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NEWS
January 23, 2013
ONE OF THE smartest things I've done with my investing is to start using stop-loss orders, saving myself a fortune. I use them when I take chances on speculative stocks, and they keep me from getting burned. And even on my solid, long-term investments, they spare me big drops and I can always buy back in later. The trick is just believing in why you bought it in the first place and not hesitating to jump back in while it's down. - Z., online   The Fool responds: Placing stop-loss orders when you buy a stock can indeed be helpful.
NEWS
October 10, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Army Spec. Garett Reppenhagen was serving as a cavalry scout and sniper in Iraq and looked forward to leaving in October 2004. Then came new orders. He'd be staying nearly 10 more months, like it or not. Reppenhagen was among tens of thousands of service members who were held over by the Pentagon's controversial "stop-loss" policy, which can mandate duty beyond enlistment periods. Congress last year approved a $500 bonus for each month of extended service, with a claims deadline of Oct. 21, 2010.
NEWS
July 21, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Army Spec. Joe Fabozzi thought he was getting out of the New Jersey National Guard in December 2003. He wound up dodging bullets and mortar shells in Iraq four months beyond his enlistment. Army Spec. Garett Reppenhagen expected to leave Iraq in October 2004. New orders kept him there nearly 10 more months. And Army Sgt. Robert Reichner hoped to leave Kosovo in June 2004 to restart his civilian life. He was sent to Guantanamo Bay for another year of duty. The three were among about 60,000 service members who have been held over during the past four years by the Pentagon's controversial "stop-loss" policy.
NEWS
October 10, 2010
To learn more about the stop-loss bonus, including submission requirements and military service links, go to
NEWS
July 25, 2008
Since the U.S. troops have been working overtime, the government should pay them overtime. Legislation introduced by Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) would compensate soldiers $1,500 per month for extended duty. It would be a well-deserved reward for enduring the Pentagon's unfair "stop-loss" policy. In the past four years, the Defense Department has extended involuntarily enlistment periods for about 60,000 service members. At present, as the war in Iraq entered its sixth year this summer, more than 12,000 soldiers - including 4,000 National Guard members - were under stop-loss orders.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
THE HOLLYWOOD-Goes-to-Iraq movie has turned into something of a box office ghetto, but "Stop-Loss" may be able to break out. It has more muscular studio backing, and an old-fashioned issue-movie sense of purpose that could serve it well - it's built around the so-called "back-door draft" that presses some Iraq-Afghanistan vets into service involuntarily. "Stop-Loss" opens in Iraq, with a short combat prologue that establishes beyond all doubt the courage and honor of its main character - Sgt. Brandon King (Ryan Phillippe)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's been nearly a decade since Kimberly Peirce made the Oscar-winning Boys Don't Cry . Her newest film, which she cowrote and directed, might well carry the same title. It is about boys, fierce and fervent, who have enlisted to fight in Iraq. They don't cry. They joke, rage, seethe, shoot, sustain injury and complete tours of duty - only to be redeployed again. Admittedly, the opening sequences of this MTV-produced film look like The Real World: Karbala . Co-opting the style of soldier-shot footage captured on digicams, cellphones and Palm Pilots, the early scenes of Stop-Loss are unpromising and inauthentic as a Parisian popster who tries to imitate Elvis.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Army is taking casualties almost daily in Iraq and Afghanistan. And a new policy - affecting units designated for overseas deployment - promises to delay some soldiers' plans to leave the service. But the Army is having no trouble finding recruits, and has been ahead of recruiting goals each month this year, officials said yesterday. About 7,477 soldiers were signed up last month for the active Army - 262 more than the targeted number; 2,399 troops were recruited for the Army Reserve - 172 more than the goal.
