CollectionsSterilization
IN THE NEWS

Sterilization

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 5, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is good news for the millions of people who want easy, reliable, permanent birth control, but dread the idea of surgical sterilization. Two devices have recently come on the market that make sterilization possible without surgery - for men and women. As with traditional tubal ligation and vasectomy, the new devices stop the passage of eggs or sperm, but do not require cutting, suturing or cauterizing the tubes that carry the sex cells. The Food and Drug Administration approved both devices late last year, and doctors are now beginning to offer them: Essure, made by Conceptus Inc. of San Carlos, Calif.
NEWS
March 23, 1993 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The state Superior Court has overturned a decision that would have resulted in the sterilization of a brain-damaged 24-year-old Philadelphia woman. In a 2-1 ruling, the court said "the proponents of sterilization have not proven by clear and convincing evidence that other methods of contraception, such as hormonal treatments, education, training supervision, are unworkable," said appeals court Judge Justin M. Johnson. The woman is referred to only as C.W. In 1990, after the woman's mother testified that her only desire was to protect her daughter, a Common Pleas judge ordered C.W. to undergo a tubal ligation.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A last-ditch appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court was filed yesterday by the lawyer representing Cindy W., the severely retarded Northeast Philadelphia woman whose mother wants to have her surgically sterilized. Lorrie McKinley, the court-appointed lawyer who has fought against the sterilization for seven years, argued in her petition that the surgery would violate Cindy's right to "bodily integrity and reproductive autonomy. " That right, she said, is protected by the 14th Amendment, which prohibits the government from barring any person of "life, liberty or property without due process.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dolores Wasiek had to sit down. "You're kidding," she said. "What does this mean? Does this mean it's over?" Yesterday, U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter turned down a request for an emergency order to prevent Wasiek from scheduling sterilization surgery for her severely retarded 26-year-old daughter, Cindy. Wasiek, of Philadelphia's Port Richmond section, has been battling in court for seven years for legal permission to have her daughter's tubes tied. "All the legal stuff confuses me," Wasiek said.
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
By a 6-3 vote, the state Superior Court has cleared the way for the sterilization of a 25-year-old brain-damaged Philadelphia woman. The woman, known as C.W., lives in a community setting most of the time and "appears to crave physical contact with others. " But if she became pregnant, she would be subject to "life-threatening trauma," the court said. In 1990, Common Pleas Judge Judith J. Jamison ordered C.W. to undergo sterilization. Last year, two of three Superior Court judges ruled against the procedure, but the lawyer for the woman's mother persuaded the entire appeals court to hear the case.
NEWS
February 21, 1995 | BY CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
"Recently, I have begun to use hysterectomy in patients with severe mental retardation," reported Surgeon General-designate Henry Foster in 1974. There was nothing wrong with the uteruses of these women. But because there was a lot wrong with their brains, Foster performed major surgery on them for the sole purpose of preventing them from having children or menstrual periods. Foster's intentions were no doubt good. The women might be incapable of caring for children. And eliminating their periods would make keeping up their hygiene easier.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Dolores Wasiek saw the young man standing in the doorway to her daughter's room, she shouted angrily up the stairs. "What are you doing there!" He moved away furtively. One of the supervisors at the group home ran to the foyer. "Why is he standing at her door?" Wasiek demanded. Her 18-year-old daughter, Cindy, had lived in the group home for six years. She is a winsome girl, long-limbed and awkward as a calf, woefully nearsighted behind big glasses, who was left mute and severely brain-damaged as a baby by severe epileptic seizures.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lawyers for a severely retarded Northeast Philadelphia woman whose mother is seeking to have her surgically sterilized scrambled yesterday to seek an emergency stay from the U.S. Supreme Court, after Pennsylvania's highest court took the unusual step of denying the stay pending further appeal. U.S. Supreme Court Justice David Souter was weighing a request last night from lawyer Lorrie McKinley, who is legal guardian for Cindy W., a 26-year-old woman with the mental age of a 5-year-old.
