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Stereotypes

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NEWS
March 7, 2001
A headline (March 2) says: "St. Paddy's Day next on the revelry calendar. " I am celebrating the patron saint of Ireland - St. Patrick. No "St. Paddy" or "St. Patty" has ever been canonized in Rome. The article calls St. Patrick's Day"Philadelphia's next big drunken holiday. " Painting all celebrators as drunks relies on sad stereotypes. Unfortunately, there are Irish-Americans who reinforce these stereotypes. Hibernians do our best to dispel these images and be the finest examples of Irish America on March 11 and 17 - and throughout the year.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | BY RONALD W. COLEMAN
One of the unfortunate aspects of the Simpson murder case, besides the enormous human tragedy, is that for many of us, it will reinforce our prejudices. The trial will be in the news for years. The intellectually, statistically and emotionally dishonest and politically correct will deny stereotypes ever crossed their psyches, but individuals quick to stereotype will have a lot to point at: The alleged criminal is an "African-American male. " He was brought up in a housing project in a single-parent family.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | By Sabrina Walters, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When Sarah Noe visited Camden High School at the beginning of the school year, she was nervous. Maybe even scared, said the 16-year-old junior from Audubon High School. "Some people told me to be careful - wear your bulletproof vest," Noe said. "I was expecting the kids to have a chip on their shoulder, because everyone said they have a chip there. " But what Noe and 29 classmates from predominantly white Audubon High found in their visits to Camden's Woodrow Wilson High, which is mostly black, were young people not much different from themselves.
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | By ROSE DeWOLF, Daily News Staff Writer
"Hello Again. " A comedy starring Shelley Long, Judith Ivey, Corbin Bernsen and Gabriel Byrne. Written by Susan Isaacs. Produced and Directed by Frank Perry. Released by Touchstone Pictures. Running time: 96 minutes. At area theaters. Lucy Chadman (Shelley Long), a plastic surgeon's wife, chokes on a piece of food and dies. One year later, her sister, Zelda (Judith Ivey), a kooky mystic, brings her back to life with a magical incantation. Lucy faces a new life in more ways than one. Her husband has married her best friend, her son has gotten married, and the old house in the suburbs where she used to live has been sold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2012 | BY ALEXANDRA OLIVIER, vellav@phillynews.com 215-854-5444
THEIR FACES ARE distorted, coiled into extreme expressions, their eyes slanted shut - these are some of the stereotypical drawings found in American comic books featuring Asian characters. The Asian Arts Initiative is taking a closer look at depictions of Asians and Asian-Americans in the exhibit, "Marvels and Monsters: Unmasking Asians in U.S. Comics, 1942-1986," brought to Philadelphia by New York University's Fales Library and Special Collections. The exhibit draws from the extensive collection of William F. Wu, a science-fiction author and cultural studies scholar.
NEWS
August 14, 1991 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
No group of new Americans have gained more sympathy from me than Asians from China, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam. Even though most of the stereotypes that surround them are "positive," they are having such a negative effect on young Asians that many live lives of quiet desperation. Many of the stereotypes - "Asians are smart," "Asians are industrious," "Asians are passive" - plague America's newest minority to the point that some become suicidal. Indeed, pressure by their families to succeed, by their peers to excel and by those outside the Asian American community to be "model minorities" have pushed the teenage suicide rate up dramatically.
NEWS
February 28, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
CBS figures it's pretty clever with its new sitcom, Some of My Best Friends. Let's see: Some of My Best Friends . . . Are morons. Are insulting bigots. Are creatively bankrupt dollar-chasers. If the network had made a deal with NBC, and the show were some of my best Friends, CBS would have something. But, as it is, Some of My Best Friends, which premieres tonight at 8, just spends most of its time making "jokes" at the expense of the standard, all-purpose TV whipping-boy: The Italian American.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2007 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
That old staple, the culture-clash romantic comedy, is back once more in "David & Layla. " And like everything from the creaky "Abie's Irish Rose" (first filmed in 1928) to "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," which took a few years for people to realize how creaky it actually was, this one's a depressing melange of stereotypes and cliches. Which is too bad, since the star-crossed lovers here are a Jewish guy and a Muslim gal. You'd think the enmity the two groups have for each other might lend Jay Jonroy's low-budget production a little more tension and real-world drama than these things usually have.
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NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
MERCERSBURG, Pa. - A Haitian immigrant and the daughter of an Asbury Park, N.J., taxi driver, Withney Barthelemy was not exactly the prototypical candidate for an elite prep school. But at the behest of a teacher, she applied to a 300-acre boarding school deep in the hills of south-central Pennsylvania - Mercersburg Academy - and it offered her a full scholarship. "It provided me with so many opportunities I wouldn't have had any other way," said Barthelemy, who moved to the United States when she was 4. "I felt like I was wanted despite the economic background I had. " She had what might be viewed as a dream high school career.