NEWS
June 9, 2004
THE ARMY'S recently announced "stop-loss" directive - which will extend the tours of duty in Iraq and Aghanistan of thousands of soldiers beyond the time for which they volunteered - is a terrible injustice to the individual soldiers and their families. It exacts a further sacrifice from those who already have sacrificed so much more than their fellow citizens. And it's hard not to believe that at least part of the reasons are political - that making soldiers stay makes it easier to continue to hide the true costs of the war. But it also poses a danger to national security in the not-too-distant future.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By STEVEN ZEITCHIK, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Strolling around Manhattan's Chinatown and Central Park, where he filmed scenes from his new film "Limitless," director Neil Burger is reliving his movie's arc. And his career. Which may not be all that far apart. Burger, 48, radiates a calm that comes from going through the Hollywood ringer. He's moved from anonymous commercial work, to the critically acclaimed "The Illusionist," to the box office disappointment "The Lucky Ones. " In between were numerous projects that never got off the ground.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 23, 2013
ONE OF THE smartest things I've done with my investing is to start using stop-loss orders, saving myself a fortune. I use them when I take chances on speculative stocks, and they keep me from getting burned. And even on my solid, long-term investments, they spare me big drops and I can always buy back in later. The trick is just believing in why you bought it in the first place and not hesitating to jump back in while it's down. - Z., online   The Fool responds: Placing stop-loss orders when you buy a stock can indeed be helpful.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2011 | By STEVEN ZEITCHIK, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Strolling around Manhattan's Chinatown and Central Park, where he filmed scenes from his new film "Limitless," director Neil Burger is reliving his movie's arc. And his career. Which may not be all that far apart. Burger, 48, radiates a calm that comes from going through the Hollywood ringer. He's moved from anonymous commercial work, to the critically acclaimed "The Illusionist," to the box office disappointment "The Lucky Ones. " In between were numerous projects that never got off the ground.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2011 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
He's a former Navy SEAL and looks the part, with a buzz cut, lean physique, and straight-back posture. Neil Smit, the new president of Comcast Corp.'s giant cable division, has done tours of duty with America Online, Nabisco, Charter Communications, and a private firm that negotiated for the release of kidnapped executives in South America. The 52-year-old, however, believes he learned his most important leadership lessons in his daunting and elite role in the military. In an interview last week in his 53d-floor office at the Comcast Center, he enumerated them: Build your team.
NEWS
October 10, 2010
To learn more about the stop-loss bonus, including submission requirements and military service links, go to
NEWS
October 10, 2010 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Army Spec. Garett Reppenhagen was serving as a cavalry scout and sniper in Iraq and looked forward to leaving in October 2004. Then came new orders. He'd be staying nearly 10 more months, like it or not. Reppenhagen was among tens of thousands of service members who were held over by the Pentagon's controversial "stop-loss" policy, which can mandate duty beyond enlistment periods. Congress last year approved a $500 bonus for each month of extended service, with a claims deadline of Oct. 21, 2010.
NEWS
September 13, 2008 | By Kamala Lane
When I deployed to Iraq with my National Guard unit in 2005, I found myself fascinated by the Forward Operating Bases, or FOBs, where we lived, worked and took creative measures to entertain ourselves. FOBs are unique melting pots. They house and employ a great percentage of just about every color of the racial rainbow, including Iraqi civilians. Therefore, after watching current movies and television shows - such as Stop-Loss and HBO's Generation Kill, I am quite worried that Hollywood will continue to uphold the myth of a diversity-deficient military.
NEWS
July 25, 2008
Since the U.S. troops have been working overtime, the government should pay them overtime. Legislation introduced by Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D., N.J.) would compensate soldiers $1,500 per month for extended duty. It would be a well-deserved reward for enduring the Pentagon's unfair "stop-loss" policy. In the past four years, the Defense Department has extended involuntarily enlistment periods for about 60,000 service members. At present, as the war in Iraq entered its sixth year this summer, more than 12,000 soldiers - including 4,000 National Guard members - were under stop-loss orders.
NEWS
July 21, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Army Spec. Joe Fabozzi thought he was getting out of the New Jersey National Guard in December 2003. He wound up dodging bullets and mortar shells in Iraq four months beyond his enlistment. Army Spec. Garett Reppenhagen expected to leave Iraq in October 2004. New orders kept him there nearly 10 more months. And Army Sgt. Robert Reichner hoped to leave Kosovo in June 2004 to restart his civilian life. He was sent to Guantanamo Bay for another year of duty. The three were among about 60,000 service members who have been held over during the past four years by the Pentagon's controversial "stop-loss" policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
THE HOLLYWOOD-Goes-to-Iraq movie has turned into something of a box office ghetto, but "Stop-Loss" may be able to break out. It has more muscular studio backing, and an old-fashioned issue-movie sense of purpose that could serve it well - it's built around the so-called "back-door draft" that presses some Iraq-Afghanistan vets into service involuntarily. "Stop-Loss" opens in Iraq, with a short combat prologue that establishes beyond all doubt the courage and honor of its main character - Sgt. Brandon King (Ryan Phillippe)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2008 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's been nearly a decade since Kimberly Peirce made the Oscar-winning Boys Don't Cry . Her newest film, which she cowrote and directed, might well carry the same title. It is about boys, fierce and fervent, who have enlisted to fight in Iraq. They don't cry. They joke, rage, seethe, shoot, sustain injury and complete tours of duty - only to be redeployed again. Admittedly, the opening sequences of this MTV-produced film look like The Real World: Karbala . Co-opting the style of soldier-shot footage captured on digicams, cellphones and Palm Pilots, the early scenes of Stop-Loss are unpromising and inauthentic as a Parisian popster who tries to imitate Elvis.
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