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Sticky Fingers

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1988 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Meet Melanie Mayron, your new best friend. She's so nice and funny and sweet and pretty, you just want to be pals with her for life. And here she sits, spotted-pony cowboy boots on the coffee table, talking about birth control and money and boys and girlfriends and shopping and all that other stuff. Mayron plays free-lance photographer Melissa on thirtysomething. Melissa, like Mayron, is nice and funny and sweet and pretty, although she's more insecure and fragile and doesn't get as much steady work as the actress.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | By Ben Yagoda, Daily News Movie Critic
I suppose "Stcky Fingers" is good for one thing, which is to prove that it's not as easy as it looks. A recent group of films - "After Hours" and "Desperately Seeking Susan" are examples - have focused on life on the edge in downtown New York. These movies are usually enjoyable, but they have an improvised, off-the-wall quality; they make you think that anybody with a camera and a group of uninhibited friends could come up with something just as good. On the evidence of "Sticky Fingers," this is not the case.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
It would be tempting to comment ecstatically on the strange brew of luck and pluck that lifted the Philadelphia Eagles to an unforgettable victory at Lincoln Financial Field Sunday night. Tempting to extol the alchemy of team that lifted our wounded, stumbling heroes from the pit of early-exit despair to the brink of glory. Tempting to praise Donovan McNabb's gyroscopic feet, Duce Staley's piston legs, Brian Dawkins' fiery leadership, David Akers' resilient ego, and Freddie Mitchell's sticky fingers.
NEWS
September 13, 1988 | By Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
For the longest time, her life resembled a movie script. Her movie script. The one about two artistic best friends who couldn't really make it big-time, whose lives were a series of near-misses and wishful thinking. But like the movie, there was a happy ending. After five years of going broke trying to find backers for her movie, actress Melanie Mayron finally got, "corny as it sounds, My Dream": "Sticky Fingers" made it to the screen. And while the movie critics have been less than kind, she loved it. Her folks loved it. Her friends loved it. And in the end that's all that really mattered, anyway.
FOOD
October 10, 1999 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: E-Z-Rol garlic peeler Manufacturer: The Omessi Group Ltd., Northridge, Calif. Where: Kitchen Kapers (all locations) Price: $7.99 Purpose: Peels raw garlic cloves This peeler, which looks like a soft plastic cannoli cylinder, will prove indispensable to anyone with a bumper crop of basil and a desire to turn it all into pesto before the first frost. The instructions are almost too easy to believe: Place one clove of raw garlic inside the flexible 5 1/2-inch tube and roll the tube on a flat surface with a gentle downward pressure until the garlic skin makes a crackling sound.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | Harry Gross
DEAR HARRY: I'm writing to you as a last resort. I have tried to get an attorney to take my case, but they either refused or charged a fee that I cannot afford. I worked for a company for more than 15 years ending in 1995. I retired late last year and called the company to inquire about getting my pension. I was told that they sent me a check back in 1993 to cover all the money in the plan. I was still employed there in 1993 and made contributions until 1995, so I was not entitled to a check, nor did I ever get one. I tried to get help from our local labor board, but no one ever got back to me even after several calls.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
George Washington created Halloween because he had a terrible sweet tooth. Only good people give out good candy. Mom and dad have sticky fingers. And carting around your booty in a plastic pumpkin is way uncool. Welcome to the round table talk at Chadds Ford Elementary School, featuring a fidgety pack of first graders. They've offered to share their expertise and opinions about the one night when moaning ghosts and steely Supermans rise from the imagination to haunt neighborhoods in search of sweets.
NEWS
January 12, 1987 | BY DON WILLIAMSON
Call it Harry Higgins Complex (HHC). The symptoms are sticky fingers, greedy hearts and loose standards. People with the affliction come in all sizes, shapes, ages, sexes and colors. One thing they seem to have in common is the belief they're smarter than everyone else. The ailment is named for a guy who made more than $8,500 for himself with a little real estate deal he turned while receiving inside information as president of East Falls Community Council. It might seem odd to name such a widespread malady for one man in one tiny Pennsylvania neighborhood.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Every time Carla Robinson strains to free herself from the poverty of Camden's crippled streets, the sticky fingers of the welfare system yank her back. Check out her resume. Served with the Army as a clerk at Fort Bliss, Texas. Studied computers and word processing at Lincoln Technical Institute in Pennsauken and Harris School of Business. Worked for a local credit corporation and a nonprofit group that helped Vietnam veterans find jobs. Now, at age 33, living as a welfare mother with three daughters in the projects of South Camden.
