CollectionsSteam
IN THE NEWS

Steam

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Center City steam loop, source of the Dickensian sidewalk vapor clouds that have warmed the soles of generations of pedestrians, does not normally evoke images of a modern energy system. But in the last two years, the system's owner, Veolia Energy, has quietly upgraded its century-old power plant in Grays Ferry to reposition the nation's third-largest district heating system as an environmentally friendly energy source. Veolia is calling it "green steam. " On Monday, Mayor Nutter and Robert F. Powelson, chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC)
NEWS
July 10, 1988 | By Steve Birnbaum , Special to The Inquirer
You once wrote about historic steam locomotives around the country that still take passengers on special trips. My husband is a railroad buff, and we are going to Britain and wondered if they have this type of train trip there. Also, can you suggest any day trips from London? Although steam trains officially departed from the British scene 20 years ago, it still is possible to take a ride on one of these delightful old trains, now privately owned. One excursion takes passengers on the Pennine Limited on six Wednesdays during the summer.
SPORTS
December 28, 2003 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Matt Keith and Ajay Baines scored goals in the first period to give the Norfolk Admirals a lead they never relinquished on the way to a 3-2 victory over the Phantoms last night in an AHL game in Norfolk, Va. Baines' second goal of the night, which came 6 minutes, 53 seconds into the third period, extended Norfolk's lead to 3-1. Defenseman Randy Jones scored for the Phantoms with two seconds left in the game. Freddy Meyer's power-play goal enabled the Phantoms to stay close to the Admirals at 2-1. It was the only score of the second period, coming with less than three minutes remaining.
NEWS
May 1, 1991 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / GERALD S. WILLIAMS
Clouds of steam set fire alarms wailing at City Hall yesterday. The building was evacuated and firefighters rushed to investigate. Fire officials said faulty venting of the building's heating and cooling system allowed steam to escape into the corridors. Workers returned after a 40-minute break.
NEWS
September 26, 1988 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two civilian maintenance workers at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard were scalded to death yesterday morning by 350-degree steam as they attempted to open an underground valve at the South Philadelphia facility. The medical examiner's office identified the victims as Charles Carlson, 42, of the 1000 block of Tree Street in South Philadelphia, and Ted Shaw, 28, of the 1900 block of Mayland Road in West Oak Lane. A spokesman for the shipyard said the pair had noticed that steam needed to power machinery was not reaching its destinations throughout the shipyard.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Howard W. Serig Jr., Special to The Inquirer
"Once this was the steam locomotive capital of the world," laments Ron Tapke, gesturing toward the sprawling yet largely empty Union Pacific rail yards here. Thirty years ago, before the diesels came, Cheyenne was the staging point for fleets of long-boilered steamers that slogged long freight and passenger trains up the steep mountain grades toward the Continental Divide. The giant articulateds - engines with two sets of drive wheels riding under an enormous boiler - were a U.P. tradition.
NEWS
October 22, 2001 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
Sum 41, the reigning kings of fresh-scrubbed pop punk, offer plenty of ammunition for their detractors. But at Friday's show at the Electric Factory, the Toronto outfit proved it could pull off one hour's worth of loud, spanking rock-and-roll and make the very young, capacity crowd believe it - which in today's pop world is more impressive than it sounds. Sum 41 is four bratty, brazen, and basically good-natured suburbanites who have chosen punk's (and metal's) spectacle as a way of letting off steam.
NEWS
April 2, 1987 | By Bill G. Lowe, Special to The Inquirer
Taylor Hospital has been granted a zoning variance that permits it to build a gas-fired steam and electricity generating facility next to the hospital on Bartol Avenue. The Ridley Park Zoning Hearing Board voted, 3-0, last week to allow Taylor Hospital to construct the plant 4 feet, 10 inches from the adjacent right of way. The borough zoning code requires a setback of 20 feet. Charles Neely, president of the Borough Council, said he was comfortable with changes in the plant's design and other conditions agreed to by hospital officials.
SPORTS
November 5, 1997 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On his weekly radio show last night, Eagles fullback Kevin Turner explained his presence at a pro wrestling event Monday night at the CoreStates Spectrum by saying he needed to "blow a little steam off" after the Birds' embarrassing loss to the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday. Turner, who committed four costly penalties in the defeat, said he went with center Steve Everitt and right tackle Barrett Brooks. Early yesterday morning, Everitt was arrested in Mount Laurel and charged with speeding, driving under the influence and possession of drug paraphernalia.
