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Steve Jobs

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NEWS
October 6, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO who invented and masterfully marketed ever-sleeker gadgets that transformed everyday technology, from the personal computer to the iPod and iPhone, has died. He was 56. Apple announced his death without giving a specific cause. "Steve's brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. The world is immeasurably better because of Steve," the statement said.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AARON SORKIN'S hotly debated script for "Steve Jobs" avoids biopic formula, instead looking at the Apple co-founder in the context of three product launches. Sorkin talked with Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson about the movie. Q: "Steve Jobs" is about a particular individual, but it also fits a tradition of movies about American industrial titans, men with whom Jobs has things in common. A: In a way, this character has been around forever. William Randolph Hearst became "Citizen Kane.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question came up in conversation: How did Steve Jobs pronounce his last name? The legendary Apple co-founder and tech-design guru died Thursday, at age 56, possibly of complications from a bout with pancreatic cancer that began in 2004. On news reports, his surname has most often been said to rhyme with lobs . But some say the correct way is like the Biblical character, Job, and the name should rhyme with lobes . A couple of YouTube videos give a clear answer.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2011 | By Patrick May, MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS
SAN JOSE, Calif. - He was the visionary techie, the marketing genius, the choleric corporate leader who could never quite scrub the rebel out of his soul. But most of all, standing there in his black mock turtleneck at the intersection of passion and technology, Steve Jobs seemed to know intuitively what consumers needed in their lives, even before they themselves could put a finger on it. Decades after co-creating Apple Inc., one of the planet's most storied companies, then leaving it behind, then returning to reinvent it and pump it full of high-voltage ideas until it became the world's most-valuable tech company, Jobs leaves a cultural landscape forever altered by his gadgetry and gusto.
NEWS
August 25, 2011 | SAN JOSE MERCURY
SAN JOSE, Calif. - Steve Jobs has resigned as CEO at Apple, the company he co-founded at age 21 and turned into an international business icon, known for its tremendous profits and elegantly designed devices like the iPhone, iPad and Mac computers. The Cupertino, Calif., company announced yesterday that veteran executive Tim Cook has been named as Jobs' replacement. In a letter, Jobs said the time to leave had arrived. "I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple's CEO, I would be the first to let you know.
NEWS
November 27, 2011
By Walter Isaacson Simon & Schuster. 630 pp. $35 Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Steve Jobs was all about things: elegantly designed things, wondrously innovative things, meticulously made things. Heck, let's steal his own quote: Steve Jobs was all about "insanely great" things. And about people? Not so much. Yelling and humiliation were mainstays of his management style; kindness was rare, meanness was not. Yet, along with the rage went a charisma that mesmerized those who worked with him and for him, drawing them into his dreams, with amazing results.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Few of us make a ripple in the grand river of time. We may leave descendants, some possessions passed along to subsequent generations. Steve Jobs, who died Wednesday at age 56, was not that sort of person. What he did, who he was, changed our lives, altering the landscape of technology, communication, and entertainment. He was the bend in the river. He imagined our future through brilliant marketing, making progress tangible and tactile. "You can't connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.
NEWS
October 5, 2011 | By Bruce Newman, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Steve Jobs, who sparked a revolution in the technology industry then presided over it as Silicon Valley's radiant Sun King, died Wednesday. The incandescent center of a tech universe around which all the other planets revolved, Jobs had a genius for stylish design and a boyish sense of what was "cool. " He was 56 when he died, ahead of his time to the very end. According to a spokesman for Apple Inc. - the company Jobs co-founded when he was just 21 and turned into one of the world's great industrial-design houses - he suffered from a recurrence of the pancreatic cancer for which he had undergone surgery in 2004.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
STEVE JOBS' famous Reality Distortion Field, created by his feats of persuasive razzle dazzle, gets turned against him in the new movie bearing his name. The wacky, don't-call-it-a-biopic "Steve Jobs" creates a distortion field of its own - it's loosely based on Walter Isaacson's biography, but is obviously and flagrantly slippery in its use of facts. Even its casting is strange. Michael Fassbender looks nothing like Jobs and makes no attempt to mimic him, adding to a wave of dissent from This-Isn't-The-Real-Steve detractors.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
How do you compress 56 years of someone's life - someone with a troubling adoption story, someone considered a visionary of the computer age, someone whose products are used by millions every day, someone who embraced Zen and Wall Street with equal ardor, someone who treated friends, family, and colleagues with disdain if not cruelty, someone who died of cancer at the peak of his career - into a two-hour movie? As far as Aaron Sorkin is concerned, you don't. Presented with the assignment, and the paycheck, to create a screenplay based on the life of Apple and Pixar cofounder Steve Jobs, the Oscar-winning writer of The Social Network looked to try something different, something that wasn't merely a dramatic reenactment of a life.
