CollectionsStock Certificates
IN THE NEWS

Stock Certificates

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 3, 1990 | By Glenn Burkins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investors who enjoy the feel of stock certificates can breathe easy. A plan to eliminate the documents all but died last week before the Securities and Exchange Commission. For some time, a group of Wall Street and banking executives has been looking for ways to speed the settlement time for stock trades. One idea was to do away with paper certificates in favor of an electronic bookkeeping system that would record buys and sells. That idea, however, never gained favor with individual investors.
NEWS
September 4, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's the summer of Watergate and the Munich Olympics - June 1972 - and you heard about a little company with 40,000 cable-TV subscribers that was selling stock in an initial public offering for the modest amount of $7 a share. What the heck - you told your broker to go for it and bought 1,000 shares in Comcast Corp. Bad move, it seemed. Those $7 shares quickly plunged to 75 cents because of broader economic worries during the Nixon administration and the Mideast oil crisis. You threw the stock certificates in a drawer and hoped for the best.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1989 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Consider a stock certificate. It's a colorful document, sometimes embossed with a detailed drawing of a corporate logo, factory or building. It has your name on the front and the number of shares that you own in the issuing company. It's your piece of Corporate America. But do you really need it? A group of prominent Wall Street and banking executives doesn't think so and is urging the securities industry to phase out stock certificates in favor of electronic bookkeeping.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2012 | By Christina Rexrode, Associated Press
Bob Kerstein loves his paper stock certificates. At a time when stock trading is dominated by rapid-fire computers, he relishes paper stocks for their palpability. Wall Street seems cryptic and far away, but certificates are something he can see and hold. They're a pleasant throwback, a tangible marker of company history, a wisp of inky artwork in a canyon of electronic solemnity. So when Facebook went public this year and decided not to print paper stock certificates, Kerstein was bummed.
NEWS
September 12, 1991 | By Vyola P. Willson and Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A suave Main Line swindler has pleaded guilty to federal securities and mail fraud charges in California, four days before his trial was to begin. Thomas D. Dempsey, 52, entered the plea on Friday in U.S. District Court in Santa Barbara and will be sentenced there on Oct. 28. He faces a maximum sentence of 30 years' imprisonment and a fine of $1.5 million. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeffrey B. Isaacs, who handled the case in California, said he did not expect Dempsey to be tried in Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1999 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1871, the Union & Titusville Railroad Co. of Pennsylvania issued 100 shares of stock for $50 each to investor James Fisk Jr. - for a total of $5,000. This weekend, Fisk's stock certificate, now 128 years old, could sell for $15,000 to $25,000 at an auction near Lancaster. The certificate for the railroad shares is one of many that may no longer be worth anything to an investor but is worth a lot of money to a scripophile, a collector of rare and historic stock and bond certificates.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | By Emilie Lounsberry, Inquirer Staff Writer
A former high-ranking civilian at the Defense Personnel Supply Center in South Philadelphia was sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison for accepting $331,000 in payoffs in what the government called one of the most pervasive procurement frauds in recent Pentagon history. Frank L. Coccia, 55, who was deputy director of the center's clothing branch, apologized for his actions but told U.S. District Judge Edmund V. Ludwig that he had no explanation for why he accepted the money from clothing and textile contractors doing business with the center.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1990 | By Richard Burke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The operators of a private South Jersey investment club that promised annual profits of 24 percent were accused in federal court yesterday of defrauding clients of more than $5 million over 16 years. The allegations were in a complaint filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission, which is seeking, among other things, the appointment of a trustee to distribute what is left of the club's money. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia, charges Joseph W. Buecker Jr. of Palermo, Cape May County, N.J., and John A. Petrillo of Warminster with violating federal securities laws through the investment club they founded in 1973.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1992 | By Anita Myette, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some people dispute whether Columbus did, but there's no arguing that you can - through a show called Discover America through Antiques, to be held this weekend at Cedar Crest College in Allentown. The benefit for United Cerebral Palsy of the Lehigh Valley is expected to draw more than 25 dealers, bringing in a variety of furniture, glass objects, Victoriana, toys and more. The show will be held in the school's Lees Hall, Cedar Crest Boulevard. Admission is $3.50. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 to 5 Sunday.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1987 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
