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Steve Reich

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1986 | By Daniel Webster, Inquirer Music Critic
Something of the 18th century hangs in the air around avant-garde composer Steve Reich. Like the composers of that earlier era, he has been the best performer of his music and the man who has taken full responsibility for bringing it to its audience. Until recently, to have heard a piece of Reich's was to have heard Reich and his ensemble. But music's dependence on its composer-performer poses serious problems for an artist who thinks beyond his own life, and Reich, his 50th birthday looming next fall, is obviously thinking long thoughts about how his works will survive and fit into the grand flow of 20th-century music.
SPORTS
July 17, 1996 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Left winger Trent Klatt is expected to sign a new contract with the Flyers, possibly today. "We're close to signing," Klatt's agent, Jeff Solomon, said yesterday from Carlsbad, Calif. Solomon could have filed for arbitration Monday, but general manager Bob Clarke said yesterday that he thought Klatt would accept the new deal. Klatt earned $437,500 last season. Acquired in a mid-December trade with Dallas for Brent Fedyk, Klatt saw a lot of time on the club's third line with center Joel Otto and left wing Shjon Podein.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
The sense of play in Steve Reich's music is liberating and life- affirmative. Odd, then, that its practitioners look so serious as they tap and beat their way across these soothingly rhythmic scores - and that much of the audience at Sunday's concert by Steve Reich and Musicians also looked intense. Maybe a quarter of those attending had the courage to let their shoulders or ankles move with the gladsome material. Is this American, this sit-straight attitude to enjoyment that surrounds new-music concerts, as opposed to rock or jazz?
NEWS
April 8, 1988 | By TOM DI NARDO, Daily News Classical Music Writer
When pianist Peter Serkin last guested with the Philadelphia Orchestra two years ago, he played a Mozart concerto and a Stravinsky work for piano and orchestra. He'll be repeating the feat under the baton of Wolfgang Sawallisch, conductor of the Bavarian State Opera in Munich, in Academy performances at 2 p.m. today plus 8 p.m. tomorrow and Monday. This time, the works are the Mozart Concerto No. 16 and the Stravinsky "Movements. " It's surprising that the delightful Mozart is receiving an orchestra first performance, but not the pointillistic, atonal and brief (nine minutes)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Philip Glass has been such a constant compositional presence over the last 40 years that only with the arrival of his memoir, Words Without Music (W.W. Norton & Co. $29.95), do you realize how long overdue it is. The book chronicles his Baltimore upbringing, education in Paris, and travels in Europe and India. But it rightly touches on only the major works of his early and middle periods, gracefully leaving the reader to conclude how much the 78-year-old Glassv - who will appear at the Free Library on Tuesday evening - has changed the cutting-edge music world, how that world is run, how pieces are made and disseminated, and the value of his having saved serious music from the hegemony of modernism.
SPORTS
September 7, 1996 | By Tim Panaccio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Flyers free-agent defenseman Petr Svoboda could become the club's first holdout of 1996. "We have significant differences of opinion all around," Svoboda's agent, Steve Reich, said yesterday from his office in Pittsburgh. So much so, that Reich instructed Svoboda to return to his off-season home in Malibu, Calif., this week rather than report to Flyers training camp which opens Thursday. Svoboda and his family returned to New Jersey recently to re-enroll their children in school.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By new-music standards, In C is positively ancient. Terry Riley's seminal work, the catalyst that set minimalism in motion, turns 30 this year. Strangely, nothing about the piece sounds dated, a phenomenon that speaks as much to the work's vigor as to a lack of progress in the minimalist movement. Yet the work is still a child of its time, written for however many musicians are available or feel like playing at the moment. The traditionally inflexible structure of a classical music group was moved one step closer to that of popular music by allowing this freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1989 | By Lesley Valdes, Inquirer Music Critic
This may be the weekend for a drive out of town and some provocative chamber music. The Kronos Quartet needs little introduction, although its programs sometimes do. Typically, the programs are an atypical assortment of 20th-century classical scores, avant-garde sounds, jazz and pop arrangements. Tonight's offerings include New Yorker John Zorn's encyclopedia of cartoon music, Cat O' Nine Tails, a quartet by tango film-master Astor Piazzolla, and minimalist Steve Reich's emotive, quasi-autobiographical work, Different Trains, which was written for the Kronos last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1999 | By Miriam Seidel, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Field Exchange offers dancers from different cities a loose network for sharing and creating work. As a bonus, audiences get a chance to see talent from different places. Too bad more people didn't take advantage of this opportunity over the weekend, when Group Motion presented an interesting program of choreographers and dancers from Atlanta and Miami as well as Philadelphia. Atlantans opened the program at Kumquat with Sue Schroeder's half light, for two dancers. While one of them (Laney Abernethy Dabalos)
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Like Mother Nature - where would we all be without DNA? - Gertrude Stein was fond of repetition. As she wrote in her novel The Making of Americans , "Repeating is the whole of living and by repeating comes understanding. " Well, I wonder. Or I did until I watched a good portion of a nearly hour-long film called Fase at the Institute of Contemporary Art. The film, by Belgian Thierry De Mey, focuses on two female dancers as they execute a series of synchronized spins and movements that suggest vigorous calisthenics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Philip Glass has been such a constant compositional presence over the last 40 years that only with the arrival of his memoir, Words Without Music (W.W. Norton & Co. $29.95), do you realize how long overdue it is. The book chronicles his Baltimore upbringing, education in Paris, and travels in Europe and India. But it rightly touches on only the major works of his early and middle periods, gracefully leaving the reader to conclude how much the 78-year-old Glassv - who will appear at the Free Library on Tuesday evening - has changed the cutting-edge music world, how that world is run, how pieces are made and disseminated, and the value of his having saved serious music from the hegemony of modernism.
