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Steroids

SPORTS
December 18, 2012 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The oldest son of Eagles coach Andy Reid had illegal anabolic steroids in his Lehigh University dormitory room when he died of a heroin overdose Aug. 5 during the team's training camp, Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli said Monday. Tests showed that 19 vials found in Garrett Reid's gym bag contained four types of anabolic steroids used for bodybuilding, Morganelli said. The steroids did not contribute to Reid's death, the district attorney said. Garrett Reid, 29, was an assistant on the Eagles' strength and conditioning staff.
NEWS
December 17, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer|narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
Garrett Reid, the son of Eagles coach Andy Reid and a volunteer on the team's strength and conditioning staff, had 19 vials of steroids in his room at Lehigh University when he died from an overdose Aug. 5, authorities said Monday. Reid also had 64 needles and 47 syringes in a gym bag in his dorm room, said Northampton County District Attorney John Morganelli. The vials included several types of steroids, including testosterone and other strong chemicals used by bodybuilders, Morganelli said, adding that authorities have been unable to find the source of the steroids or the heroin that killed Reid.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012
Sleep drug linked to falls The sleep drug Ambien greatly increases hospital patients' risk of falling, a new study finds. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., looked at data on more than 16,000 hospitalized patients and found that the fall rate for those who took Ambien was more than four times higher than for those who did not take the drug - just over 3 percent, compared with 0.7 percent. "As a result of our study, we are now phasing out {Ambien} and moving toward sleep enhancement techniques that are not based on drugs and which we believe are safer and probably as effective," Timothy Morgenthaler, Mayo's chief patient safety officer, said in a release.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
AFORMER Philadelphia police detective admitted in federal district court Tuesday that he operated an anabolic-steroid and human-growth-hormone distribution ring from September 2009 to April 2011. Keith Gidelson, 36, of Bensalem, could face up to 37 months in a federal lockup when he is sentenced in January. Prosecutors said that Gidelson obtained monthly shipments from Europe and China, then sold the drugs to customers in his house and in fitness clubs, and to people he met in online weightlifting chat rooms through websites such as steroids.com and inject.com.
NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By John P. Martin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Philadelphia police detective on Tuesday admitted running a ring that imported steroids and human growth hormone from overseas distributors and sold them to users around the city. Keith Gidelson, 36, got the drugs from connections in Europe and China, then resold them out of his Northeast Philadelphia home, in fitness clubs, and at other locations. Authorities said they weren't sure when his ring started, but estimated that Gidelson sold more than 10,000 injections and pills before getting caught in 2011.
NEWS
October 6, 2012 | By Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Millions of people get steroid shots in their backs to relieve pain. Now they are probably wondering if it's safe. In 23 states, hundreds, possibly thousands, of back-pain patients are being warned to watch for symptoms of meningitis because of a custom-mixed steroid solution that may have been contaminated with a fungus. Five people have died and more than 40 others have fallen ill. Health officials on Friday identified 75 clinics across the country that received steroid shots for back pain now linked to the illnesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: With all the recent attention paid to athletes over illegal steroid drug use, I've been wondering what harm these drugs actually do. Can you explain? Answer: There are a number of performance-enhancing drugs with different effects and safety concerns. The most common performance-enhancing drugs are derivatives of testosterone, such as androstenediol, DHEA, hCG (the same hormone used to detect pregnancy), THG, oxandrolone and stanozolol. They are well-known to increase muscle bulk and strength.
NEWS
August 3, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chinese swimmer Ye Shiwen, 16, had barely dried off from a pair of record-breaking performances in the London Olympics before facing the drip, drip, drip of suspicion that she must be doping. The aspersions are no surprise, given the ever-growing ranks of elite athletes caught in doping scandals. The surprising thing, at least to modern sensibilities, is that for a very long time, the use of performance-enhancing drugs, even toxic ones, was perfectly acceptable. Thomas Hicks won the 1904 Olympic marathon during a stifling St. Louis heat wave by fortifying himself with brandy and strychnine, also known as rat poison.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Mitchell Hecht
Question: I used to get cold sores about two to three times a year. They start with tingling, itching, and burning, and then they scab over. With the last one I had, I took action: I squeezed out the fluid and applied Vicks VapoRub. I haven't had another one since. What do you think of that? Answer: I think that it's a bad idea to pop those tiny clusters of cold sore blisters. They're packed full of viral particles of the herpes variety. And that makes the fluid very, very infectious.
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