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Storm Track

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NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Brian K. Sullivan, Bloomberg News
Hurricane Ernesto strengthened as it bore down on southeastern Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, where it was expected to move ashore late Tuesday and then move into the Bay of Campeche, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. Ernesto, the second hurricane of the Atlantic season, had top winds of 80 miles per hour, up from 65 m.p.h. earlier, and was about 140 miles east of Chetumal, Mexico, moving west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. "Ernesto has now become a well-organized tropical cyclone," the Miami-based agency said.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
FRIDAY AFTERNOON UPDATE: Snow: More and more, looking like less and less . Don't put those snow shovels away yet, especially in South Jersey and Delaware. "In the Philly area, it looks like a possible one to two inches, more amounts as you go south," said meteorologist Al Cope of the National Weather Service. Up to five inches might fall in some spots in the region, according to an analysis posted online this morning. The forecast, though, is still iffy, depending on the track of storm coming out of the Southwest, Cope said.
NEWS
March 10, 2003 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saturday nights belonged to Perry Mason on the small screen. On the radio, everybody wanted to know who wrote the "Book of Love," while Danny and the Juniors and Lee Andrews were hotter than all those glowing amber tubes. And Marshal Matt Dillon was keeping Dodge City - and the rest of us - safe from bad guys. That's the way it was back in the winter of 1957-58, when just about everything was different from today. Except the weather. In fact, the weather this winter has been uncannily similar to that of 45 years ago. If you're looking for the snows of yesteryear, here they are. And in terms of winter, some experts believe we might be heading back to the future.
NEWS
March 30, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A month after setting new standards for whiteness, the region is setting new ones for wetness. With yesterday's rains, this became the wettest 12-month period in Philadelphia since record-keeping began in 1873, and February and March almost certainly will become the wettest such two-month period, with well over a foot of precipitation. "The farmers would say, 'We know,' " said Andrew Frankenfeld, an educator at Penn State's Montgomery County agricultural extension service.
NEWS
February 7, 2008 | By Jonathan Matisse and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Villanova University's baseball players traditionally taunt nature by practicing outdoors in the first week in February, the very heart of the region's winter-misery season. But this week something extraordinary occurred on the Main Line: They got to practice in actual baseball weather. Officially, the Philadelphia temperature reached 68, smashing one of the region's longest-standing daily temperature records, one that dated to 1884 and had withstood 123 years of assaults by February mild spells.
NEWS
January 2, 2005 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Talk about turning up the heat. While the region reveled in record-breaking temperatures yesterday, Pottstown added a high degree of, well, extremely high degrees to its holiday celebration. At the borough's third annual New Year's Day bonfire at Riverfront Park, a mix of dried branches and wooden pallets burned so fast and furious that no one in the crowd of about 200 needed to be told to keep a distance. "I stepped back right away," said Sue Krause, whose husband, Bill, is a member of the Phillies Fire Co., which supervised the blaze.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those still suffering burnout from all those excessive-heat warnings might find the following a refreshing change. Deep in the heart of August, Accu-Weather Inc. is calling for a snowy winter along the I-95 corridor and throughout the Mid-Atlantic. "The I-95 cities could get hit pretty good," said meteorologist Paul Pastelok. The company sees above normal snowfall in the populations centers from Washington to Boston, places where people still might be digging out from this summer's air-conditioning bills.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The greatly anticipated January thaw finally arrived yesterday, generating the promised rivulets of snow and ice melt and exposing pavement not seen in some time. Unfortunately, the greatly anticipated January thaw was also coming to an end last night. If you liked yesterday's weather, the probability that you'll dislike the rest of the week's weather is roughly 100 percent. Although forecasters disagree on the details, they agree that the weather is about to deteriorate.
NEWS
December 6, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Heading into winter, the region's highway departments might have enough salt and brine on hand to liquefy the Hubbard Glacier in Alaska. And based on the latest winter outlooks, they might need it. Those who issue long-range forecasts readily acknowledge that they skate on thin scientific ice, that nailing tomorrow's weather is hard enough. But the consensus is that this weekend's wintry turn is a trailer for what's to come, that the brisk storm traffic will continue. "This is the first of what's going to be a series," said Henry Margusity, a meteorologist with Accu-Weather Inc. "This weather pattern is just amazing.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey farmers have faced a summer of extremes - the wettest June and the warmest July nights since recordkeeping began in in the state 1895. The combination of heavy rainfall and high temperatures over the last couple of months has put a dent in crop production. It delayed some farmers' use of equipment in water-logged fields to plant and harvest, and prompted them to treat crops for fungus and disease problems. Many others, though, were hit less hard by torrential downpours and are having a good season, with slightly higher prices resulting from the lower supply of produce.