Butcher & Singer yesterday became the latest brokerage house to run afoul of the Securities & Exchange Commission's crackdown on insider trading. The SEC suspended the brokerage for 30 days from engaging in certain over- the-counter stock trading activities, starting Feb. 2. The penalty is for an alleged stock forgery and insider trading scheme that took place at the Philadelphia firm 10 years ago. "For awhile, with Boesky and Levine and et cetera, we thought they had bigger fish to fry down there," said Butcher & Singer spokeswoman Rebecca Brown.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2013 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's the summer of Watergate and the Munich Olympics - June 1972 - and you heard about a little company with 40,000 cable-TV subscribers that was selling stock in an initial public offering for the modest amount of $7 a share. What the heck - you told your broker to go for it and bought 1,000 shares in Comcast Corp. Bad move, it seemed. Those $7 shares quickly plunged to 75 cents because of broader economic worries during the Nixon administration and the Mideast oil crisis. You threw the stock certificates in a drawer and hoped for the best.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2012 | By Christina Rexrode, Associated Press
Bob Kerstein loves his paper stock certificates. At a time when stock trading is dominated by rapid-fire computers, he relishes paper stocks for their palpability. Wall Street seems cryptic and far away, but certificates are something he can see and hold. They're a pleasant throwback, a tangible marker of company history, a wisp of inky artwork in a canyon of electronic solemnity. So when Facebook went public this year and decided not to print paper stock certificates, Kerstein was bummed.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2011 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
A federal judge made a highly anticipated ruling Friday on the question of which set of shareholders in the defunct Philadelphia Savings Fund Society should receive the $276 million awarded in damages for the improper closing of the bank in 1992. The question, raised by a former director who sold his shares at a loss in 1993, was whether the money should be paid to current shareholders - including some hedge funds that may have bought the shares for a penny a piece - or to shareholders at the time of the bank's seizure by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
Dear Harry: I think the Daily News is the best sports paper in the country. Until recently, I rarely read the rest of the paper. Since I found you, I have found other gems. My mother died last week. While cleaning out her house, my sister found two stock certificates of Transit Investment Corporation dated in 1938 and 1948. I'm sending you a photo so you can see just what's involved. The name on the certificates is my grandfather's. He worked for the old PTC as a trolley driver.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A Single Man is like a big coffee table book on grief, loneliness, and loss - and mid-20th-century home design. Set in 1962 Los Angeles and starring Colin Firth as an English literature professor (he's English and he teaches literature), this meticulously crafted film has been adapted from the Christopher Isherwood novel by fashion designer-turned-director Tom Ford. Ford gets a strong and melancholy performance out of Firth, who wears his charm like a burden, because everything in his character's life has become meaningless since the death of his lover, Jim (Matthew Goode, in flashback)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2002 | BY MIKE MCGRATH, FOR THE DAILY NEWS
ARE YOU USING Enron stock certificates to insulate your house? Worried that if your 401(k) dips any lower, you'll have to send (PICK ONE: your bank; your old company; your stockbroker) a monthly check after you retire? Have your retirement goals dropped from "Florida by 50" to "Newark at 90"? Is that what's troubling you, bunky? Well, get down off that ledge and invest in some spring bulb futures - they'll deliver great returns! You'll reap colorful interest for five full months next spring, then enjoy compound dividends for years to come.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2002 | By Wendy Tanaka INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Billions of dollars in life savings were lost in the Enron Corp. debacle - but some enterprising souls are recouping at least a little of their money. Nearly 2,000 souvenirs bearing the Enron logo, many coming from former company employees, are being auctioned on the popular eBay Web site. The objects have gained worldwide interest, and some have sold for more than $200 apiece. One current Enron employee, who sold a company paperweight on eBay, estimated a huge personal loss from the former energy-trading giant's spectacular collapse last fall.
BUSINESS
January 20, 1999 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1871, the Union & Titusville Railroad Co. of Pennsylvania issued 100 shares of stock for $50 each to investor James Fisk Jr. - for a total of $5,000. This weekend, Fisk's stock certificate, now 128 years old, could sell for $15,000 to $25,000 at an auction near Lancaster. The certificate for the railroad shares is one of many that may no longer be worth anything to an investor but is worth a lot of money to a scripophile, a collector of rare and historic stock and bond certificates.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|