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Steeple

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NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the relentlessly residential rows of earthbound, two-story brick, they soar. To the south, the 176-foot, red-brick Sears clock tower marks the hours for birds and groundlings alike. Up near Bucks County, the eight-story Nabisco factory dominates the landscape of industrial parks and shopping centers. In between, though, it is steeples that define the skyline of the Northeast. Surveying the rooftops full of poor aluminum imitators, they poke through these fields of television antennas like grain elevators on a Kansas prairie.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | Inquirer photographs by Peter Tobia
St. Augustine's Church at Fourth and Pine is whole again. The city's fourth-oldest Catholic church lost its steeple in a 1992 storm. A newly constructed one assumed its place atop the church yesterday.
NEWS
January 26, 1995 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
There's a "little miracle" shaping up in Old City. That's what the Rev. Walter J. Quinn calls it, a little miracle. He also calls it "divine providence. " Whatever you call it, its way has been readied, its path prepared. Old St. Augustine's Catholic Church is getting its steeple back. Just in time for its bicentennial, too. The historic shrine at 4th and Vine streets has been without its landmark steeple since part if it blew down during a nor'easter in December 1992, a powerful winter storm that packed 80 mph winds, dropped record rains, and wreaked havoc on the city.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
To the rousing cheers of about 140 St. John Bosco parishioners, the Warminster Zoning Hearing Board voted to allow construction of a 70-foot church steeple on the congregation's proposed, and first, church. Construction on the classic, colonial-design Roman Catholic church on East County Line Road is expected to begin next spring, according to parish attorney Randolph A. Scott. Zoning board members Lorraine Butch and Charles Steimbach voted to grant a variance allowing the structured aluminum steeple atop the 35-foot proposed church building, which will seat 1,000.
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Diane Mastrull, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
As fire ravaged the First Presbyterian Church of Clayton, the church's 94- foot steeple stood in defiance of the wind-driven bright orange flames. The bell hanging in the steeple tower, a $300 gift from the women of the congregation when the church was built in 1869, was saved by water from a standpipe next to it. The rest of the two-story, Victorian-style church on Delsea Drive, including the 14 stained-glass windows, were consumed by the blaze, later determined to be the work of an arsonist.
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | By Kurt Pfitzer, Special to The Inquirer
Can a church be a church without a steeple? The Warminster Township Zoning Hearing Board is pondering the question, and St. John Bosco Roman Catholic Church is waiting for an answer. The parish wants to build a brick church at the southern end of its property at 235 E. County Line Rd. The 18,000-square-foot building would seat 1,000 people and cost an estimated $2 million. Its steeple would stretch 70 feet from the church's 34-foot-high roof to a height of 104 feet. The zoning board decided Tuesday night to postpone answering the steeple question until Nov. 29. Board Chairman Stanley Allen said he wanted board member Charles Steinbach, who was absent, to be able to review the plan.
NEWS
August 5, 2004 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Larry Falcon was sitting in his living room at 43d and Ludlow Streets at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday when he heard a rumble outside. The house shook. He opened the door. "I saw a cloud of dust billowing toward me, like it was 9/11," Falcon said yesterday. He is the pastor of the Covenant Community Church around the corner on the 4200 block of Chestnut Street. He didn't know that the 117-year-old steeple of Christ Memorial Church - on the northwest corner of 43d and Chestnut Streets - had collapsed, creating a hill of stone slabs and rubble 20 feet high.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Laura Cofsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk on Saturday, the Centennial Bell that hangs in the Independence Hall tower chimed for the first time in 18 months, filling the air with a clear, crisp sound that will mark every hour of every day. About 100 bystanders gathered to watch the unveiling of the Philadelphia landmark. "Here we are in the figurative shadow of our founders," Cynthia MacLeod, superintendent of Independence National Historical Park, said as she welcomed the crowd. She described the history of Independence Hall, from the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the ratification of the Constitution.
NEWS
September 15, 1995 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
St. Augustine's Church can't be kept down. It was destroyed once in a riot, ravaged by age, and forced to endure the rumble of traffic from the nearby Ben Franklin Bridge. Then in 1991, the city's fourth-oldest Catholic Church lost its steeple in what could be called an act of God. Yesterday, final work began to restore the church's ornate spire and resurrect its landmark status. Using two cranes, work crews hoisted into place two of three massive sections for a new 75-foot steeple.
