentences to state prison - with terms ranging from one to two years, to two to five years - for a string of auto thefts and other crimes in early June. Bucks County President Judge Kenneth G. Biehn said Baker would serve the sentences concurrently.
NEWS
January 4, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Msgr. William J. Lynn was released from state prison Thursday, but before he returns to private life, he must again face the judge who put him behind bars. After serving about 18 months in prison, Lynn left the prison in Waymart, in Northeastern Pennsylvania, on Thursday, a week after an appeals court overturned his child-endangerment conviction. Prosecutors are challenging the decision. On Monday, Lynn is to appear before Common Pleas Court Judge M. Teresa Sarmina, who in 2012 sentenced him to three to six years in prison for his role in enabling priests to abuse children.
NEWS
May 6, 2009 | By Mari A. Schaefer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth "Betty" Greenawalt embezzled more than $900,000 from her long-time employer and neighbor, robbing him of money that he could have taken into his retirement. Ralph Bucci went to Delaware County Court yesterday for Greenawalt's sentencing. Instead of seeking revenge, he offered forgiveness. "I do not seek a prison sentence on my behalf," Bucci told Judge James F. Nilon Jr. Joan Bucci, his wife, called it a difficult day for her. She mentioned Greenawalt's gambling addiction and said Greenawalt's actions had hurt the family emotionally and financially.
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NEWS
December 15, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
THE UNDERAGE GIRLS who attended booze-and-drug-fueled parties at Tawfik Nakishbendi's Manayunk home called him "Doc" and "Sugar Daddy," but the state has determined that "sexually violent predator" is a better moniker. Nakishbendi, 65, a small, balding man, pleaded guilty in two sexual-assault cases in Common Pleas Court yesterday and was sentenced to five to 12 years in state prison and 10 years' probation. He was determined to be a sexually violent predator and will be required to register as such for the rest of his life, under Megan's Law. Nakishbendi tried to give reason to his creepy actions by telling Judge Gwendolyn Bright that he was distraught after his wife's suicide in 2006 and sought "refuge in anything.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
There were many times during Khasiem Carr's tumultuous journey through Pennsylvania's mental health and prison systems when it seemed things couldn't get worse. Then, they generally did. For instance, after two months in solitary confinement at the Bucks County prison, Carr was refusing food and water, and was rushed to the hospital to be treated for dehydration and malnutrition. After more than a year in solitary, he entered a guilty plea in hope of getting out of the hole and into mental-health care in a state prison.
NEWS
November 12, 2014 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Convicted cop killer Mumia Abu-Jamal is seeking to overturn a new state law that allows violent-crime victims to sue offenders whose speech continues to cause them "mental anguish. " In a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Harrisburg, Abu-Jamal's lawyers said the measure - signed in October - violates the First Amendment rights of prisoners and was specifically targeted to silence him. Abu-Jamal, 60, is serving a life sentence at a state prison in Schuylkill County for the 1981 shooting death of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
October 16, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former NFL star and Eagles wide receiver Irving Fryar is heading to trial with his 72-year-old mother early next year in connection with an alleged $704,000 mortgage scam. Burlington County Superior Court Judge Jeanne T. Covert set a trial date of Feb. 3 after Fryar and Allene McGhee rejected plea offers Tuesday that would have required them to admit to charges of theft by deception and to serve five years and three years, respectively, in state prison. The two also would have been ordered to repay the banks that were defrauded, according to the state Attorney General's Office, which is prosecuting the case.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 25-year-old man was sentenced to 20 to 40 years in state prison after pleading guilty Friday to shooting his former friend to death in Malvern in November. Merritt Neil Dudas pleaded guilty to third-degree murder in the Nov. 15 incident. The killing was the first reported in the small borough of about 3,400 people since a domestic dispute in 1996. Dudas shot 21-year-old Drew Alan Ferguson in the head with a .380-caliber Ruger handgun, stuffed his body in a sleeping bag, and hid the body in a detached garage at the house the victim shared with his grandmother in the 200 block of Miner Street, police said.
NEWS
August 17, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
CALVIN GADSON, a Germantown man who robbed a teenage couple and raped the girl in 1998 but was not arrested until 2010 when DNA evidence linked him to the crimes, fought back tears yesterday after being sentenced to 32 1/2 to 65 years in state prison. "I'm not perfect," Gadson, 38, said before learning his fate from Common Pleas Judge Giovanni O. Campbell. "I just ask for a little bit of leniency so I can see my five children grow up. " But Gadson's children - who are ages 6 to 17 - will be long grown by the time he is eligible for parole.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
BACK IN April 2008, Kenneth Wiggins, 19, stole more than $1,000 from Qentin Salmond during a dice game in Germantown. Three days later, Salmond, his brother Bernard and their friend Jamil Baynes got revenge on Wiggins in broad daylight. Just before 1 p.m., as Wiggins left Skyline Restaurant on Chew Avenue near Chelten, Qentin Salmond, disguised in a Muslim woman's outfit, and Baynes, wielding a handgun, approached from behind and shoved him to the ground. Baynes then opened fire, fatally shooting Wiggins in the chest.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
LARRY STEPHENSON was 6 and his brother Darren was 5 when the father who was always present in their lives suddenly wasn't. They wondered about the steel bars when they traveled to visit him in a place their mother called "college. " But their young minds rationalized that there were signs for Cheyney University on the way, and their father did always greet them with math and reading tests. "It felt like an after-school program," Larry recalled, laughing. Only later did the brothers realize those tests were from a course for fellow inmates at Broadmeadows Prison.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
RAHMIK BECKETT humbly apologized yesterday for fatally shooting a man whom he believed was going to kill him, and for shooting at two Philadelphia police officers who happened upon the slaying. "It haunts me every time I close my eyes," said Beckett, 25, a former airport baggage handler. A jury in February convicted him of voluntary manslaughter, assault on a police officer and three handgun offenses. Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Rose Marie DeFino-Nastasi sentenced him to 20 to 40 years in state prison.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
SOMETIMES criminals evade detection by police and the media, even when they commit a series of savage assaults. That was the case with Matthew Jones, 30, who pleaded guilty in July to raping and battering four women in Frankford between May 2007 and his arrest in August 2012. Yesterday, Common Pleas Judge Donna Woelpper sentenced Jones to 35 to 100 years in state prison, noting the violence he had inflicted on his victims and calling him a danger to society and a poor candidate for rehabilitation.
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