NEWS
June 8, 2016
One of the most deplorable aspects of the debate over Mayor Kenney's proposal to tax sugary beverages to fund more prekindergarten education, open community schools, and upgrade recreation centers is the tendency of both sides to stereotype the dietary habits of poor people to make their case. Opponents of the tax, most notably the beverage industry, insist it would affect low-income families inequitably because they buy more sugary drinks. Some proponents suggest the same families would benefit most because a tax would reduce their disproportionate consumption of sweet drinks, which exacerbate the obesity problem in poor, minority communities.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TELEVISION CRITIC
Mike (Patrick Warburton, Seinfeld ) and Martina Moore (Carrie Preston, The Good Wife ) want to be left alone in their empty nest, and I want that for them, too. Sadly, their new NBC series, Crowded , isn't going to make that possible. Created by Suzanne Martin ( Hot in Cleveland ), whose own daughters returned home to live after college, Crowded quickly refills the Moores' vacated bedrooms when daughters Stella (Mia Serafino) and Shea (Miranda Cosgrove, iCarly )
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2016 | By Matthew Westphal, For The Inquirer
Well, it's a good thing the Social Justice Warrior brigade didn't find out about Tempesta di Mare's concerts last weekend. The program, titled "The Nations" and heard Saturday evening at the American Philosophical Society, dealt in some dastardly ethnic stereotypes. Well, so the SJWs might say. In fact, it was easy to shake off any moral concerns because those caricatures are now 300 years old and hardly recognizable to us in 2016, so the excellent program notes and witty spoken introduction by Tempesta directors Gwyn Roberts and Richard Stone were key to letting us in on the jokes.
NEWS
February 5, 2016
ON TUESDAY, students and staff at Kensington Urban Teaching Academy were placed on complete lockdown by the Philadelphia Police Department for over 90 minutes because of the reckless and irresponsible behavior of a school police officer. We at Youth United for Change, as well as other community groups concerned about the state of public education in the city, have consistently and publicly expressed our frustration at the school district's increasing reliance on police presence to "improve climate" in our schools (through a model of "neighborhood pacification")
NEWS
January 5, 2016 | By Carter Dougherty
In a documentary about the making of Star Wars , the venerable Walter Cronkite lauded the first movie for lifting the United States out of our "depression of the '70s," the mood induced by the trauma of Vietnam and the skullduggery of Watergate. We were ready to believe in heroes again, and to affirm an intergalactic morality tale wrapped in dazzling special effects. Since we knew not our preternatural need for Star Wars , it hit us with the force of The Force. We can't reasonably expect J.J. Abrams to deliver the same kind of experience that George Lucas did back then, nailing the zeitgeist with a product we couldn't ask for because we didn't know we needed it. We have asked and asked; finally he's delivered an engaging flick.
NEWS
September 3, 2014
AS A Daily News subscriber, I am glad that Chris Brennan's article "For the Record, publisher is sorry" addressed the Philadelphia Public Record 's changing response to widespread criticism of its use of anti-Asian slurs. I am disappointed that Mr. Brennan did not take the opportunity to educate my fellow readers about the historical roots of such slurs. Since the 1980s, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has documented the stereotype of the Asian perpetual foreigner as being the cause of numerous hate crimes perpetrated against Asian Pacific Islanders (APIs)
SPORTS
June 27, 2014
THE PERCEPTION some racing fans have of drivers' wives is they live in McMansions, buy expensive clothes, drive luxury cars and travel to races in private planes. Krissie Newman insists this perception isn't entirely true. "Some [wives] are glamorous, but most of us are ordinary people," she said during a recent interview. Krissie and her husband, Ryan Newman, have two young daughters. Ryan drives the No. 31 Chevrolet for Richard Childress Racing. Krissie grew up in North Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It used to be that everybody wanted to be a director; now it turns out that everybody actually wants to be a playwright. This week, Barrymore-winning actor James Ijames, 33, will see the opening of his new play, The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington , in a production by Flashpoint Theatre Company at the Off Broad Street Theatre. And while his play is running here, he'll be down in Baltimore performing in a play written by another actor, West Philly's Colman Domingo, whose Wild With Happy is at Center Stage.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Often highly skilled and high-achieving, Asian immigrants are frequently portrayed as America's "model minorities" - cliched as hardworking greengrocers or math-whiz entrepreneurs. But a new report on Asian Americans in Philadelphia released Wednesday challenges the stereotypes with a complex portrait of a community comprising more than two dozen countries of origin, and mixed levels of comfort and attainment. Disaggregating Asians by their ethnicities, the report finds pockets of poverty, gaps in education, trouble securing affordable housing, and other critical needs.
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