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Steel Guitar

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NEWS
September 22, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The steel guitar is a thing of diverse beauty. The lap steel and the pedal steel can be roused to make primal howls or massaged to create subtle yawns. Whether they are part of Hawaiian music, gospel's sacred steel movement or country-western song, steel guitars can rage and murmur with delicious sliding sustain. Rock's best may get physical with their axes - pulling guitars' necks as if throttling the poor dears. But there is nothing like watching seated steel players tense their thumbs in anguish.
NEWS
December 31, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
SILVER SPRING, MD. - Mike Auldridge, a bluegrass musician whose broad knowledge of many musical forms helped redefine and modernize the steel guitar known as the Dobro, died Saturday, a day before his 74th birthday. He had prostate cancer, said a daughter, Michele Auldridge. Auldridge was a founding member of the Washington-based bluegrass group the Seldom Scene and, in a career spanning six decades, he recorded with Linda Ronstadt, Lyle Lovett and Emmylou Harris, among others. He was renowned for his mastery of the Dobro, a guitar with a metal resonator instead of a sound hole.
NEWS
June 29, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julian "Winnie" Winston, 64, an industrial-design teacher at the University of the Arts, folk musician, author, and leading homeopath, died June 12 of prostate cancer at home in Wellington, New Zealand. "Winnie Winston . . . was an important figure in the folk-music scene of the 1960s and 1970s. He played banjo and pedal steel guitar. . . . He recorded with Steve Goodman, David Bromberg, Rosalie Sorrels and David Grisman, and made records under his own name," radio host Terry Gross said Thursday on her show, Fresh Air. Raised in Yonkers, N.Y., Mr. Winston was the son of art teachers.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
SEAL WITH DRUMMER BRIAN BLADE, 8 p.m. Thursday, June 10, Mann Center for the Performing Arts, 52nd Street and Parkside Avenue. Tickets: $35-$45. Info: 215-336-2000. Drummer Brian Blade exemplifies the kind of young musician jazz is seeing more of these days, one equally at home playing rock, R&B, pop or jazz without any second thoughts. When confronted in the past, a jazz musician playing R&B or pop may have sounded apologetic, mumbling something like, "I'm only doing it for the money" or "My record company thought it was a good idea.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | By Jon Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Country-rock pioneer Gram Parsons spoke often of fashioning a new kind of music, a "cosmic American music" that wedded trippy '60s rock with the twangy torch songs of vintage, tear-in-your-beer country. Parsons died before realizing that vision, but bands such as Beachwood Sparks are proof that the torch has been passed. The Sparks' two albums - an eponymously titled debut and the just-out Once We Were Trees - are drowsy, sun-dappled collections of jangling, 12-string guitar arpeggios and starry-eyed harmonies shot through with Voxx organ psychedelia and spacy honky-tonk orchestration.
NEWS
April 30, 2003 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
On Monday at the Trocadero, the response of the sold-out, all-ages crowd to Bright Eyes and leader Conor Oberst felt ceremonial. Each song - the quivering "One Foot," the rumbling "A New Arrangement" - was greeted with a quietness usually reserved for whispered secrets. Bright Eyes' brand of aggressive though romantic imagery verges on being over the top. But as a lyricist and singer, Oberst avoids too much sentimentality, and ends up as cutting as early Dylan. At the Troc, he was flowery yet incisive, sounding like Robert Smith without the ironic ire, and remaining reserved as he bore down through the tribal drums and carnival organs of "The Calendar Hung Itself.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Kathy Mattea gets categorized as a country singer, but her husky, vibrato- less voice has more in common with those of British folk-soul women such as Sandy Denny, June Tabor and Linda Thompson than twangy Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette. It's a satisfying voice, especially when Mattea slips into her resonant lower range, and everything she sang Thursday night at the Valley Forge Music Fair sparkled with unaffected purity. Save for a weakness for treacly showstoppers (the geriatric romance "Where've You Been" and her pastoral take on the ditsy "From a Distance")
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If King Sunny Ade's Nigerian juju is all about polyrhythm and partying and proverbs, he handled his business at the Theatre of Living Arts Wednesday night. But the approach Ade and his big band took revealed a few deeper things about the Nigerian style that this Yoruba chieftain typifies. Sure, the percussion, especially the dundun drums, crackled, and the three-guitar array, with its swirling, conversational style, drew attention to the conflicting streams inside the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2011 | BY RON HARRIS, Associated Press
NOEL GALLAGHER has finally spread his post-Oasis wings and delivered a debut album with a band of his building, "Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds," (Sour Mash/Mercury). Gallagher gives us a comfortably acceptable sound, but something perhaps a little too close to his higher flying days with the hit-making Oasis. The thread of sonic continuity is undeniable and it appears there's nothing new under the Gallagher family umbrella of creativity here. Things start off nice enough with "Everybody's on the Run" and "Dream On," the latter built around a sturdy, marching cadence of drum and guitar strums.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1999 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
Breath and spirit are one, according to many traditional belief systems. Marlies Yearby's Movin' Spirits Dance Theater makes this connection plain. During her company's Friday performance at the Painted Bride (the last in its Sistah Diva Soothsayer festival of black women artists), the dancers' audible breaths directed their movements in a way that was fresh and, yes, inspiring. In-breaths pulled heads and shoulders back; long expirations folded two dancers together; and vocalized breaths often provided a rhythmic accompaniment.
