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Storm

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NEWS
December 11, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
JUST LIKE Dr. Seuss' Thing 1 and Thing 2, Philadelphia's "Storm 1 and Storm 2" - as Mayor Nutter is calling Sunday's wintry weather and today's predicted conditions - are proving rather troublesome. "The challenge here again is the ice, rain, snow and the refreezing process," Nutter said. "You get ice that binds to the asphalt even when the new snow is on top of it. You can plow the snow; it doesn't work as well with ice once it literally binds to the asphalt. That is a challenge, not only here but everywhere else.
NEWS
July 14, 1996
In the days before Bertha hit the Carolinas, forecasters and residents watched closely as the storm spun through the Caribbean. While the fading storm swept north yesterday with heavy rains, relieved officials said the East Coast had been lucky the damage was not worse.
NEWS
January 3, 1994 | Daily News photos by Andrea Mihalik
The roller-bladers at right and the lads feeding the waterfowl below enjoy yesterday's balmy weather on Kelly Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2003 | By JEROME MAIDA For the Daily News
Storm was hot long before Halle Berry. Although being portrayed by arguably the hottest actress on the planet has obviously made her more famous, Storm has been a favorite of comic fans for decades. Storm was created in 1975 by Len Wein and Dave Cockrum. Her powers included flight and the ability to control and manipulate the elements. When these powers manifested themselves, she was worshipped as a goddess in her African homeland before journeying to America to join the X-Men.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | By David Lee Preston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just 11 days after suffering massive damage from a storm that dropped no rain, the Jersey Shore was bracing today for another hit. The prediction: High winds, heavy rain, some flooding, high tides and beach erosion. And unlike the Oct. 31 storm, which caused the second-highest tide on record and at least $72 million in damage, this storm was expected to show its force inland, too. The last storm, which came from the northeast, resulted from a low- pressure system about 300 miles offshore; this low-pressure system, which comes from the south, will be much closer to land.
NEWS
September 28, 1993 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
A storm packing high winds whipped through the Philadelphia area yesterday afternoon, knocking down trees and power lines and making rush hour miserable for thousands of commuters. Lincoln and Kelly drives and many other roads were blocked for a time by downed trees, and SEPTA suspended service on three of its seven regional rail lines. The storm also knocked out power to about 120,000 Philadelphia Electric Co. customers. The storm, which hit between 3:30 and 4 p.m., brought some flooding, but most of the damage was delivered by high winds.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Dave Collins, Associated Press
HARTFORD, Conn. - Crews trying to restore power to hundreds of thousands of Northeasterners after a freak weekend snowstorm swept up the coast face a tough job, even with fair weather to work in. The wet, heavy snow that snapped branches and toppled trees across the region Saturday and Sunday brought down an extensive network of wiring, including sturdy, long-distance transmission lines and wires supplying individual homes. More than three million customers lost power at some point from Maryland to Maine, and authorities have said it could be next week before power is restored to the rest of the more than 1.7 million residents who are still in the dark.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | By Cheryl Squadrito, Special to The Inquirer
Ridley Park did not escape when Friday's storm brought devastation to Delaware County. During the storm, Ridley Lake overflowed and a family had to be evacuated from its home in the 200 block of West Ridley Avenue, Councilman John Naugle told the Borough Council at its meeting Tuesday. The house and the occupants came through unscathed, Naugle added. At the other end of town, a manhole cover at the foot of the East Hinckley Avenue bridge was swept away and there was a blockage within the Central Delaware County Authority line.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
Yesterday's wind-driven deluge interfered with communcations, made driving a nightmare, tipped over trees in the rain-softened earth and toppled power lines. But as bad as it was, it wasn't as bad as it could have been, said a National Weather Service meteorologist. By evening, 1.56 inches of rain had fallen at Philadelphia International Airport, and wind gusts of 56 mph were reported there, according to NWS. "It's not unusual to get two or three inches in coastal storms in the wintertime," said meteorlogist Ken Hagy.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | by Kevin Haney, Daily News Staff Writer
Demolition work is under way in the aftermath of Thursday's storm, which was so fierce, it brought bricks down from a church spire and caused partial collapses of at least nine other buildings, the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections said. L&I spokesman Tom McNally said the largest building to collapse was a vacant commercial four-story brick building on Paul Street near Kinsey. The building was already in poor shape. L&I records showed it had been deemed a "dangerous case" in October 1991 and was reinspected just a few weeks ago. Then, inspectors found one wall partially collapsed and other parts of the building fractured and bulging.
