CollectionsStigma
IN THE NEWS

Stigma

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | By Angela Valdez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If John Modugno feels good, he reminds himself that it won't last long. But he doesn't curse his condition. He has lived with grand mal epilepsy since age 4, and he is used to the routines of living in a body that at least once a week deprives him of control. He walks from his Burlington City home to the grocery store several times a week because he can carry only a few days' worth of food. The pain shooting through his feet slows him, and it takes half an hour to walk the few short blocks.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Joseph A. Rogers
In more than 20 years as an organizer and an advocate, I've repeatedly noticed that when the federal government doesn't want to spend money or, more particularly, raise taxes, it issues reports. I remember a time about 10 years ago when homelessness was seen as a crisis in our country. I went to literally dozens of meetings in Washington in which various government agencies competed in issuing reports that described the problems of the homeless in great detail, showed real understanding about the issues and articulated wonderful solutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, neurologist William Young of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's Headache Center has heard his patients say how bad they felt when other people did not take their migraines seriously. "Every day, I hear stories of the ignorant or mean-spirited things people say to them about having their disease," he said. "People make it obvious that they think they're morally weak because they're not functioning well because of a mere headache. " He says the federal government has the same attitude when it comes to researching the condition, which affects 12 percent of the adult population and can leave some people in terrible pain more days than not. So, when an intern asked about a research topic, Young jumped at the chance to study stigma in migraine patients.
NEWS
November 22, 1994 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Three experts hired by a former Philadelphia-area defense contractor, a native of Egypt, told a federal judge yesterday that putting the man in jail could doom his four daughters to spinsterhood. That's because of the "stigma" that Egyptians of the Muslim faith attach to fatherless households, the experts opined. But U.S. District Judge Eduardo Robreno was unmoved by the argument. He said he couldn't show leniency to the defendant, Kamal Kaga, because Kaga had sold to the U.S. military many defective parts that could have injured U.S. soldiers.
NEWS
May 26, 2001 | By Gov. Tom Ridge
In the 19th century, a crusading journalist and native Pennsylvanian named Nellie Bly exposed the degrading conditions endured by patients in a New York mental hospital: primitive treatment methods; poor food; physical restraint; and isolation. Her writings shocked the nation and helped change the way we treat mental illness. As a society, we can be proud of the progress we've made. The discovery of effective, long-term treatment options, and better services for patients and families have helped many reclaim their freedom and their lives.
LIVING
March 23, 1993 | By Shelly Phillips, FOR THE INQUIRER
Alan Goodman will be the first to tell you he's successful. But 20 years ago, his Broomall neighbors wondered why his car sat in the driveway so much. And they were curious about his comings and goings, always with a briefcase. Their conclusion: He must be a bookie, or at the very least doing something mildly illegal. Hardly. Alan Goodman owns shopping centers and office buildings, has an insurance business and tracks his sizable investments. But he works from home. Years ago when he started, Goodman felt that the commercial world viewed him as not quite professional.
NEWS
October 26, 2002 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Satcher hasn't been surgeon general since February, but he still sounded like one yesterday as he extolled better treatment and insurance for the mentally ill at the annual meeting of the Pennsylvania chapter of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill. Satcher, who was the first surgeon general to write a report specifically about mental health, said improving treatment for those with mental illnesses needs to be a national priority....
