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Storm Surge

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REAL_ESTATE
June 27, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
When we lived in Mount Airy, I once joked that in the event all the glaciers melted, we'd have beachfront property. Since my efforts to be the Henny Youngman of climate change, we've had some serious weather: Hurricane Sandy in 2012, which followed Irene in 2011. The greatest damage in New Jersey and New York was caused by storm surge - especially in New York City, even with precautions taken after the extensive flooding caused by Hurricane Irene. A report by financial-services company CoreLogic outlines the potential risk of damage from hurricane storm-surge inundation on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
MIDDLE TOWNSHIP, N.J. - Before the storm was over, a line of cars had begun to form along the road to Reeds Beach. Stepping out of their cars Tuesday morning, families peered across the marshland to the thin spit of sand that stretches out into the Delaware Bay. Some could see their homes and were relieved; others already had received bad news. "What is there to talk about?" said John "Bucky" Stapleford, 56, who just found out that his grandmother's home, which had been in the family about 70 years, had washed into the ocean.
NEWS
September 1, 2005
SEEING events in New Orleans unfold, what is in place in our area that would help if a Category 3 or higher hurricane were to hit the Jersey shore? It has been at least 40 years since we had a major hurricane. This is an alarming prospect. Many communities are built up, and there's a lack of information posted for evacuation and help. A storm surge of 25 feet would most likely affect the few roads available to evacuate New Jersey's barrier islands. Information should be readily available to the public, especially during vacation season.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | By Seth Borenstein, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Although they have long been feared as coastal killers, hurricanes have killed far more Americans inland than along shorelines since 1970, according to a study released yesterday. Of the 600 U.S. hurricane fatalities since then, 59 percent of the victims drowned inland in fresh water, often in their cars, according to Ed Rappaport, deputy director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami. His analysis appears in the September issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.
NEWS
September 7, 2005 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it slammed ashore Aug. 29, Hurricane Katrina generated what might have been a record storm surge - with water levels higher than a two-story building and storm waves cresting more than 50 feet above sea level. "The whole scale of this thing is just staggering," Asbury H. Sallenger, an oceanographer with the U.S. Geological Survey's Center for Coastal and Watershed Studies in St. Petersburg, Fla., said yesterday. "It is horrible," said Stephen Baig, a surge specialist with the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
A NEW SCIENTIFIC study says the chance of flooding that's bad enough to have once been dubbed a "once-a-century" event has more than doubled along the New Jersey coast and elsewhere. And by 2030, many coastal areas, including 22 New Jersey municipalities, could regularly see coastal flooding of historic proportions as a rise in sea level and storm surge combine to raise waters four feet above the local high-tide line. In short, the report from the nonprofit Climate Central in Princeton titled Surging Seas blames global warming.
NEWS
July 31, 2006 | By Richard L. Ca┬Łas and Joseph R. Fuentes
What would happen if New Jersey took a direct hit from a Category 3 hurricane? The storm surge would severely damage Shore communities. Areas prone to flooding during much smaller storms would be inundated. In inland areas, heavy wind and rain could leave entire communities without electricity or passable roads. Anyone stranded may be left without food or water for up to three days, until emergency responders can reach them. These things could happen in New Jersey. As Tropical Storm Beryl reminded us and meteorologists predict, this could be a summer of increased tropical storm and hurricane activity.
NEWS
September 5, 2012 | By Cain Burdeau and Stacey Plaisance, Associated Press
LAPLACE, La. - At the urging of residents who have long felt forgotten in the shadow of more densely populated New Orleans, the Army Corps of Engineers says it will look into whether the city's fortified defenses pushed floodwaters provoked by Hurricane Isaac into outlying areas. However, the Corps has said it is unlikely scientific analysis will confirm that theory, suggested not only by locals, but by some of the state's most powerful politicians. Instead, weather experts say a unique set of circumstances about the storm - not the floodwalls surrounding the New Orleans metro area - had more to do with flooding neighborhoods that in recent years have never been under water because of storm surge.
NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie said Thursday that he had requested federal aid to help New Jersey respond to the storm that brought flooding and record snowfall late last month. In a statement, Christie said he had requested aid for 17 of New Jersey's 21 counties, including Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, and Cumberland. The storm was particularly damaging in Cape May County Shore towns. "I have determined that this incident is of such severity and magnitude that an effective response is beyond the capabilities of the state and the affected county and local governments, and that federal assistance is necessary to supplement the efforts and available resources of state, county, and local governments and disaster relief organizations," Christie said.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
BELMAR, N.J. - As Jersey Shore towns spend millions of dollars to rebuild boardwalks wrecked by Sandy, some are opting for an additional layer of protection in the form of steel seawalls placed between the boards and the shoreline. The idea is to protect the boardwalks - and the homes and businesses nearby - from the destructive power of storm surges. "It has to be an engineered seawall-and-dune system that will protect the boardwalk and mitigate against the storm surge going into the neighborhood," Belmar Mayor Matthew Doherty said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
June 27, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
When we lived in Mount Airy, I once joked that in the event all the glaciers melted, we'd have beachfront property. Since my efforts to be the Henny Youngman of climate change, we've had some serious weather: Hurricane Sandy in 2012, which followed Irene in 2011. The greatest damage in New Jersey and New York was caused by storm surge - especially in New York City, even with precautions taken after the extensive flooding caused by Hurricane Irene. A report by financial-services company CoreLogic outlines the potential risk of damage from hurricane storm-surge inundation on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts.