NEWS
April 4, 1995 | By Dan Hardy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The head of an infectious-waste sterilization company here said yesterday that he planned to defy a shutdown order from the state Department of Environmental Resources and instead continue operations. The DER had told Thermal Pure Systems Inc. to close its doors yesterday because of a Commonwealth Court judge's decision to revoke the company's waste-handling permit until new state regulations for infectious-waste sterilization facilities were formulated. But in an interview yesterday, Thomas Kilmer, Thermal Pure's president, vowed to keep the plant open until he gets an answer from Commonwealth Court on his company's request for a rehearing of the case by the full court.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | By Mark Bowden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's highest court cleared the way yesterday for the surgical sterilization of Cindy W., a severely retarded 26-year-old Philadelphia woman at the center of a long-running court battle. The young woman's mother, Delores Wasiek, has fought for seven years to get court permission for the operation. "Oh, my God!" Wasiek exclaimed when she heard the news. "I can't believe this. What happens now?" The court's decision disappointed Lorrie McKinley, a lawyer appointed by the court to represent Cindy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to dogs and cats, Camden has long had some of the strictest ordinances in the state, including one requiring all owners to spay or neuter their pets. In fact, until recently, Camden was the only municipality in New Jersey with such a mandate. This month, after city officials became aware the ordinance was more restrictive than state law, City Council voted to amend it. Now, the city no longer tickets pet owners who don't fix their dogs as long as those dogs are licensed.
NEWS
January 21, 2013
THE Daily News Pet of the Week is Tilly Tangerine, a 1-to-2-year-old pit-bull mix at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Tilly Tangerine is energetic and sweet, and knows basic obedience. She would be fine with dogs her size or larger, but not with other small animals or children. To adopt Tilly Tangerine, contact PAWS, 100 N. 2nd St., at 215-238-9901 before visiting the shelter. When inquiring, please provide her tag identifier, 16759259. The shelter's $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccinations and microchipping.
NEWS
November 12, 2012
The Daily News Pet of the Week is Nala (right), a 1-year-old pitbull mix at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Nala is active and friendly. She is affectionate and likes belly rubs. To adopt Nala, contact PAWS, 100 N. 2nd St., at 215-238-9901. When inquiring, please provide her tag identifier, A17741535-Clinic. A $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccines and microchipping.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2012 | From Inquirer Wire Services
European Central Bank President Mario Draghi gets his chance Thursday to spell out how the bank intends to rescue the 17 countries that use the euro from financial disaster. Draghi's bond-buying proposal, outlined to Bloomberg News by officials briefed on the plan, involves unlimited purchases of government debt that will be "sterilized" to assuage concerns about the central bank "printing money. " Expectations have been high since late July, when the ECB head vowed to do "whatever it takes" to hold the eurozone together.
NEWS
September 4, 2012
THIS WEEK'S Daily News Pet of the Week is Miko (right), a 1-year-old Jack Russell terrier/Chihuahua mix being offered by the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Miko is an affectionate and playful puppy. He likes other dogs but likes humans better. To adopt Miko, contact PAWS, 2nd and Arch streets, Old City, at 215-238-9901. Please provide tag #A15537735-PAC when inquiring. A $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccines and microchipping.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Catholic bishops have vowed to fight the Obama administration's compromise on insurance coverage for contraception and sterilization, denouncing it as "coercive," "insulting," "unconstitutional," "belligerent," and "dangerous. " Yet there is evidence the sterilization services the bishops oppose have been provided by many Catholic hospitals across the country, including a few in the Philadelphia area. Some evidence comes from news reports about bishops cracking down.
NEWS
January 11, 2012 | By Martha Waggoner, Associated Press
RALEIGH, N.C. - As many as 2,000 people forcibly sterilized decades ago in North Carolina should get $50,000 each, a task force said Tuesday, marking the first time a state has moved to compensate victims of eugenics programs that weeded out the "feebleminded" and others deemed undesirable. The payout of up to $100 million still needs approval from the legislature, but passage of some sort of compensation is considered promising, since the Democratic governor immediately embraced the task force recommendation.
NEWS
July 11, 2011
The Daily News Pet of the Week is Diamond, a 2-to-4-year-old boxer/terrier mix at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Diamond is cuddly and loving. She would be a perfect fit with someone who is able to teach her some basic manners. To adopt Diamond, contact PAWS, 100 N. 2nd St., at 215-238-9901. When inquiring, please provide her tag identifier, A13464740-Clinic. A $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccines and microchipping.
NEWS
June 13, 2011
The Daily News Pet of the Week is Sprinkles (above), a 3-to-5-year-old American Staffordshire terrier mix at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Sprinkles always seems to be happy, likes to cuddle and has medium energy. She would do best as the only pet in the house. To adopt Sprinkles, contact PAWS, 100 N. 2nd St., at 215-238-9901. When inquiring, please provide her tag identifier, A11993396-Clinic. A $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccines and microchipping.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
The Daily News Pet of the Week is Beauty, a 3 1/2-year-old bullmastiff/Lab mix at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Beauty is friendly, likes exercise and knows some basic obedience. She would do best in a home with older children and no cats. To adopt Beauty, contact PAWS, 100 N. 2nd St., at 215-238-9901. When inquiring, please provide her tag identifier, A09075075-Clinic. A $75 fee includes sterilization, vaccines, and microchipping.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|