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NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey farmers have faced a summer of extremes - the wettest June and the warmest July nights since recordkeeping began in in the state 1895. The combination of heavy rainfall and high temperatures over the last couple of months has put a dent in crop production. It delayed some farmers' use of equipment in water-logged fields to plant and harvest, and prompted them to treat crops for fungus and disease problems. Many others, though, were hit less hard by torrential downpours and are having a good season, with slightly higher prices resulting from the lower supply of produce.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those still suffering burnout from all those excessive-heat warnings might find the following a refreshing change. Deep in the heart of August, Accu-Weather Inc. is calling for a snowy winter along the I-95 corridor and throughout the Mid-Atlantic. "The I-95 cities could get hit pretty good," said meteorologist Paul Pastelok. The company sees above normal snowfall in the populations centers from Washington to Boston, places where people still might be digging out from this summer's air-conditioning bills.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Brian K. Sullivan, Bloomberg News
Hurricane Ernesto strengthened as it bore down on southeastern Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, where it was expected to move ashore late Tuesday and then move into the Bay of Campeche, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. Ernesto, the second hurricane of the Atlantic season, had top winds of 80 miles per hour, up from 65 m.p.h. earlier, and was about 140 miles east of Chetumal, Mexico, moving west-northwest at 15 m.p.h. "Ernesto has now become a well-organized tropical cyclone," the Miami-based agency said.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
FRIDAY AFTERNOON UPDATE: Snow: More and more, looking like less and less . Don't put those snow shovels away yet, especially in South Jersey and Delaware. "In the Philly area, it looks like a possible one to two inches, more amounts as you go south," said meteorologist Al Cope of the National Weather Service. Up to five inches might fall in some spots in the region, according to an analysis posted online this morning. The forecast, though, is still iffy, depending on the track of storm coming out of the Southwest, Cope said.
NEWS
January 9, 2011 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
After the coldest December in a decade, you may be wondering what happened to the warm-up promised in those preseason forecasts. So are some of the weather folks. Now meteorologists are saying it looks as if the cold will persist deep into the month here and in much of the nation, perhaps lapping into February. Major East Coast snow is possible this week, with potentially frigid conditions next week. Accu-Weather Inc. in State College, Pa., is saying that nationwide this could be the coldest January in 25 years.
NEWS
March 30, 2010 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A month after setting new standards for whiteness, the region is setting new ones for wetness. With yesterday's rains, this became the wettest 12-month period in Philadelphia since record-keeping began in 1873, and February and March almost certainly will become the wettest such two-month period, with well over a foot of precipitation. "The farmers would say, 'We know,' " said Andrew Frankenfeld, an educator at Penn State's Montgomery County agricultural extension service.
NEWS
December 6, 2009 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Heading into winter, the region's highway departments might have enough salt and brine on hand to liquefy the Hubbard Glacier in Alaska. And based on the latest winter outlooks, they might need it. Those who issue long-range forecasts readily acknowledge that they skate on thin scientific ice, that nailing tomorrow's weather is hard enough. But the consensus is that this weekend's wintry turn is a trailer for what's to come, that the brisk storm traffic will continue. "This is the first of what's going to be a series," said Henry Margusity, a meteorologist with Accu-Weather Inc. "This weather pattern is just amazing.
NEWS
February 7, 2008 | By Jonathan Matisse and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Villanova University's baseball players traditionally taunt nature by practicing outdoors in the first week in February, the very heart of the region's winter-misery season. But this week something extraordinary occurred on the Main Line: They got to practice in actual baseball weather. Officially, the Philadelphia temperature reached 68, smashing one of the region's longest-standing daily temperature records, one that dated to 1884 and had withstood 123 years of assaults by February mild spells.
NEWS
January 2, 2005 | By Kathleen Brady Shea and Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Talk about turning up the heat. While the region reveled in record-breaking temperatures yesterday, Pottstown added a high degree of, well, extremely high degrees to its holiday celebration. At the borough's third annual New Year's Day bonfire at Riverfront Park, a mix of dried branches and wooden pallets burned so fast and furious that no one in the crowd of about 200 needed to be told to keep a distance. "I stepped back right away," said Sue Krause, whose husband, Bill, is a member of the Phillies Fire Co., which supervised the blaze.
NEWS
March 10, 2003 | By Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saturday nights belonged to Perry Mason on the small screen. On the radio, everybody wanted to know who wrote the "Book of Love," while Danny and the Juniors and Lee Andrews were hotter than all those glowing amber tubes. And Marshal Matt Dillon was keeping Dodge City - and the rest of us - safe from bad guys. That's the way it was back in the winter of 1957-58, when just about everything was different from today. Except the weather. In fact, the weather this winter has been uncannily similar to that of 45 years ago. If you're looking for the snows of yesteryear, here they are. And in terms of winter, some experts believe we might be heading back to the future.
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