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Stereotypes

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NEWS
March 7, 2001
A headline (March 2) says: "St. Paddy's Day next on the revelry calendar. " I am celebrating the patron saint of Ireland - St. Patrick. No "St. Paddy" or "St. Patty" has ever been canonized in Rome. The article calls St. Patrick's Day"Philadelphia's next big drunken holiday. " Painting all celebrators as drunks relies on sad stereotypes. Unfortunately, there are Irish-Americans who reinforce these stereotypes. Hibernians do our best to dispel these images and be the finest examples of Irish America on March 11 and 17 - and throughout the year.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | BY RONALD W. COLEMAN
One of the unfortunate aspects of the Simpson murder case, besides the enormous human tragedy, is that for many of us, it will reinforce our prejudices. The trial will be in the news for years. The intellectually, statistically and emotionally dishonest and politically correct will deny stereotypes ever crossed their psyches, but individuals quick to stereotype will have a lot to point at: The alleged criminal is an "African-American male. " He was brought up in a housing project in a single-parent family.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | By Sabrina Walters, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Sarah Noe visited Camden High School at the beginning of the school year, she was nervous. Maybe even scared, said the 16-year-old junior from Audubon High School. "Some people told me to be careful - wear your bulletproof vest," Noe said. "I was expecting the kids to have a chip on their shoulder, because everyone said they have a chip there. " But what Noe and 29 classmates from predominantly white Audubon High found in their visits to Camden's Woodrow Wilson High, which is mostly black, were young people not much different from themselves.
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
"Hello Again. " A comedy starring Shelley Long, Judith Ivey, Corbin Bernsen and Gabriel Byrne. Written by Susan Isaacs. Produced and Directed by Frank Perry. Released by Touchstone Pictures. Running time: 96 minutes. At area theaters. Lucy Chadman (Shelley Long), a plastic surgeon's wife, chokes on a piece of food and dies. One year later, her sister, Zelda (Judith Ivey), a kooky mystic, brings her back to life with a magical incantation. Lucy faces a new life in more ways than one. Her husband has married her best friend, her son has gotten married, and the old house in the suburbs where she used to live has been sold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | BY ALEXANDRA OLIVIER, vellav@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
THEIR FACES ARE distorted, coiled into extreme expressions, their eyes slanted shut - these are some of the stereotypical drawings found in American comic books featuring Asian characters. The Asian Arts Initiative is taking a closer look at depictions of Asians and Asian-Americans in the exhibit, "Marvels and Monsters: Unmasking Asians in U.S. Comics, 1942-1986," brought to Philadelphia by New York University's Fales Library and Special Collections. The exhibit draws from the extensive collection of William F. Wu, a science-fiction author and cultural studies scholar.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
No group of new Americans have gained more sympathy from me than Asians from China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. Even though most of the stereotypes that surround them are "positive," they are having such a negative effect on young Asians that many live lives of quiet desperation. Many of the stereotypes - "Asians are smart," "Asians are industrious," "Asians are passive" - plague America's newest minority to the point that some become suicidal. Indeed, pressure by their families to succeed, by their peers to excel and by those outside the Asian American community to be "model minorities" have pushed the teenage suicide rate up dramatically.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
CBS figures it's pretty clever with its new sitcom, Some of My Best Friends. Let's see: Some of My Best Friends . . . Are morons. Are insulting bigots. Are creatively bankrupt dollar-chasers. If the network had made a deal with NBC, and the show were some of my best Friends, CBS would have something. But, as it is, Some of My Best Friends, which premieres tonight at 8, just spends most of its time making "jokes" at the expense of the standard, all-purpose TV whipping-boy: The Italian American.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
That old staple, the culture-clash romantic comedy, is back once more in "David & Layla. " And like everything from the creaky "Abie's Irish Rose" (first filmed in 1928) to "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," which took a few years for people to realize how creaky it actually was, this one's a depressing melange of stereotypes and cliches. Which is too bad, since the star-crossed lovers here are a Jewish guy and a Muslim gal. You'd think the enmity the two groups have for each other might lend Jay Jonroy's low-budget production a little more tension and real-world drama than these things usually have.
