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Steam Heat

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BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Center City steam loop, source of the Dickensian sidewalk vapor clouds that have warmed the soles of generations of pedestrians, does not normally evoke images of a modern energy system. But in the last two years, the system's owner, Veolia Energy, has quietly upgraded its century-old power plant in Grays Ferry to reposition the nation's third-largest district heating system as an environmentally friendly energy source. Veolia is calling it "green steam. " On Monday, Mayor Nutter and Robert F. Powelson, chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC)
FOOD
April 3, 2008 | By Amy Culbertson, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Stovetop. Microwave. Bags. What's the best method of getting crisp and flavorful veggies? We test them all. There's no cooking method better than steaming if you want to taste the pure essence of a vegetable. And it's the healthful way to go - nutrients aren't boiled away, and no fat is involved. Grocery shelves are filled with new steaming options designed for convenience: plastic microwave steaming bags, freezer-to-microwave packages, even steaming bags with their own seasoning mix. We decided to stage a steam-off to find out how the new methods compared with traditional microwaving and steaming on the stove.
FOOD
April 14, 1993 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Steam can be a deceiving element of cooking. It masquerades as microwaving and also plays a mysterious role within the skin of a humble baked potato. For most of its cooking life, it is the unseen "ingredient. " If your vision of steaming is limited to a perforated platform perched over boiling water, look again. It is steam, trapped under a bubble of plastic wrap, that cooks the green beans or fish filet or frozen entree in your microwave. It is steam that "braises" the chicken in a clay cooker and stokes the heat of the stuffing inside your Thanksgiving turkey.
FOOD
June 3, 1990 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Lost in a mist of convalescent cookery, the reality of steaming is not as vaporous as it seems. Few cooks realize that steaming is the backbone of many techniques that form the basis of the modern kitchen. Everything from microwaving to pot roasting to baking in parchment is little more than steaming by another name. When let loose, steam will gently warm and perfume foods with a scent of herbs or an acrid accent of wine, but trap it under pressure, and steam becomes a high-powered heat source that can zap raw ingredients to perfect doneness in minutes.
NEWS
October 11, 1988 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The steam heat will remain off in the swimming pool at the financially troubled Philadelphia YWCA in Center City for at least several more days because of the Y's inability to pay its bill. Tony Porter, controller at Philadelphia Thermal Corp., which supplies the steam heat, said he met yesterday morning with Mildred F. Johnson, executive director of the YWCA, in an effort to get the heat turned back on. "We are working with her to try to resolve the matter; we don't have a specific agreement," Porter said.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1986 | By FREDERICK H. LOWE, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. announced yesterday that it has agreed to sell its troubled steam-loop system to a New York firm for $30 million, only two months after utility company officials said the sharp drop in oil prices made it more attractive to keep the facility. William B. Morlock, PE's vice president for commercial operations, said the utility decided to sell the loop that supplies steam heat to 100 buildings in Center City, including the University of Pennsylvania and Amtrak's 30th Street train station, to Catalyst Energy Development because the loop represented less than 1 percent of PE's more than $2 billion a year in revenue.
NEWS
September 14, 1989 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
About 25 buildings in Center City were without steam service for several hours this morning when a steam line ruptured on 15th Street near Callowhill shortly before 4 a.m. In addition to interrupting service - and traffic - the blast showered rocks and mud on cars parked in the area. No one was injured. Among the institutions affected were Hahenmann University Hospital, Community College of Philadelphia and the Masterman school. Steve Smith, general manager of Philadelphia Thermal Energy Corp.
NEWS
December 13, 1988 | By Gloria Campisi and Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writers
Relax. No more single-digit cold is in view, probably for at least the rest of the week. On the other hand, there definitely is snow in the picture, but not much. The white stuff is expected to start falling here sometime in the afternoon and end before midnight with an accumulation described by Accu-Weather meteorologist Alex Sosnowski as "somewhere between a coating and an inch. " A cloud cover that moved in overnight served as an insulating blanket and kept our temperatures from dropping as low as they had yesterday, when a record-shattering 8 degrees was recorded.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Tennessee Williams' lurid play about sex and God and art and domineering Southern mothers, Suddenly Last Summer, is having an unconvincing Off-Broadway revival, despite a fine performance by Blythe Danner. Lacking in psychosexual urgency and floundering around in very stagey acting, the production, directed by Mark Brokaw, never generates any of the steam heat the play requires. The scene opens in an old New Orleans garden, a set Williams describes as "more like a tropical jungle . . . in the prehistoric age of giant fern-forests.
REAL_ESTATE
December 3, 1999 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Times change. Consider the Newport Apartments: 100 years ago, this historically significant nine-story building was deemed a high-rise - one of the first in Philadelphia. Today, the Newport, on the corner of 16th and Spruce Streets, may not be considered very tall, but it more than makes up for its stature with its rich, eclectic architectural details. There is a massive, arched, brownstone frontispiece at the main entrance on Spruce Street and unusual, copper-clad bays and box-bays on the 16th Street facade.