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NEWS
December 21, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Alicia Vikander pulled off a rare coup two Thursdays ago. That's when the Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced its nominees for the 2016 Golden Globes, and the 27-year-old Swede heard her name - twice. Vikander was nominated in the best actress in a drama category for her turn as artist and illustrator Gerda Wegener in The Danish Girl . She'll be competing (if you want to call it that) against Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, both for Carol , Brie Larson for Room , and Saoirse Ronan for Brooklyn . Vikander also was named in the supporting actress lineup for her eerie and compelling work as a sentient robot in Ex Machina . Her fellow candidates: Jennifer Jason Leigh for The Hateful Eight , Helen Mirren for Trumbo , Kate Winslet for Steve Jobs , and Jane Fonda for Youth . Not bad for an actress who made her feature debut - in the Swedish drama Pure - just five years ago. Interviewed in September when she and her leading-man-turned-lady, Eddie Redmayne, debuted The Danish Girl at the Toronto International Film Festival, Vikander obviously couldn't have anticipated the Golden Globes (or a possible repeat when the Academy Award nominations are announced next month)
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
How do you compress 56 years of someone's life - someone with a troubling adoption story, someone considered a visionary of the computer age, someone whose products are used by millions every day, someone who embraced Zen and Wall Street with equal ardor, someone who treated friends, family, and colleagues with disdain if not cruelty, someone who died of cancer at the peak of his career - into a two-hour movie? As far as Aaron Sorkin is concerned, you don't. Presented with the assignment, and the paycheck, to create a screenplay based on the life of Apple and Pixar cofounder Steve Jobs, the Oscar-winning writer of The Social Network looked to try something different, something that wasn't merely a dramatic reenactment of a life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
"I'm poorly made. " That's Steve Jobs talking - well, wordsmith Aaron Sorkin channeling Steve Jobs - near the end of the film that bears the name of the Apple cofounder and late, lamented, mythologized, criticized tech icon. Jobs (Michael Fassbender) is talking to his daughter, Lisa (Perla Haney-Jardine), a Harvard freshman whose relationship with dad has been rocky, to say the least. First, Jobs denied that he was her father, and even after DNA tests proved paternity, he refused to acknowledge her. In Steve Jobs , directed with cinematic gusto by Danny Boyle from a theater-piece Sorkin script, Lisa comes and goes (ages 5 and 9, two very good young actresses)
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
AARON SORKIN'S hotly debated script for "Steve Jobs" avoids biopic formula, instead looking at the Apple co-founder in the context of three product launches. Sorkin talked with Daily News movie critic Gary Thompson about the movie. Q: "Steve Jobs" is about a particular individual, but it also fits a tradition of movies about American industrial titans, men with whom Jobs has things in common. A: In a way, this character has been around forever. William Randolph Hearst became "Citizen Kane.
NEWS
October 16, 2015 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
STEVE JOBS' famous Reality Distortion Field, created by his feats of persuasive razzle dazzle, gets turned against him in the new movie bearing his name. The wacky, don't-call-it-a-biopic "Steve Jobs" creates a distortion field of its own - it's loosely based on Walter Isaacson's biography, but is obviously and flagrantly slippery in its use of facts. Even its casting is strange. Michael Fassbender looks nothing like Jobs and makes no attempt to mimic him, adding to a wave of dissent from This-Isn't-The-Real-Steve detractors.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Electronic Ink had done the presentation on "data visualizing" to the board of a fictional law firm on the hit TV show The Good Wife , maybe cranky elder partner Howard Lyman wouldn't have thrown up his arms in dismay, declaring "I don't see the use!" On the Oct. 4 broadcast, the firm's young name partner Cary Agos suggested that the partners "listen to new ideas" like working with visual depictions of their workflow "to communicate complex multivariable data" that anyone can grasp.
NEWS
September 13, 2015 | Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Learning to Drive Patricia Clarkson and Ben Kingsley star in this finely honed story of friendship, loneliness, resilience. She's a New York literary critic who has just been dumped by her husband; Kingsley is an Indian Sikh who gives the shell-shocked and suddenly single Upper West Sider driving lessons. The driving metaphors don't need any added emphasis: Put the car (and your life) in forward, be aware and anticipate, control your rage, know where you're going. R Grandma Lily Tomlin's at the top of her game in the title role of Paul Weitz's rich, biting character study, playing a lesbian, a feminist, a prize-winning poet, a failure as a nurturer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tom Hanks, man of letters Seems James Franco and Snooki aren't the only celebs who know how to write stories and poems and books and such. Tom Hanks , 58, the only human on the planet it is impossible to dislike (even we can't help but adore the perennial movie good guy), has signed with Alfred A. Knopf to publish a collection of his short stories. Hanks, who recently published a yarn in the New Yorker, says each story is inspired by a piece from his extensive collection of typewriters.
REAL_ESTATE
August 11, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Klasko is the new president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and the Jefferson Health System. A fan of Star Trek , he wants to push Jefferson forward into the next century - steering away from health care's traditional model of big-edifice hospitals and real estate and instead toward localized medical offices. Jefferson's new offices in Fairmount will aim to do just that. The health-care giant will lease 12,000 square feet at developer Neal Rodin's new project, Rodin Square, putting Jefferson doctors in the same building as apartment dwellers.
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