NEWS
May 26, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
Like Mother Nature - where would we all be without DNA? - Gertrude Stein was fond of repetition. As she wrote in her novel The Making of Americans , "Repeating is the whole of living and by repeating comes understanding. " Well, I wonder. Or I did until I watched a good portion of a nearly hour-long film called Fase at the Institute of Contemporary Art. The film, by Belgian Thierry De Mey, focuses on two female dancers as they execute a series of synchronized spins and movements that suggest vigorous calisthenics.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
The musical instruments look like something you'd see in the lumber department of Home Depot. Playing them requires great skill and stamina, but no special alchemy. Yet there's one element that's more conjured than contrived in Michael Gordon's new percussion work, Timber : It has a halo, an ethereal aura of sound that's likely to waft up from the welter of six percussionists at Friday's concert at Crane Arts in Northern Liberties. Produced by Bower Bird, the concert is part of a national tour by Mantra Percussion, which co-commissioned the piece.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
NEW YORK - As musical cult figures go, few insinuate themselves as quietly, effortlessly, and completely as Ryuichi Sakamoto, who performs Sunday at Glenside's Keswick Theatre. Like a latter-day Erik Satie, the 58-year-old Japanese composer sits reflectively at the piano, sounding chords that ripple like pebbles dropped in still water, warranting contemplation but just as content to be simply enjoyed. Is it ambient music? New Age? Classical? Lack of classification for this rocker turned film composer turned solo performer seems not to have deterred 1.4 million people from accessing some of his more popular videos on YouTube.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
Bang on a Can Marathon . In the time it takes to fly to Istanbul, the Bang on a Can Marathon, which made its Philadelphia debut Sunday as part of the Live Arts Festival, went around the world of cutting-edge music with stopovers in Burma and Turkey, plus a side excursion into outer space. Explanation: The 10-hour one-day music fest at World Cafe Live featured Burmese artist Kyaw Kyaw Naing playing a set of 21 tuned drums, Philadelphia choir The Crossing singing the Turkish minimalism of Kamran Ince with Gloria (Everywhere)
NEWS
September 13, 2010
Bang on a Can Marathon . In the time it takes to fly to Istanbul, the Bang on a Can Marathon, which made its Philadelphia debut Sunday as part of the Live Arts Festival, went around the world of cutting-edge music with stopovers in Burma and Turkey, plus a side excursion into outer space. Explanation: The 10-hour one-day music fest at World Cafe Live featured Burmese artist Kyaw Kyaw Naing playing a set of 21 tuned drums, Philadelphia choir The Crossing singing the Turkish minimalism of Kamran Ince with Gloria (Everywhere)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2010 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, takiffj@phillynews.com 215-854-5960
Behind most intriguing bands is an equally smart and energetic creator, with lots to share in conversation, too. Such proved true in a recent chat with Barry Hyde , front guy of the British post-punk band the Futureheads . Their fourth album, "The Chaos," drops in the States on Tuesday, the day before the guys hit town for a show with the promising all-girl group the Like . This should rev devotees with dynamic and dexterous approaches to...
NEWS
June 23, 2009 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
A lit-smart coming-of-age story where money, lust, suicide, and angst intertwine - this isn't an episode of Gossip Girl or a bad day on The Hills. It's Spring Awakening, the 2006 Off-Broadway alt-musical that, on its move to Broadway, became the winner of eight 2007 Tony Awards including best musical, direction, book, and score. It opens tonight at the Academy of Music. The show made quick theater superstars out of two unlike-lies: composer Duncan Sheik and lyricist/librettist Steven Sater.
NEWS
June 12, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Was it enough just to be there? The dilapidated Royal Theater, a curious but imposing shadow on the 1500 block of South Street, had its first concert audience in roughly 40 years on Wednesday as part of the Hidden City Festival, with music commissioned by Network for New Music for the occasion, though many (including me) would've shown up if only to watch the paint peel. What a place! The movie and performance theater - opened in 1920 specifically for the African American community - closed in 1970 and is now the worse for wear.
NEWS
March 3, 2009 | By David Patrick Stearns INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Classical music people can be so hungry for a piece of the mainstream - or even a bit of mainstream notoriety - that they don't always know when they're selling themselves short. That didn't quite happen in two new-music encounters over the weekend, but the possibility was on the horizon with both - when the Brentano Quartet played Lee Hyla's Howl Sunday at the Independence Seaport Museum, and when the already-experimental Bang on a Can All-Stars gave the second half of their Saturday Kimmel Center concert to percussionist Glenn Kotche, best-known as the drummer for the respected band Wilco.
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