NEWS
February 13, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie said Thursday that he had requested federal aid to help New Jersey respond to the storm that brought flooding and record snowfall late last month. In a statement, Christie said he had requested aid for 17 of New Jersey's 21 counties, including Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, and Cumberland. The storm was particularly damaging in Cape May County Shore towns. "I have determined that this incident is of such severity and magnitude that an effective response is beyond the capabilities of the state and the affected county and local governments, and that federal assistance is necessary to supplement the efforts and available resources of state, county, and local governments and disaster relief organizations," Christie said.
NEWS
August 15, 2013
Could anything make New Jersey's treacly "Stronger than the Storm" ads more irritating? Surprisingly, the answer is yes: finding out we paid extra for them. The Asbury Park Press reported recently that MWW, the politically industrious public relations firm that created the post-Sandy Shore tourism campaign, was hired at a premium. While a competing firm, the Sigma Group, offered to do the job for $2.5 million, Christie administration officials decided to hire MWW for $4.7 million in federal relief funds.
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Jennifer Kay, Associated Press
MIAMI - The first named storm of the Atlantic season hammered Florida with rain, heavy winds, and tornadoes Thursday as it moved over land toward the coast of Georgia and the Carolinas, promising sloppy commutes and waterlogged vacations through the beginning of the weekend. Tropical Storm Andrea was not expected to strengthen into a hurricane but forecasters warned it could spawn tornadoes and cause isolated flooding and storm surge before it loses steam over the next two days. Tropical storm warnings were in effect for a large section of Florida's west coast from Boca Grande to the Steinhatchee River and for the East Coast from Flagler Beach, Fla., all the way to Cape Charles Light in Virginia, and the lower Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort.
TRAVEL
May 26, 2013 | By Jake Pearson, Associated Press
NEW YORK - At the beginning of each tourist season, the entrepreneurs who pitch the thrill rides, hot dogs, sideshows, and souvenirs at gritty Coney Island gather along its famous boardwalk to pray for two things: good weather and large crowds. Never have they prayed harder than now. Five months after Sandy's storm surge swamped New York City's most storied beach destination, many businesses are pinning their hopes on a strong season to help them make up for the hundreds of thousands of dollars they have spent to get back up and running.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Seth Borenstein, Associated Press
Federal weather forecasts for Hurricane Sandy were exceptionally accurate last fall, but the warnings themselves were confusing, an internal review has found. The gigantic October storm lost tropical characteristics hours before landfall in New Jersey, so the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration stopped calling it a hurricane. Instead it shifted its focus to flooding and high-wind warnings, and moved responsibility from the National Hurricane Center in Miami to local weather offices.
NEWS
February 22, 2013 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public Service Electric & Gas Co. wants to spend $3.9 billion over the next decade to protect its network against Atlantic storms, which government scientists predict will grow in intensity, the company announced Wednesday. The utility's plans, subject to approval by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, come just months after Hurricane Sandy swept through the New Jersey coastline and wiped out power to more than 2.5 million people. "It's clear that Sandy, Hurricane Irene, and the October ice storm represent extreme weather patterns that have become commonplace," said Ralph Izzo, chief executive officer and chairman of the utility's parent, Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. "Reliability is no longer enough.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2013 | By James Osborne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Public Service Electric & Gas Co. wants to spend $3.9 billion over the next decade to protect its network against Atlantic storms, which government scientists predict will grow in intensity, the company announced Wednesday. The utility's plans, subject to approval by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities, come just months after Hurricane Sandy swept through the New Jersey coastline and wiped out power to more than 2.5 million people. "It's clear that Sandy, Hurricane Irene, and the October ice storm represent extreme weather patterns that have become commonplace," said Ralph Izzo, chief executive officer and chairman of the utility's parent, Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. "Reliability is no longer enough.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Did global warming and rising sea levels trigger Hurricane Sandy? And does it matter? Gov. Christie says it doesn't. Whether environmental changes caused the storm is an "esoteric question," he said at a news conference at the Shore earlier this month. Victims of the storm don't "give a damn" either - as confirmed by a group of Sandy survivors who applauded Christie's remark. But scientists say they all need to start caring. Because regardless of what caused Sandy, even those skeptical about climate change say a Sandy-like storm will happen again.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By James Osborne, Inquirer Staff Writer
ORTLEY BEACH, N.J. - A thick fog hung over the island in the late morning, forcing motorists coming across the causeway from the mainland to drop their speed and hope there was no hazard hidden in the opaque mist. And then, as they came into Ortley Beach, the visibility cleared enough so they could see the piles of rubble and furniture still lining the town's main drag and the missing street signs replaced with spray-painted plywood denoting Fort Avenue or Third Street. And if they looked east toward the Atlantic Ocean, there was only emptiness.
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