NEWS
December 12, 1992 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writers Bob Warner and Scott Flander contributed to this report
The 150-year-old steeple at St. Augustine Church at 4th Street below Vine resembled a giant black umbrella turned inside out by the gusting winds. The middle section of the steeple was ripped away. The blackened wood foundation and the gold cross were all that remained. When workers on the nearby Ben Franklin Bridge saw the damaged structure during rush hour yesterday morning, they knew they had little choice but to shut down the span for the day. The bridge was initially closed at 7:30 a.m. after a huge billboard blew off a nearby building and onto the westbound PATCO tracks that carry commuter trains from New Jersey into Philadelphia.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hours before Burlington City's historic fire hall and emergency squad headquarters were sold, a group of first responders gathered one last time in the belly of the old brick building with the weathered steeple and wide doors that once accommodated horse-drawn fire wagons. "It's kind of funny. . . . It's like moving out of a house where you had a lot of memories and where you met most of your friends," said David Ekelburg, who first unpacked his coat and boots at the Endeavor Fire Company and Emergency Squad hall 40 years ago when he was a volunteer.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warren M. Tanksley Sr., 98, a building contractor, died Sunday, Nov. 4, at the York Nursing Home in Philadelphia. He had lived in Camden for many years. Mr. Tanksley was known for his mastery and meticulous attention to the details of building construction, learned from correspondence courses. "He was one of the few black men of his era to master these skills. It would be hard to find an aspect of the building trades that was foreign to him," said his daughter, Sallie. In the mid-1980s, the architects and engineers planning to build St. John Baptist Church in Camden doubted that they could bring in the project they envisioned - with a baptismal font and steeple - without going $500,000 over budget.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
THE ELDERS OF St. John Baptist Church in Camden were horrified in the mid-'80s, when their architects and engineers told them how much it would cost to build a new church. The church leaders were informed that to build the kind of church they wanted - with the steeple and baptismal pool they had envisioned - would cost $500,000 more than budgeted. What to do? Someone remembered Warren Tanksley. He was known as a master builder with an impeccable reputation for superior work and, just as important, economy.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Laura Cofsky, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk on Saturday, the Centennial Bell that hangs in the Independence Hall tower chimed for the first time in 18 months, filling the air with a clear, crisp sound that will mark every hour of every day. About 100 bystanders gathered to watch the unveiling of the Philadelphia landmark. "Here we are in the figurative shadow of our founders," Cynthia MacLeod, superintendent of Independence National Historical Park, said as she welcomed the crowd. She described the history of Independence Hall, from the signing of the Declaration of Independence to the ratification of the Constitution.
NEWS
December 28, 2009 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the weekend's weather went from frightful to delightful yesterday, the new Greater Mount Pisgah Church of Haddonfield came to life in brilliant sunshine. The 126-seat sanctuary at Ellis and Potter Streets was supposed to be inaugurated a week ago, ahead of Christmas, but near-record snowfall forced a postponement that allowed time for a few finishing touches. "We believe God gave us the blizzard because we were out of time," said the Rev. Mark-Anthony Rassmann Sr. "He gave us the sunshine because we are in perfect time now. " Resurrected from the ashes of a 2006 fire ignited by a roofer's torch, the century-and-a-quarter-old house of worship formerly known as Mount Pisgah A.M.E.
NEWS
December 6, 2007 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The sharp spire of historic St. Peter's Episcopal Church pokes a needle hole in the sky above the patrician townhouses of Society Hill. For more than 160 years, the tower has withstood blizzards, hurricanes, summer scorchings, the timber-rattling vibes from bells ringing in its chest, and the corrosive gifts left by winged guests - pigeons, that is, not angels. But like the bells, the years took their toll. By the 1990s, says Gail Hauptfuhrer, the church was in "some disrepair.
NEWS
June 20, 2006 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A historic Haddonfield church was heavily damaged yesterday by a three-alarm fire that broke out in the roof around the steeple, church and fire officials said. The blaze at Mount Pisgah A.M.E. Church, in the 200 block of Ellis Street, burned for about an hour after the first alarm sounded at 11:05 a.m. No one was injured. Fifty firefighters using 15 pieces of equipment brought the fire under control as a small group of church members watched near the small building. "That's the way life goes," said Charles Butler, 81, head trustee of the 50-member church, who lives next door.
NEWS
April 22, 2006 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And a powerful shower shall come to pass this afternoon in Old City. At 1:30, to be precise. That's when Christ Church plans to test a new fire-prevention system, sending torrents of water cascading down the outside of its storied old steeple - which survived a bad scare two years ago - and onto people, streets and gardens below. In typical fashion, the church - at Second and Market Streets - is turning it into a community event. "Bring your own umbrella," read the invitation sent to parishioners, preservationists, neighbors and other supporters of the church, where George Washington worshiped and Benjamin Franklin raised money to fund construction of the 253-year-old steeple.
NEWS
August 4, 2005 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Of the Aug. 3, 2004, collapse of the 117-year-old steeple of the landmark Christ Memorial Church in West Philadelphia, this much is known: The 171-foot-high steeple was hit by lightning and five hours later imploded in a pile of stone rubble. Now, a Philadelphia court is being asked to decide if the collapse was an act of nature or the result of years of "wear and tear" and neglect - and whether Christ Memorial's insurer is justified in denying the $8 million claim. "It was an act of nature, and it has devastated this congregation," said the Rev. Michael Fitzpatrick, Christ Memorial's acting pastor.
NEWS
August 9, 2004 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The hymn was about the importance of faith in God over form, of belief over buildings, and it could not have been more perfect. "Built on the Rock the church doth stand, Even when steeples are falling; Crumbled have spires in every land, Bells still are chiming and calling . . . " Less than a week ago, the 170-foot steeple of Christ Memorial Church in West Philadelphia collapsed into a pile of rubble, leaving the church badly damaged and...
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