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NEWS
September 3, 2014
AS A Daily News subscriber, I am glad that Chris Brennan's article "For the Record, publisher is sorry" addressed the Philadelphia Public Record 's changing response to widespread criticism of its use of anti-Asian slurs. I am disappointed that Mr. Brennan did not take the opportunity to educate my fellow readers about the historical roots of such slurs. Since the 1980s, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has documented the stereotype of the Asian perpetual foreigner as being the cause of numerous hate crimes perpetrated against Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs)
SPORTS
June 27, 2014
THE PERCEPTION some racing fans have of drivers' wives is they live in McMansions, buy expensive clothes, drive luxury cars and travel to races in private planes. Krissie Newman insists this perception isn't entirely true. "Some [wives] are glamorous, but most of us are ordinary people," she said during a recent interview. Krissie and her husband, Ryan Newman, have two young daughters. Ryan drives the No. 31 Chevrolet for Richard Childress Racing. Krissie grew up in North Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It used to be that everybody wanted to be a director; now it turns out that everybody actually wants to be a playwright. This week, Barrymore-winning actor James Ijames, 33, will see the opening of his new play, The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington , in a production by Flashpoint Theatre Company at the Off Broad Street Theatre. And while his play is running here, he'll be down in Baltimore performing in a play written by another actor, West Philly's Colman Domingo, whose Wild With Happy is at Center Stage.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Often highly skilled and high-achieving, Asian immigrants are frequently portrayed as America's "model minorities" - cliched as hardworking greengrocers or math-whiz entrepreneurs. But a new report on Asian Americans in Philadelphia released Wednesday challenges the stereotypes with a complex portrait of a community comprising more than two dozen countries of origin, and mixed levels of comfort and attainment. Disaggregating Asians by their ethnicities, the report finds pockets of poverty, gaps in education, trouble securing affordable housing, and other critical needs.
NEWS
November 17, 2013 | By Merilyn Jackson, For The Inquirer
Dancer/choreographer Amanda Miller keeps refining her choreographic chops, researching new work with a small group of dancers and theater artists that includes her partner, videographer Tobin Rothlein, and, in this case, Kristin Kest, a sci-fi illustrator turned dramaturg. The company, approaching its 10th year and now called simply Miller Rothlein, opened Forbidden Creature Virgin Whore Thursday evening at the White Space at Crane Arts Old School, where they have been in residence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
A few years back, Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Roberts' I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change! and its many spores - all containing sketches and songs organized around a central theme (relationships, menopause, religion) - proliferated like an invasive species. Thankfully, the show that launched them all, Off-Broadway's second-longest running, closed in 2008 after 12 years. Here's hoping Montgomery Theater's production represents its final throes. It's not that there's anything glaringly wrong with this production.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dancers swirled to an ever-faster drumbeat. "Condom Man" tumbled into a skit. "Slutty Girl" sat on a guy's lap, while "Snob" turned up her nose. The humor on display Thursday morning at Rowan University, at a "summit" of hundreds of high school students from across Gloucester County had a serious purpose. It was intended to empower them to deal with issues that can vex people their age: bullying, homophobia, HIV, peer pressure. "I want them to realize they're not the only ones dealing with it," said Renee Richardson, 50, an art teacher at West Deptford High School who brought 28 of her students.
SPORTS
February 2, 2013 | By Nick Carroll, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Wrestlers might not always have the best reputation. "The outside perception of wrestlers is more the knuckle-dragger, not the brightest guy," Shawnee coach Thomas Mann said. "Usually, they're thinking that we're not playing with a full deck, either. " That reputation aside, Shawnee's Austin Wetterau is one of the school's most accomplished students. Wetterau, a senior 170-pounder, is 15th in his class with a 3.91 grade point average and is taking four honors-level classes, including two Advanced Placement courses.
NEWS
June 8, 2012 | Letter to the Inquirer Editor
Stereotypes seen in cartoon A cartoon drawn by Rob Tornoe in Sunday's Sports section depicted Phillies pitcher Cliff Lee doing housework while a black/brown player with the word "Offense" written on his T-shirt slept on a couch. The Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists submits that this cartoon is racially insensitive. African American and Latino men are often stereotyped as being lazy and not wanting to work hard. The cartoon may suggest to readers that male athletes of color are lazy.
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