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Steroids

NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Keith Gidelson said he was a good detective and could have been a great one. But an on-the-job car crash in 2006 effectively ended his Philadelphia police career and led him to a dark side. Desperate to make money, Gidelson began selling steroids. He was sorry, Gidelson told a judge Monday. Sorry for his devastated family, for the agents and prosecutor who investigated him, even for the judge left to sentence him for what his lawyer called an "aberration" on a blemish-free record.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
By William C. Kashatus Baseball writers have until the end of this month to cast their ballot for the Hall of Fame's Class of 2013. Of the 24 retired players to appear on the ballot for the first time are sluggers Barry Bonds and Sammy Sosa and pitching ace Roger Clemens. While their statistical achievements are impressive, each man's career has been tainted by allegations of performance-enhancing substances. If those who cast the ballots for baseball immortality take seriously their responsibility as stewards of the game, Bonds, Sosa, and Clemens will be rejected.
SPORTS
December 24, 2012 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Staff Writer
The mother of all Hall of Fame ballots arrived in the mail earlier this month and I immediately set aside the manila envelope and continued to ponder how to handle the polarizing players who showed up on the ballot for the first time this year. You know the names. Barry Bonds. Roger Clemens. Sammy Sosa. Superstars who stained the game by using performance-enhancing steroids. After this year's ballot arrived, I started reading columns from some of my fellow members in the Baseball Writers' Association of America.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, WILLIAM BENDER & LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writers narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE MUSCLES that Garrett Reid packed on before he died of an overdose at Eagles training camp in August may have been a facade, it seems, like his sobriety. Authorities in Northampton County said Monday that the 19 vials of liquid found in Reid's dorm room at Lehigh University after his death Aug. 5 contained four types of anabolic steroids used mostly by bodybuilders. Reid, 29, was volunteering as a strength-and-conditioning coach with the team, coached by his father, during training camp over the summer.
SPORTS
December 19, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
This Eagles season began under the pall of Garrett Reid's death. It is going to end the same way. There was nothing surprising in Monday's revelation that Andy Reid's 29-year-old son had steroids at the time of his death. Garrett Reid had steroids when he was first arrested all the way back in 2007, and it made intuitive sense that the mystery vials in his Lehigh dorm room contained more of the same. It was obviously a terrible idea to have Garrett Reid around the team. It didn't prevent the worst possible outcome for him and for his family, and it raises uncomfortable and ugly questions about his access to the players.
SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The oldest son of Eagles coach Andy Reid had illegal anabolic steroids in his Lehigh University dormitory room when he died of a heroin overdose Aug. 5 during the team's training camp, Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli said Monday. Tests showed that 19 vials found in Garrett Reid's gym bag contained four types of anabolic steroids used for bodybuilding, Morganelli said. The steroids did not contribute to Reid's death, the district attorney said. Garrett Reid, 29, was an assistant on the Eagles' strength and conditioning staff.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012
Sleep drug linked to falls The sleep drug Ambien greatly increases hospital patients' risk of falling, a new study finds. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., looked at data on more than 16,000 hospitalized patients and found that the fall rate for those who took Ambien was more than four times higher than for those who did not take the drug - just over 3 percent, compared with 0.7 percent. "As a result of our study, we are now phasing out {Ambien} and moving toward sleep enhancement techniques that are not based on drugs and which we believe are safer and probably as effective," Timothy Morgenthaler, Mayo's chief patient safety officer, said in a release.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By John P. Martin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former Philadelphia police detective on Tuesday admitted running a ring that imported steroids and human growth hormone from overseas distributors and sold them to users around the city. Keith Gidelson, 36, got the drugs from connections in Europe and China, then resold them out of his Northeast Philadelphia home, in fitness clubs, and at other locations. Authorities said they weren't sure when his ring started, but estimated that Gidelson sold more than 10,000 injections and pills before getting caught in 2011.
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