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Storm

NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, Maureen Ehret, a married mother of three who lives on quiet Byron Lane in Lower Makefield, felt like going out and grabbing a cup of coffee. Her Acura MDX was parked just in front of her garage. As she raised the garage door, she noticed that snow was coming down in heavy clumps. "That wasn't right," she thought. It had stopped snowing long ago and was now mostly raining. She paused. It was a pause that saved her life. The snow that was raining down came from the upper branches of an old tulip poplar tree.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY DIANA DAVID, Daily News Staff Writer davidd@phillynews.com, 215-568-5914
JUST AS PHILADELPHIA was recovering from Monday's winter storm, the region was slammed with a devastating icy mix overnight Tuesday into yesterday. The storm caused power outages affecting more than 623,000 PECO Energy customers in southeastern Pennsylvania, the utility's second-biggest failure on record. More than 1,000 PECO utility-crew members were put to work trying to restore power. It could be days before all power is restored, officials said. Shortly after 9 p.m., Gov. Corbett declared a state of emergency in Pennsylvania to help authorities deal with the weather.
NEWS
February 7, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
A NARBERTH physician was in critical condition last night after he was struck by a tree limb while helping a neighbor, a Montgomery County spokesman said. The man, identified by several neighbors as Dr. Russell Karten, was helping to clear debris from a driveway on Shirley Road in Narberth about 8:30 a.m. when the limb fell and struck him in the head. Karten was taken to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where he was listed in critical condition last night. He is an emergency physician for the Main Line Health network, including Lankenau Medical Center.
NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By Amelia Brust, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIAWhat a cruel tease Sunday was, a springlike, downright balmy day - relatively speaking for this freeze-fest of a winter. The temperature reached 52 degrees, melting snow in Philadelphia's Franklin Square park, where the carousel and other facilities remained in winter lockdown, but where signs of weather relief were all around - from melting snow and muddy ground to Julie Chhin and Vicki Sinn taking turns strumming a guitar. "It's a great day," said Chhin, who, like Sinn, attends Philadelphia High School for Girls.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Move over, Philly. Brookhaven said it rocked this storm. According to the unofficial total called into the National Weather Service in Mount Holly by a Brookhaven observer, the Delaware County borough received 14.8 inches of snow - 1.3 more inches than the official Philadelphia total of 13.5 at the airport. That made the city's top-10 list for one-day storm totals. On Wednesday, Brookhaven residents were feeling the pride of being No. 1 - by their measurement - in the region for snowfall.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not long after the first gentle flakes appeared like so many white fireflies Tuesday morning, the storm all but erupted, shutting down Philadelphia and dooming a 53-year-old record. Suddenly, buildings, cars, and human beings were obscured behind dense white veils of dendrites - those snowflakes whose elegant design is so favored by holiday decorators and connoisseurs of accumulating snow. The attack of the dendrites - dumping snow at rates of two inches or more an hour, according to the National Weather Service - was the result of what meteorologists call "banding," in which a geographically narrow area gets caught under an ideal "snow growth" region.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Bob Warner, and Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writers
Dangerous cold gripped the region Wednesday as Philadelphia and neighboring counties dug their way out of the remnants of a record winter storm, and officials said the harsh weather played a part in three deaths. Little relief is in sight. Subfreezing temperatures are expected to continue into next week, with only a brief respite Saturday. A wintry pattern could persist for the next two to three weeks, the National Weather Service said. A touch of snow is possible Thursday and Saturday, and perhaps something more substantial early next week, forecasters said.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Anthony R. Wood, and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
After being hammered by a snowstorm that triggered an early and messy afternoon commute Tuesday, the region was preparing for a slow recovery hampered by bitter cold. "A combination of snow and plummeting temperatures and high winds makes this a dangerous storm," Mayor Nutter told reporters as the city activated its Emergency Operations Center. In New Jersey, Gov. Christie, in one of the first acts of his second term, also declared a state of emergency and asked people to stay off the roads "so our first responders and public safety officials can safely respond to any emergency.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA In a sweeping endorsement of Philadelphia's storm water plan, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded $4 million Tuesday to four area colleges to study the plan. Approved 21/2 years ago, the $1.6 billion, 20-year project aims to stem the polluted water gushing from sewer overflows during heavy rains by incorporating "green" projects throughout the city. They range from vegetated roofs and rain gardens that soak up rainwater to porous pavements that let it percolate through.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
MANAHAWKIN, N.J. - A public appearance Thursday - Gov. Christie's first outside Trenton since the George Washington Bridge scandal erupted this month - provided little more than a morale boost. And while it was meant as a lift for the sagging spirits of residents in this section of Ocean County ravaged by Hurricane Sandy 15 months ago, it was an opportunity for Christie to try to move the discourse away from the bridge and back to the beach. It was after the storm ripped New Jersey's 127-mile coastline on Oct. 29, 2012, that Christie's approval rating in the state jumped from around 56 percent to an unheard-of 77 percent, according to one poll.
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