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Stephen King

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NEWS
April 22, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Pet Sematary - whose masterminds are in no danger of winning a spelling bee, let alone an Oscar nomination - Stephen King makes a cameo appearance as a minister at a graveside service. He should have heeded the proverbial advice and let sleeping dogs lie. In the uneven range of King novels that have been brought to the screen - from Brian De Palma's flashy version of Carrie (1976) and Stanley Kubrick's quixotic view of The Shining (1980) to such dreary outings as Cujo (1983)
NEWS
September 25, 2003 | By Harold Bloom
The decision to give the National Book Foundation's annual award for "distinguished contribution" to Stephen King is extraordinary, another low in the shocking process of dumbing down our cultural life. I've described King in the past as a writer of penny dreadfuls, but perhaps even that is too kind. He shares nothing with Edgar Allan Poe. What he is is an immensely inadequate writer, on a sentence-by-sentence, paragraph-by-paragraph, book-by-book basis. The publishing industry has stooped terribly low to bestow on King a lifetime award that has previously gone to the novelists Saul Bellow and Philip Roth and to playwright Arthur Miller.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Take more blood than would fill a freight car, add a few hundred pounds of mucus and enough gross-out thrills for a barf convention, and you'd anticipate the ultimate horror novel in Stinger by Robert R. McCammon (Pocket Books, $4.95). Wince City, right? However, it's so filled with disgusting stuff that it also might turn into the ultimate hoot. It's a tale of extraterrestrial challenge in a depressed Texas town, wherein a tough Anglo grows sweet on a pretty Chicana, while a hard-bitten matriarch finds sterling qualities in a craven lawman.
SPORTS
December 16, 2003 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The personas of Shawnee midfielder Stephen King on the soccer field and off are at odds. But he has refused to change drastically for the sake of fulfilling an athletic stereotype. What King has shown during his brilliant career is that leaders come in different packages. On the soccer field, he doesn't demand the ball so much as take it in the flow of action. He isn't one to rile teammates with pregame oratory, but once the play begins, he comes out of his shell. That is when King exhibits the all-around skills that have enabled him to be named The Inquirer's South Jersey player of the year for a second straight season.
NEWS
June 24, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maybe the small screen just can't hold the colossal imagination of Stephen King. Some memorable films - The Shining , The Shawshank Redemption , Stand By Me - have been adapted from the work of the freakishly prolific author. But he hasn't generally translated as well to television, as evidenced by dreary miniseries like The Tommyknockers , The Langoliers, and Bag of Bones . Legendary filmmaker Steven Spielberg has a similarly disappointing track record in the domestic medium ( Taken , Terra Nova , Smash )
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1992 | By Richard Fuller, FOR THE INQUIRER
DOLORES CLAIBORNE Fiction. By Stephen King Viking. $23.50 The inside cover of the advance reviewer's copy of Dolores Claiborne confidently announces: "Stephen King's next bestseller. " Which is kind of like saying to the reviewer: "You don't like this book? Who cares?" Right. It doesn't mean anything that I had mixed feelings about King's previous bestseller, Gerald's Game, which was more literary stunt than satisfying read: Wife is handcuffed to bed by S&M husband, who just happens to lie dead beside the bed. Three hundred pages about being handcuffed to a bed?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1993 | By Faith Quintavell, FOR THE INQUIRER
The stars' musical abilities ranged from bad to awful. Tacky rock cliches - from decorative backup singers to trousers-dropping - were employed with abandon. Mayor Rendell praised the concert beforehand for raising money for literacy charities, then quickly added, "But I'm not staying for the show. " The Rock Bottom Remainders are a group of rock-star wannabes who just happen to be well-known writers - lead guitarist/humorist Dave Barry (who fronted the local band Federal Duck while a student at Haverford College)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1988 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
Who else could get away with a title like Misery (Signet, $4.95) and turn it into an instant best seller? Stephen King, of course, the man who writes more positive blurbs for fellow horrorists than anyone else on our troubled planet. King is not only mega-popular, he is getting better - his prose tighter and more energetic - than ever. Be warned, however, that this is a relentless tale of torture. A popular novelist (gee, guess who?) has a car accident and is hidden away and nursed by a psychopath.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2009 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
E! ONLINE got an early peek at Stephen King's interview with USA Weekend and the horror master is obviously at the stage of his career and life when he just doesn't give a s---. It's so refreshing to hear one best-seller crap on another. Asked about the huge success of the "Harry Potter" and "Twilight" series, King analyzed the talents of the two creators. "The real difference is that Jo Rowling is a terrific writer and Stephenie Meyer can't write worth a darn," King said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2016
For the week ended April 24, compiled by Nielsen BookScan ©2016 The Nielsen Co. Fiction 1. The Last Mile David Baldacci. Grand Central. $29 2. The Obsession Nora Roberts. Berkley. $28 3. The Nest Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney. Ecco. $27 4. As Time Goes By Mary Higgins Clark. Simon & Schuster. $27 5. Fool Me Once Harlan Coben. Dutton. $28 6. Eligible Curtis Sittenfeld. Random House. $28 7. Most Wanted Lisa Scottoline. St. Martin's. $28 8. War Hawk Rollins/Blackwood.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By David Patrick Stearns, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
NEW YORK - The inevitable moment of confrontation was upon them. How could any operatic adaptation of The Shining eradicate memories of those iconic Stanley Kubrick film moments when Jack Nicholson is breaking down the door to kill his terrified wife and psychic son? The question was posed somewhat pointedly on Tuesday at the National Opera America Center, when the Minnesota Opera presented a media preview of one of the most curiously awaited operas in years - The Shining - with premiere performances in Minneapolis on May 7 to 15. The answer was simple: The opera is based not on the 1980 film, but on Stephen King's 1977 novel.
NEWS
January 31, 2016
The word is out: Reading is far from dead. Fully 571 million books were sold in 2015 - sold, do you hear? - 17 million more than in 2014, according to Nielsen BookScan. More, do you hear? And the paper book, so long taken for dead, rose up and declared, "I remain": Electronic books are a big part of the market, at 25 percent, but the growth of their market share has leveled off. And, anyway, they're welcome. Reading is reading. And since we're all reading, here are some of the best titles soon to spring upon us in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry.
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