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | By GEORGE F. WILL
President Clinton, although greedy for laurels as government's reinventor, is parsimonious with proposals offensive to the inventors of modern government - liberals, the faction of "compassion. " So while making a monomania of his radical response to the spurious crisis in health care, he now produces a mild response to the lethal crisis in welfare. The crux of his welfare plan is its cosmetic conservatism, the supposed two-year limit on benefits, after which recipients must find work or take subsidized private- or public-sector jobs.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - In the final days of Jovan Belcher's life, he could have taken advantage of numerous avenues for support provided by the Kansas City Chiefs and the NFL. This past July, the NFL established an emergency hotline that operates 24 hours a day and connects players, staff, and family members in crisis with mental-health professionals who are not affiliated with the league or its teams. There are also numerous symposiums and support personnel whose jobs are to ensure the well-being of the players.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 14, 2014
Campaign litter I wonder if congressional candidate Brendan F. Boyle would let me know where he lives so that, on my next trash day, instead of leaving my trash at the curb to be picked up, I can spread it around his neighborhood for all to see. If he doesn't think this is a good idea, why is he leaving his trash - that is, political signs - all over my neighborhood? It's trash and an eyesore, and I expect better from anyone seeking my vote. Ken Myers, Lafayette Hill Disclosure salute Responding to a letter from a group of retired Pennsylvania judges, only 11 of 47 congressional candidates in the Pennsylvania Primary committed to support federal legislation that would require full, complete, and immediate disclosure of all contributions exceeding $10,000.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
By Bob Mensch and Jay Costa The term welfare is defined as the general well-being of an individual or group of individuals. However, when used in association with government services, the term has, unfortunately, developed a negative connotation. One state agency that suffers from the use of the term is the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare. This name isn't even an accurate description of what the agency does. Ninety-five percent of the department's funding is focused on health and human-services programs, not traditional welfare programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years, neurologist William Young of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital's Headache Center has heard his patients say how bad they felt when other people did not take their migraines seriously. "Every day, I hear stories of the ignorant or mean-spirited things people say to them about having their disease," he said. "People make it obvious that they think they're morally weak because they're not functioning well because of a mere headache. " He says the federal government has the same attitude when it comes to researching the condition, which affects 12 percent of the adult population and can leave some people in terrible pain more days than not. So, when an intern asked about a research topic, Young jumped at the chance to study stigma in migraine patients.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2013
"One of the greatest losses in not expanding Medicaid [is the loss of] opportunity to put together all the various pieces of the system. " - Al Black, COO, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. " . . . We cannot ignore the $4.1 billion in state-only taxpayer costs over the next eight years that could occur as a result of expanding Medicaid in Pennsylvania. " - Carey Miller, spokeswoman, Pennsylvania Department of Welfare. "It's confirmation of a trend.
SPORTS
December 7, 2012 | Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - In the final days of Jovan Belcher's life, he could have taken advantage of numerous avenues for support provided by the Kansas City Chiefs and the NFL. This past July, the NFL established an emergency hotline that operates 24 hours a day and connects players, staff, and family members in crisis with mental-health professionals who are not affiliated with the league or its teams. There are also numerous symposiums and support personnel whose jobs are to ensure the well-being of the players.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2012 | Dear Abby
DEAR ABBY: What's the best thing to do when someone insults me for being myself? My hair has been bright blue for the past two semesters of college. I like it. I'm young, and my family is letting me express my "wild" side while I'm in school. Six months ago I went to meet my ex-boyfriend's mother, and the first thing she said to me was, "You're one of my son's phases, right? Boys don't actually bring girls with blue hair home to Mama. " Abby, it was with my ex's encouragement that I dyed my hair this bright color.
NEWS
July 28, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
With his 46-year-old schizophrenic son in jail, Sam Ruggieri wasn't thrilled about the lack of psychiatric care available behind bars. But he couldn't help looking at recent headlines involving mental illness and wondering about the alternative. In March, a 23-year-old Upper Merion man fatally stabbed his parents and twin brother after years of struggling with what relatives had decided was schizophrenia. Then, last month, a Hatfield police lieutenant shot and killed his 17-year-old son while fending off an attack from the teen a day after a mental-health clinic had released him. "How can you not hear stories like that and think about your own situation?"
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
In past contract negotiations at the Philadelphia Orchestra, it has been musicians who have quietly held, or explicitly exercised, the threat of damaging action: a strike. But in current talks, it is management tolling unprecedented and severe consequences: bankruptcy. Management has intermittently used the prospect of Chapter 11 in talks during the last few months in its drive to reduce labor costs, people familiar with the talks say. Players - who could see a 20 percent cut in base pay and the loss of 10 positions - are taking the threat seriously.
LIVING
March 4, 2009 | By Reid R. Frazier FOR THE INQUIRER
On their first date, Mike Englisch and Kelly Magnin started with a classic icebreaker - where do you live? Englisch, 24, wondered if Magnin, 23, would find his answer a turnoff. It turned out that Magnin was worried about exactly the same thing. "One of us said, 'I live at home with my parents,' " says Englisch, "and there was that awkward moment of silence before the other one was like, 'Oh, I do, too.' " It may not be the most glamorous of digs, but more twentysomethings may look to Mom and Dad for shelter during the recession.
NEWS
October 29, 2008 | Cindy Bass
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's decision to end a food program for Philadelphia schoolchildren smacks of the kind of "compassionate" conservatism we have had to contend with for eight years. More than 120,000 children count on the 17-year-old Universal Feeding Program, which provides free meals to every student in some schools, instead of requiring applications. In case USDA officials are ignorant of the successes of school feeding programs, I invite them to read one Philadelphia story: mine.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|