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Stewardship

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NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The odds appear stacked in Parx Casino's favor. At a public input hearing Thursday ahead of a township vote on whether to renew the casino's gaming license, comments from township and state officials and regulators were almost universally in favor of renewal. "This has not only been a home run," State Rep. Gene DiGirolamo (R., Bucks) said of the eight-year-old casino. "This has absolutely been a grand slam for Bensalem Township. " Parx officials opened the meeting with a presentation about the gaming facility, discussing the millions of dollars of tax proceeds that have gone to the township, the 2,000 jobs the casino supports, and its donations to community groups.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - George Zimmermann calls it a "living classroom. " Leaving PowerPoint presentations and books behind at Stockton University, the professor leads his students into the Pine Barrens that surround the Atlantic County school like a vast emerald ocean. They walk among shortleaf pines, white oaks, red maples, and Atlantic white cedars while taking up tough questions: How can they manage the forest's health? How can they protect it from fires, pathogens, and insects?
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
Holding paper hearts in front of them, students from 60 area schools line up to present their gifts and donations to shelters for the homeless in the city's Board of Education auditorium yesterday. The students' gesture of stewardship was all part of the School District's Share Your Love Program, set up by the Department of Human Services.
NEWS
March 23, 1989
LORENZO FOR SECRETARY OF DEFENSE? We're disappointed at the selection of Congressman Cheney (as secretary of defense). Not, let us hasten to say, that we have anything against him. No doubt he's a splendid fellow. But we had hoped that, were Mr. Bush to feel a compelling need to send up a new nominee, he would have considered Frank Lorenzo. To begin with, the choice would have solved two problems in a single stroke: ending the Eastern Airlines strike and finding a replacement for the ill-destined Mr. Tower.
NEWS
December 9, 2003 | By Philip C. Ehlinger, Jr
Doylestown Borough is a rare example of a community that has successfully fought off the economic distress that plagues nearly a third of the region's small towns and boroughs. What we have learned is that small-town economies are fragile and require constant nurturing and active stewardship. In the face of competition from malls, office parks and strip centers, small towns such as ours must work harder to attract shoppers, investors and business. Much of Doylestown's current prosperity is a result of 40 years of successful revitalization programs.
NEWS
June 1, 2001
In the serene cathedral of the most magnificent trees on Earth, President Bush delivered an eloquent message on environmental stewardship Wednesday. "In our daily lives, we're surrounded by things of our own making - buildings and machines and goods we create ourselves," he said at Sequoia National Park in California. "But come here and you're reminded of a design that is not our own. Here we find a grandeur beyond our power to equal. " He wisely observed that stewardship is a public value, and a healthy environment requires active national government.
NEWS
January 30, 1999
One of the finest passages in the Pennsylvania Constitution is this simple, elegant admonition: "The people have a right to clean air, pure water, and to the preservation of the natural, scenic, historic and aesthetic values of the environment. Pennsylvania's public natural resources are the common property of all people, including generations yet to come. " But the language in this passage has not always been honored by the state. The awful legacy of Pennsylvania's coal mining is just one example of the commonwealth's failure to be the best steward of the land and the water.
NEWS
February 13, 2011
Much has been written recently about the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) and related projects, including the Arlen Specter Library planned for Philadelphia University ("Rendell inspires a grant backlash," Sunday). The Specter Library would aid in advancing education and preserving historical documents relating to some of the country's most significant events of the last half-century. Through documents, photos, recordings, and other materials, this library would help preserve the complex texture of such events as the Warren Commission, Supreme Court confirmation hearings, and legislative action.
NEWS
March 16, 1987
We read almost daily in your pages of the "takers" from our city - the greedy, the avaricious and the corrupt. Last month we lost a "giver" to our city - Fredric R. Mann. Thirty-five years ago as a young student sitting on the grass listening at the Robinhood Dell, I did not know the force that made such a wonderful experience possible. Subsequently, however, as a member of the Fairmount Park Commission for 24 years, I was able to observe this "force" at work. Fred Mann did things and made things happen.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. - George Zimmermann calls it a "living classroom. " Leaving PowerPoint presentations and books behind at Stockton University, the professor leads his students into the Pine Barrens that surround the Atlantic County school like a vast emerald ocean. They walk among shortleaf pines, white oaks, red maples, and Atlantic white cedars while taking up tough questions: How can they manage the forest's health? How can they protect it from fires, pathogens, and insects?