SPORTS
July 29, 1998 | by Edward G. Robinson, III, Daily News Sports Writer
Imagine two sons, about 5, Wiffle balls in hand, juicy bubble gum in jaws, poking around dad's closet for the old man's cleats. Once their sticky fingers have secured the treasures from the chest, tiny feet are stuck into way-too-big shoes. The kids prance around, guarding a make-believe outfield, trying to be just like their pops. They don't know quite how hard their dad's baseball shoes are to fill, but they make strides and have fun. Just as kids do. Now wake up. Garry Maddox II and Gary Matthews Jr. aren't kids anymore.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | Harry Gross
DEAR HARRY: I'm writing to you as a last resort. I have tried to get an attorney to take my case, but they either refused or charged a fee that I cannot afford. I worked for a company for more than 15 years ending in 1995. I retired late last year and called the company to inquire about getting my pension. I was told that they sent me a check back in 1993 to cover all the money in the plan. I was still employed there in 1993 and made contributions until 1995, so I was not entitled to a check, nor did I ever get one. I tried to get help from our local labor board, but no one ever got back to me even after several calls.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2004 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's not easy being a punk rocker. Sometimes that DIY ethic can wear a guy down. "People don't go out and buy our records," says Mike Herrera, the singer, bass player and songwriter for MxPx. "We have to sell each and every record ourselves. We have to talk to each kid individually, sell every ticket to every show. It's insane. " Take the last time the influential skate-punk trio was in Pennsylvania. "It was like an in-store [appearance] in Bethlehem and we were playing the next night in Lancaster," Herrera says.
NEWS
January 13, 2004
It would be tempting to comment ecstatically on the strange brew of luck and pluck that lifted the Philadelphia Eagles to an unforgettable victory at Lincoln Financial Field Sunday night. Tempting to extol the alchemy of team that lifted our wounded, stumbling heroes from the pit of early-exit despair to the brink of glory. Tempting to praise Donovan McNabb's gyroscopic feet, Duce Staley's piston legs, Brian Dawkins' fiery leadership, David Akers' resilient ego, and Freddie Mitchell's sticky fingers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2002 | REGINA MEDINA E!Online and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
NO MORE hearings, interrupted, for waifish star Winona Ryder. A Beverly Hills judge postponed yesterday, once again, a preliminary hearing into shoplifting charges against America's favorite accused sticky-fingered actress. June 3 is the "must go" date, ruled Superior Court Judge Elden Fox. He set the new date "on the understanding that this is a must go hearing" and ordered Ryder, her lawyer, and defense and prosecution witnesses to appear in court on that day. While prosecutors complained that they've been ready for trial since March, Ryder's camp told Fox that the actress's main lawyer has a court appearance in a murder case.
FOOD
October 10, 1999 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: E-Z-Rol garlic peeler Manufacturer: The Omessi Group Ltd., Northridge, Calif. Where: Kitchen Kapers (all locations) Price: $7.99 Purpose: Peels raw garlic cloves This peeler, which looks like a soft plastic cannoli cylinder, will prove indispensable to anyone with a bumper crop of basil and a desire to turn it all into pesto before the first frost. The instructions are almost too easy to believe: Place one clove of raw garlic inside the flexible 5 1/2-inch tube and roll the tube on a flat surface with a gentle downward pressure until the garlic skin makes a crackling sound.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | By Bridget Eklund, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
George Washington created Halloween because he had a terrible sweet tooth. Only good people give out good candy. Mom and dad have sticky fingers. And carting around your booty in a plastic pumpkin is way uncool. Welcome to the round table talk at Chadds Ford Elementary School, featuring a fidgety pack of first graders. They've offered to share their expertise and opinions about the one night when moaning ghosts and steely Supermans rise from the imagination to haunt neighborhoods in search of sweets.
SPORTS
July 29, 1998 | by Edward G. Robinson, III, Daily News Sports Writer
Imagine two sons, about 5, Wiffle balls in hand, juicy bubble gum in jaws, poking around dad's closet for the old man's cleats. Once their sticky fingers have secured the treasures from the chest, tiny feet are stuck into way-too-big shoes. The kids prance around, guarding a make-believe outfield, trying to be just like their pops. They don't know quite how hard their dad's baseball shoes are to fill, but they make strides and have fun. Just as kids do. Now wake up. Garry Maddox II and Gary Matthews Jr. aren't kids anymore.
LIVING
July 23, 1995 | By Julie Stoiber Inquirer correspondent Jeff Eckhoff provided research assistance
THE LETTER ARRIVED ONE DAY last July, out of the blue. Cleo Priest didn't think much of it. The return address was David M. Weinfeld's. Her lawyer. Big deal, thought Cleo, opening the taped-shut envelope. Just another link in the long, confusing paper chain that had begun six years earlier, after her husband died from lung cancer and Weinfeld filed suit on her behalf against a group of asbestos companies. There had been affidavits, interrogatories - all sorts of paperwork that Cleo, being a teller at the Garden State racetrack and not a lawyer, did not really understand.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | By GEORGE F. WILL
It makes you wonder what bees did to keep themselves busy before the federal government organized and subsidized them. If Bill Clinton keeps his promise about the honey program, many beekeepers will go bust, and much important pollination will not happen, and the cost to the economy will be staggering. Or so the beekeepers say. Last summer, candidate Clinton, casting around for a way to seem frugal, and eager, as always, to make as few people as possible cross, said that as president he would end the price-support program for honey.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
For Wanda Dade, who works in Center City, holiday time is her busy season. But her job isn't selling clothes, or baking pies, or wrapping presents. Dade, an officer in the Philadelphia Police Department's central division, helps round up suspected shoplifters from the city's stores. Each day, she rides on a kind of shoplifter's shuttle, a police wagon that loops throughout Center City. She and fellow officers respond to calls from headquarters and from stores to pick up and process suspected shoplifters.
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