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BUSINESS
January 14, 2013 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Center City steam loop, source of the Dickensian sidewalk vapor clouds that have warmed the soles of generations of pedestrians, does not normally evoke images of a modern energy system. But in the last two years, the system's owner, Veolia Energy, has quietly upgraded its century-old power plant in Grays Ferry to reposition the nation's third-largest district heating system as an environmentally friendly energy source. Veolia is calling it "green steam. " On Monday, Mayor Nutter and Robert F. Powelson, chairman of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
While we're a week away from summer, musicians are already on the case with new collections designed to see you through the heat - emotional as well, um Fahrenheital. FRANKS SPEAKING: Nobody is capturing the moment in breezier fashion than jazz-attuned popster Michael Franks with "Time Together" (Shanachie, A-) . Not much has changed in his sound orschtick through the years, except now Frank is singing with a certain nostalgic air on sunny, bossa-nova flavored ditties like "One Day in St. Tropez" or the touching "If I Could Make September Stay," his variation on Sinatra's hit "September of My Years.
FOOD
April 3, 2008 | By Amy Culbertson, FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
Stovetop. Microwave. Bags. What's the best method of getting crisp and flavorful veggies? We test them all. There's no cooking method better than steaming if you want to taste the pure essence of a vegetable. And it's the healthful way to go - nutrients aren't boiled away, and no fat is involved. Grocery shelves are filled with new steaming options designed for convenience: plastic microwave steaming bags, freezer-to-microwave packages, even steaming bags with their own seasoning mix. We decided to stage a steam-off to find out how the new methods compared with traditional microwaving and steaming on the stove.
NEWS
November 16, 2006 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Tennessee Williams' lurid play about sex and God and art and domineering Southern mothers, Suddenly Last Summer, is having an unconvincing Off-Broadway revival, despite a fine performance by Blythe Danner. Lacking in psychosexual urgency and floundering around in very stagey acting, the production, directed by Mark Brokaw, never generates any of the steam heat the play requires. The scene opens in an old New Orleans garden, a set Williams describes as "more like a tropical jungle . . . in the prehistoric age of giant fern-forests.
REAL_ESTATE
December 3, 1999 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Times change. Consider the Newport Apartments: 100 years ago, this historically significant nine-story building was deemed a high-rise - one of the first in Philadelphia. Today, the Newport, on the corner of 16th and Spruce Streets, may not be considered very tall, but it more than makes up for its stature with its rich, eclectic architectural details. There is a massive, arched, brownstone frontispiece at the main entrance on Spruce Street and unusual, copper-clad bays and box-bays on the 16th Street facade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
If you were a theater buff back in those heady days when New York had seven theater critics filing newspaper reviews of every opening, your morning-after routine was always the same. First, you read six of the critics to see what they said. Then you read Walter Kerr to see what he said and - this was the good part - to savor how he said it. No other American critic wrote about the theater with the grace, panache, wit, and painterly exuberance of Walter Kerr, who died Wednesday in a New York nursing home at the age of 83. From 1951 until his retirement in 1983, first at the New York Herald Tribune and later at the New York Times, Kerr transformed the craft of criticism into something very like an art. He was a choreographer among critics, setting words to dancing down a newspaper column in the service of the higher art he so evidently worshiped.
FOOD
April 14, 1993 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Steam can be a deceiving element of cooking. It masquerades as microwaving and also plays a mysterious role within the skin of a humble baked potato. For most of its cooking life, it is the unseen "ingredient. " If your vision of steaming is limited to a perforated platform perched over boiling water, look again. It is steam, trapped under a bubble of plastic wrap, that cooks the green beans or fish filet or frozen entree in your microwave. It is steam that "braises" the chicken in a clay cooker and stokes the heat of the stuffing inside your Thanksgiving turkey.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | by Dave Davies and Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writers
Sex in bathhouses, raids on bookstores. What's safe? What's legal? Should the city be taking notes on what gay men do in steam rooms? Five days after Mayor Rendell learned of a city effort to monitor sex practices at Center City bathhouses, public officials are struggling to define their roles in regulating commercial sex establishments: The director of the private group that monitored bathhouse conduct for the city said his people...
REAL_ESTATE
July 12, 1992 | By Sally A. Downey, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Neighbors who lived in sturdy houses of brick and stone were meeting to save a fragile wooden house. The neighbors were residents of Overbrook Farms, a community of large homes on either side of the Main Line tracks of the former Pennsylvania Railroad, just inside Philadelphia's city limits. At the meeting of the Overbrook Farms Club, the local civic association, they were eagerly signing petitions and discussing ways to save the Overbrook Train Station House. After all, the station was the reason for the community's existence.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1990 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
A visit to a dentist's office always begins with the same scene: The dentist washes his hands and - at least since AIDS became a widespread public concern - slips on a pair of surgical gloves. But patients rarely give a second thought to whether a dentist's tools are sterile. "Most people take it for granted that when they're in a health-care facility, they can trust that things are sterile," says Jenkintown orthodontist Michael Roth. Roth and his partner, Gary Udis, thought they could be doing a better job in this area.
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