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The odds appear stacked in Parx Casino's favor. At a public input hearing Thursday ahead of a township vote on whether to renew the casino's gaming license, comments from township and state officials and regulators were almost universally in favor of renewal. "This has not only been a home run," State Rep. Gene DiGirolamo (R., Bucks) said of the eight-year-old casino. "This has absolutely been a grand slam for Bensalem Township. " Parx officials opened the meeting with a presentation about the gaming facility, discussing the millions of dollars of tax proceeds that have gone to the township, the 2,000 jobs the casino supports, and its donations to community groups.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Weigh anchor Former Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman is correct in his assessment of the historic value of the USS Olympia, a maritime monument to the Spanish-American War ("Saving a great old ship," Oct. 6). One only has to step on board to sense her history. The plan to move the Olympia to Dry Dock No. 1 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard has merit, and I would suggest taking the USS Becuna. Taking these ships from the Independence Seaport Museum is the first step in saving them.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
THE ROYAL THEATER was going to rise after decades of neglect, and it would be glorious, just glorious. That was the talk back in the fall of 2000, when Kenny Gamble's Universal Cos. purchased the historic African-American theater and some neighboring parcels from the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia for $250,000. Gamble said at the time that he envisioned the reborn Royal as a live-music mecca that would trigger a stirring revival of South Street west of Broad - new shops, new restaurants, new possibilities.
NEWS
August 13, 2012
There are two ways to run against President Obama: stewardship or ideology. You can run against his record or you can run against his ideas. The stewardship case is pretty straightforward: the worst recovery in U.S. history, 42 consecutive months of 8-plus percent unemployment, declining economic growth - all achieved at a price of another $5 trillion of accumulated debt. The ideological case is also simple. Just play in toto (and therefore in context) Obama's Roanoke riff telling small-business owners: "You didn't build that.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By MARY MAZZONI, mazzonm@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Two local fishing enthusiasts are out to prove that the "dirty Delaware" isn't so dirty after all by organizing Philadelphia's first Striped Bass Fishing Derby. The derby - from Sunday through June 5 on the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers - is the brainchild of local anglers Len Albright, 30, and Jason Strohl, 32 - longtime friends who bonded over their shared love of fishing. "We learned about the striped bass in the Delaware and Schuylkill rivers and realized that most people don't even know there are fish in those rivers," Albright said.
NEWS
February 13, 2011
Much has been written recently about the Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program (RACP) and related projects, including the Arlen Specter Library planned for Philadelphia University ("Rendell inspires a grant backlash," Sunday). The Specter Library would aid in advancing education and preserving historical documents relating to some of the country's most significant events of the last half-century. Through documents, photos, recordings, and other materials, this library would help preserve the complex texture of such events as the Warren Commission, Supreme Court confirmation hearings, and legislative action.
NEWS
December 29, 2008
Misdirected effort Every week or two, a letter to the editor questions the move of the Barnes Foundation to Center City. However, to my recollection, there has never been a time when its neighbors or Lower Merion in any way tried to assist the foundation to stay and make the priceless art collection readily available to others. Almost everyone who can get a ticket and wait for their future date to see it still gets lost trying to find the Barnes. No signs, no sidewalks. Within 100 feet of the entry you will finally see signs reading "Save the Barnes.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | By Tim Johnson INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
This industrial city gets its tap water from a river that flows sudsy and dark. City plants treat the water, but many people boil it and drink it with trepidation. As China gallops toward the modern era, access to safe and clean drinking water is beyond the reach of hundreds of millions of rural and urban people. Chemical spills, rampant pollution, and poor stewardship of the land have tainted much of the nation's water supply, and the groundwater under 90 percent of China's cities is contaminated.
NEWS
April 8, 2005 | By Jonah Goldberg
Jonah Goldberg is a nationally syndicated columnist Bad news: A new United Nations report says the world's coming to an end. But, first, some good news: America's doing great! Seriously, forests are breaking out all over America. New England has more forests since the Civil War. In 1880, New York State was only 25 percent forested. Today, it is more than 66 percent. In 1850, Vermont was only 35 percent forested. Now it's 76 percent forested and rising. In the South, more land is covered by forest than at any time in the last century.
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