FOOD
March 5, 1989 | By Leslie Land, Special to The Inquirer
It's easy to get cranky about modern American supermarket vegetables, raised more for beauty than for flavor, weeks out of the soil by the time they are sold, tainted by who knows what assortment of biocides. On the other hand, a recent trip to the Caribbean has convinced me that it's mighty hard to do without them. I ate in Santo Domingo and ate well: the smooth, tart tropical fruits called soursops, fragrant pineapples, deep-flavored bananas unlike any that are sold here. There were crisp-crusted yuca fritters, crunchy casabe bread, and creamy, long-simmered beans.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 10, 2015
Ken Giles' fastball has yet to reach triple digits this season. The Phillies reliever has not lived up to his "100 Miles Giles" nickname. But, "95 Miles Giles" has proven effective despite his fastball's decreased velocity. "100 miles per hour is just a luxury thing," Giles said. "I'm still 95-96. Who cares? I'm going to be more effective if I learn how to pitch. That's how I get out. Not blowing guys away. It's learning how to pitch. " Giles' fastball has averaged this season at 94.7 m.p.h., according to Pitchf/x data.
BUSINESS
January 12, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's getting personal. Billionaire investor Nelson Peltz accelerated his two-year campaign to break up the DuPont Co. last week by naming himself and three allies to run against CEO and chair Ellen Kullman and her backers, when shareholders vote in April. Peltz wants more, deeper, and faster management cuts, a breakup of DuPont into smaller chunks he thinks will make faster profits for shareholders, and closer scrutiny of research and development spending. The Kullman board shot back with an existential defense of the 200-year-old, Wilmington-based global manufacturer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Several nationalist groups in Japan have called for the country to ban Angelina Jolie because of her film Unbroken , which, they claim, represents Japanese officers during WWII in a negative light. Jolie's film tells the story of real-life Olympian Louis Zamperini , an Army Air Forces second lieutenant taken prisoner by the Japanese. One scene has an imperial officer named Mutsuhiro Watanabe mercilessly beating the American. The film is based on Laura Hillenbrand 's biography of the same name and Zamperini's own accounts.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After seven years of deadline writing for newspapers, Bryon MacWilliams quit his reporting job and moved to Russia. He knew only one of the nearly 150 million people who lived there. He couldn't speak Russian, either. He was 30. "I knew I wanted to live more in the moment . . . and write, perhaps essays or short fiction," said MacWilliams, who departed for Moscow in 1996. "I just knew it was time for me to go," he added. And when he returned after a dozen years, "I knew the last part of the journey was this book.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty, For The Inquirer
STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. - For the last few years, ski resorts in cowboy country - and the skiers who love them - have been riding a bucking bronc. Huge dumps of snow blanketed slopes in the up years; in down years, late snow and warmer days cast a pall over the industry. At Steamboat Resort, in western Colorado, hard-core skiers were over the moon in 2008 when monster storms dropped 433 inches of snow on the slopes. But disbelief followed when the next winter brought fewer, weaker storms and half as much snow.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
One in an occasional series on America's changing face. Grigory Konkin hurls a pail's worth of water into the huge, hellishly hot brick oven. Steam too hot to fog diffuses in the room as men and women in bathing suits file in. Banya veterans scurry to the highest of its three benches, where the temperature can exceed 200 degrees. Some wear felt hats to prevent scalps from scorching. Some carry veniki , soaked branches used to whip skin to a rosy hue, increasing the sensation of heat.
SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Camden Catholic football coach Nick Strom says he watches his language around his team. "We don't use the 'H' word," Strom said. Every other South Jersey team is allowed to say the word huddle . But fewer and fewer are doing it. It's one thing for a young, innovative first-year coach such as Strom or an iconoclast such as Pennsville's Ryan Wood or a mad scientist of an offensive coordinator such as Paul VI's Russ Horton to feature...
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
WITH A projected $125 million opening weekend and an incredible 94 percent "fresh" rating on RottenTomatoes, it appears "X-Men: Days of Future Past" is set to not only revive the mutant franchise but take it to new heights. Fox certainly has confidence in the film, as there has been talk among producers that "Days Of Future Past" could lead to as many as 10 new or rejuvenated X-film franchises. These include already-confirmed "X-Men: Apocalypse" in 2016, a third "Wolverine" film starring Hugh Jackman in 2017 and a "Gambit" solo film starring Channing Tatum.
SPORTS
May 9, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
ROBBINSVILLE, N.J. - Sectional title games in boys' and girls' basketball will be held on neutral courts at area colleges starting in 2016, according to a plan forwarded this week by the NJSIAA basketball committee. NJSIAA director Larry White said Wednesday the committee wants to implement the change in 2016 rather than 2015 to allow schools time to adjust schedules, especially with regard to the highly popular county tournaments in North and Central Jersey, as well as conference tournaments such as the Cape-Atlantic League's annual tournament.
NEWS
March 23, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If 2011 had a signature soul sister, it was Marsha Ambrosius. The Philadelphia (by way of Liverpool) singer, songwriter, and one-time member of the rap-and-R&B outfit Floetry released her solo debut, Late Nights & Early Mornings, in March 2011. The album debuted at No. 1 on Billboard's R&B Charts, No. 2 on the Top 200 Album Chart, each live show was more silken and passionate than the last, and Ambrosius far outran the typecasting of neo-soul that Floetry brought. Like Phyllis Hyman without the tragic torchiness, Ambrosius' voice and lyrics spoke cattily of wronged romance and haughtily of sour times with jazzy aplomb and salty tenderness.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|