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NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Ben Finley and Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writers
An unseasonable winter storm bore down on the region Wednesday, scuttling scores of airline flights and snarling traffic on one of the busiest travel days of the year. During the afternoon hours, when many Thanksgiving travelers might normally climb into their cars, snow had started to blanket the northern and western suburbs, with as much as eight inches forecast for the hardest-hit areas. Police reported scores of minor car accidents. Gov. Christie declared a state of emergency in New Jersey, and by 6:30 p.m., 169 flights had been canceled and hundreds more delayed at Philadelphia International Airport.
NEWS
November 27, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you were looking for a last-minute excuse to stay home on Thanksgiving, Wednesday's forecast could be a rock-solid justification. Anywhere from one to eight inches of snow is expected to drape the Philadelphia region on the busiest travel day of the year, when AAA predicts more than 500,000 area residents will hit the roads. A nor'easter will first bring overnight wind and rain, which will be heavy at times, before dumping wet snow as soon as late Wednesday morning, the National Weather Service said.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
PLANNING TO travel today? We hereby grant you permission to kick off your shoes, crack a beer, ignore your in-laws and postpone your Thanksgiving journey until tomorrow morning. It might be safer. AAA Mid-Atlantic is predicting that about 580,000 Philadelphia-area residents will travel 50 miles or more away from home between today and Sunday - the heaviest Thanksgiving travel volume since 2007. But a coastal storm is expected to move in this morning and could create major traffic problems throughout the day. Fantastic.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
FOX 29's Iain Page and Lucy Noland , and CBS3's Kathy Orr , cooked up a storm yesterday at the Free Library of Philadelphia's central branch for Cancer Treatment Centers of America's Thanksgiving Throwdown benefit. The trio (along with local cancer survivors Andrew Slachta , Rhonda Ulmer and Laing Meyer ) whipped up meals that could be served with any good turkey dinner, including stuffing with Italian sausage, vegetarian collard greens and sweet potato casserole.
SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
TAMPA, Fla. - The arena's name seems to change every time the Flyers are in Tampa, but the results are the same. Steven Stamkos scored a pair of goals as the Flyers lost their seventh straight decision in Tampa Bay's home rink since 2011, dropping a 4-3 decision to the Lightning on Thursday night at what is now called Amalie Arena. The defeat ended the Flyers' three-game winning streak, and they will try to rebound Saturday night against the Panthers in Sunrise, Fla. Tampa Bay won the game by going 2 for 5 on the power play, while the Flyers were 0 for 2. The last power-play goal, which gave the Lightning a 4-2 lead with 3 minutes, 12 seconds left, came after a controversial too-many-men-on-the-ice penalty on Pierre-Edouard Bellemare, who thought he got off the ice in time.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MARGATE, N.J. - The old saying that calm seas never made a good sailor may apply to Salvatore Calabrese when it comes to operating his family's bay-front Blue Water Marina, which was nearly washed away by Hurricane Sandy. Two years and more than $1 million later, Calabrese has weathered the storm after the storm: a series of challenges and setbacks including spending $100,000 just to remove debris from the site and finding adequate funding to complete the rebuilding. The marina is set to fully reopen in the spring.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
The chatter that Pope Francis will visit the land of cheesesteaks and Tastykakes next year has not been officially confirmed. But members of the DiCocco family, owners of the St. Jude Shop Inc. in Havertown, Delaware County, might be in a position to know. In the 50 years since the Catholic religious store was founded, the DiCoccos have been called on to design chairs for pontiffs, arrange a gift from a president to a pope, and help design the interiors of cathedrals. But as far as Francis' visiting Philadelphia for the World Meeting of Families, the DiCoccos aren't talking.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Point Drive at the tip of Longport, where houses were cracked open two years ago by Hurricane Sandy's waves and wind, their multimillion-dollar vulnerability bared to the sea, all is as it was. The Hankins finished a total rebuild. The Tuchmans debated selling, but decided to do the repairs and keep their summer home after all. Marvin Ashner, who never left, not even during the storm, still answers his door beneath whimsical Blues Brothers statues. "Everybody's back," said Steven Hankin, an Atlantic City lawyer who lives on Point Drive, which overlooks the inlet's washing machine currents.
SPORTS
October 25, 2014 | By Jeff McLane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeff Stoutland has a name he uses to describe the naysayers of the world. There were quite a few members of this so-called fraternity who predicted doom when the Eagles offensive line lost one starter after another and inexperienced backups were pushed to the fore. "I don't live in a world of the 'Fellowship of the Miserable,' " the Eagles' offensive line coach said Thursday. "I never think that way. I'm always thinking that this group is going to be a solid group. We're going to work our butts off to get them ready to play, and they'll be ready if they're called upon.
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