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NEWS
December 31, 2012 | Daily News Wire Reports
SILVER SPRING, MD. - Mike Auldridge, a bluegrass musician whose broad knowledge of many musical forms helped redefine and modernize the steel guitar known as the Dobro, died Saturday, a day before his 74th birthday. He had prostate cancer, said a daughter, Michele Auldridge. Auldridge was a founding member of the Washington-based bluegrass group the Seldom Scene and, in a career spanning six decades, he recorded with Linda Ronstadt, Lyle Lovett and Emmylou Harris, among others. He was renowned for his mastery of the Dobro, a guitar with a metal resonator instead of a sound hole.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
After 17 years in the music business, Craig Finn thought he'd try doing things like a pro. That's not to say the Hold Steady front man is some kind of amateur. Over the course of five albums, leading up to 2010's Heaven Is Whenever, the Hold Steady have wooed both critics and audiences with Finn's Beat-poet lyrics and the band's fist-pumping anthems. But after the lackluster response to Heaven 's glossier sheen, Finn felt it was time to step away from his familiar Hold Steady collaborators and try his hand at the industrial grind of the songwriter-for-hire.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2011 | BY RON HARRIS, Associated Press
NOEL GALLAGHER has finally spread his post-Oasis wings and delivered a debut album with a band of his building, "Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds," (Sour Mash/Mercury). Gallagher gives us a comfortably acceptable sound, but something perhaps a little too close to his higher flying days with the hit-making Oasis. The thread of sonic continuity is undeniable and it appears there's nothing new under the Gallagher family umbrella of creativity here. Things start off nice enough with "Everybody's on the Run" and "Dream On," the latter built around a sturdy, marching cadence of drum and guitar strums.
NEWS
June 13, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Conor Oberst began growing up in public when he was 14 years old and established himself as a songwriting wunderkind with the band Commander Venus. And even when he was a boy, Oberst was a serious man. That's still true of the word slinger from Omaha, Neb., now 31, whose band Bright Eyes headlined a bill that also included M. Ward and Dawes at the Mann Center for the Performing Arts in Fairmount Park on Friday. Bright Eyes' nearly 21/2-hour, not-so-well-paced, career-spanning set reached back to 2000's Fevers and Mirrors for "The Calendar Hung Itself" and "Something Vague," but was rooted in The People's Key , the songwriter's first album under the Bright Eyes rubric since 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2010
MewithoutYou: Bracing and all embracing Philadelphia-spawned band combines nerdy vocals and catchy/experimental indie rock 'n' folk production (with occasional flourishes of trumpet, tuba, organ, mandolin, etc.) in the service of spiritually minded story songs drawing from Jewish, Muslim and Christian imagery. Their goal - to "open wide my door" of perception and faith. Convincing even for daydream believers. Kindred emocore spirits Murder By Death and Buried Beds share the night.
NEWS
September 22, 2008 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The steel guitar is a thing of diverse beauty. The lap steel and the pedal steel can be roused to make primal howls or massaged to create subtle yawns. Whether they are part of Hawaiian music, gospel's sacred steel movement or country-western song, steel guitars can rage and murmur with delicious sliding sustain. Rock's best may get physical with their axes - pulling guitars' necks as if throttling the poor dears. But there is nothing like watching seated steel players tense their thumbs in anguish.
NEWS
September 8, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Not to get all cosmic or anything, but there was something magically mysterious going on at Penn's Landing Friday night during the lengthy encore that capped My Morning Jacket's grandly ambitious two-hour, 45-minute set at the Festival Pier. The weather had held up for the last night of the Pier's summer concert series. But as bearded band leader Jim James sat down with a Frisbee-shaped keyboard to trigger the slinky electronic pulse of "Touch Me I'm Going to Scream, Pt. 2," rain started to fall.
NEWS
June 29, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julian "Winnie" Winston, 64, an industrial-design teacher at the University of the Arts, folk musician, author, and leading homeopath, died June 12 of prostate cancer at home in Wellington, New Zealand. "Winnie Winston . . . was an important figure in the folk-music scene of the 1960s and 1970s. He played banjo and pedal steel guitar. . . . He recorded with Steve Goodman, David Bromberg, Rosalie Sorrels and David Grisman, and made records under his own name," radio host Terry Gross said Thursday on her show, Fresh Air. Raised in Yonkers, N.Y., Mr. Winston was the son of art teachers.
NEWS
April 18, 2004 | By Gloria A. Hoffner INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If not for the Vietnam War, Ron Wayne Atwood might never have become a country singer. Atwood, born and raised in Delaware County, was drafted into the Army in 1966, and was stationed in North Carolina when he fell for country music. He left the service in 1968 with the guitar he had purchased as a soldier to help him launch a musical career. "I like the stories, the honesty of country music," Atwood said. "So many people put a stereotype on country music. They think it's only songs about 'He lost his wife, lost his dog, and the car broke down.
NEWS
September 15, 2003 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Country has come to town!" Toby Keith proclaimed to a jam-packed Tweeter Center crowd Saturday night. Ironically, this came after the set began with an extended (and pretty amusing) video sequence, flash pots and sparklers flared, and the singer emerged through billowing clouds of dry ice onto a futuristic-looking set and delivered a thundering rock number backed by his 10-man band and three female singers. In other words, this "country" show had all the trappings of a well-oiled pop extravaganza.
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