CollectionsStrathmere
IN THE NEWS

Strathmere

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY ROBERT STRAUSS, For the Daily News
THERE IS no more enthusiastic mayor around than Len Desiderio, Sea Isle's capo for the last 20 years. Desiderio makes Ed Rendell look like Rip Van Winkle. When spirits were at their worst in town after Sandy, he organized what he has called the world's longest ribbon-cutting, opening the ocean during Presidents' Day weekend with a ribbon the length of the Sea Isle Promenade, about two miles, with hundreds of people holding it up. "I don't mind saying, we are the best place for a family to come," said Desiderio.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the little barrier island town of Strathmere, the beach and boat ramp are free, and so is the parking. What this quirky and easygoing Cape May County community - think Mayberry with a splash of Margaritaville - dearly wants to be free of, however, is Upper Township. A New Jersey appellate court panel dealt yet another defeat Wednesday to supporters of the grassroots "de-annexation" effort launched in 2007. The judges affirmed previous rulings that losing Strathmere - and its $393 million in taxable real estate - would hurt Upper Township, fiscally and otherwise.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
As his wife, Pat, watched anxiously, Jack Monaghan climbed the slatted dune fence that once separated their Strathmere home from a state park, and pointed down at the crashing sea. "There used to be a beach out there," he said last week. Now, exposed black boulders and a slender, 10-foot cliff are about all that remain of Corson's Inlet State Park's southern shoreline. In just a month, the Monaghans and state officials say, ocean waves have carried away most of the 98 acres of sand dunes where park visitors strolled or fished or beached their boats, and where endangered piping plovers, black skimmers, and least terns scampered and nested.
NEWS
October 8, 2007 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This is a place like no other at the Jersey Shore. Its appeal may be that it's just like everywhere else used to be. It's a place that still has a collection of ramshackle summer cottages without screens in the windows, the kind of little places where the whole house seems to inhale and exhale when the ocean breezes blow the curtains in, and then back out again. About a mile-and-a-half long and two blocks wide, nestled on the same barrier island as Sea Isle City and across an inlet bridge from the southern tip of Ocean City, this is a town where the asphalt paving runs only so far down the street leading to the ocean before the sand and the beach grass take over.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Augusta Eggie, 89, has found herself cut off from the mainland for days at a time when nor'easters and hurricanes have pushed the ocean up against her tiny cottage and closed the only road leading out of this narrow, barrier island community. When the water rises here - and that has happened with unusual frequency during the last couple of years - there are no shopping centers to head for, no boardwalks or arcades that can serve as temporary digs and little beach sand to stand in the way of the waves.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - As the school year comes to an end and the Jersey Shore's summer season begins, beachgoers traveling between Sea Isle City and Avalon won't be able to use the Townsends Inlet Bridge for at least 10 more days. With the bridge under repair, drivers must take the Garden State Parkway - which can add about 10 miles each way - to get back and forth from the neighboring Shore towns. Construction on the bridge - which began in January - was expected to be finished by Memorial Day. But Mugrose Construction Inc. now hopes to have the bridge open by June 19, said Cape May County engineer Dale Foster.
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
AVALON, N.J. - Residents of Avalon and visitors to the borough should expect to begin hearing the sounds of dredging early next month as a $6.3 million beach-replenishment project gets underway. The work on the borough's north-end beaches is expected to be completed by the Fourth of July, and it will cost far less than initially anticipated, officials said. Under the contract Avalon Borough Council unanimously awarded last week to Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co. L.L.C. of Oak Brook, Ill., 700,000 cubic yards of sand will be pumped from Eighth Street south to 26th Street, according to Mayor Martin Pagliughi.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a three-day nor'easter in September scoured away all the sand in front of his beachfront Strathmere home, Jack Monaghan beseeched the state to build a jetty - quickly - at the mouth of Corson's Inlet. New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection urged him to be patient. The Army Corps of Engineers was about to launch four massive beach-replenishment projects along New Jersey's barrier islands, the DEP told him, and new sand would be pouring out of pipes onto Corson's Inlet by December.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1986 | By Lisa DePaulo, Special to The Inquirer
It's not over yet. You've still got a good solid month to work on your tan, hear the sounds of sea gulls, feel the ocean breeze - and get sand kicked in your face at the Jersey shore. So why blow it? It's time to turn off the VCRs, get out of the casinos and strobe-lit nightclubs, and do the one thing you can't do come fall - eat, drink and play outside. In this, our official guide to end-of-summer hot spots, the places mentioned have only two things in common: They're all fun, and they're all outdoors.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - A beach-replenishment project on a 2.6-mile stretch along the south end of this popular vacation resort, originally scheduled to take all summer to complete, will likely be finished by midseason, according to officials. And the idea that the huge, noisy machines and pipes gushing sandy slurry will be gone from the shoreline by early July is making a lot of locals and visitors in this Cape May County beach town very happy. The process involves closing off the beach in two-block-long sections as the dredge and other equipment pumps the 1.6 million cubic yards of sand that will be pulled from an underwater borrow site about a mile offshore.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEA ISLE CITY, N.J. - As the school year comes to an end and the Jersey Shore's summer season begins, beachgoers traveling between Sea Isle City and Avalon won't be able to use the Townsends Inlet Bridge for at least 10 more days. With the bridge under repair, drivers must take the Garden State Parkway - which can add about 10 miles each way - to get back and forth from the neighboring Shore towns. Construction on the bridge - which began in January - was expected to be finished by Memorial Day. But Mugrose Construction Inc. now hopes to have the bridge open by June 19, said Cape May County engineer Dale Foster.
NEWS
April 14, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
AVALON, N.J. - Residents of Avalon and visitors to the borough should expect to begin hearing the sounds of dredging early next month as a $6.3 million beach-replenishment project gets underway. The work on the borough's north-end beaches is expected to be completed by the Fourth of July, and it will cost far less than initially anticipated, officials said. Under the contract Avalon Borough Council unanimously awarded last week to Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Co. L.L.C. of Oak Brook, Ill., 700,000 cubic yards of sand will be pumped from Eighth Street south to 26th Street, according to Mayor Martin Pagliughi.
NEWS
April 6, 2015 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - A beach-replenishment project on a 2.6-mile stretch along the south end of this popular vacation resort, originally scheduled to take all summer to complete, will likely be finished by midseason, according to officials. And the idea that the huge, noisy machines and pipes gushing sandy slurry will be gone from the shoreline by early July is making a lot of locals and visitors in this Cape May County beach town very happy. The process involves closing off the beach in two-block-long sections as the dredge and other equipment pumps the 1.6 million cubic yards of sand that will be pulled from an underwater borrow site about a mile offshore.
NEWS
January 19, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a three-day nor'easter in September scoured away all the sand in front of his beachfront Strathmere home, Jack Monaghan beseeched the state to build a jetty - quickly - at the mouth of Corson's Inlet. New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection urged him to be patient. The Army Corps of Engineers was about to launch four massive beach-replenishment projects along New Jersey's barrier islands, the DEP told him, and new sand would be pouring out of pipes onto Corson's Inlet by December.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
As his wife, Pat, watched anxiously, Jack Monaghan climbed the slatted dune fence that once separated their Strathmere home from a state park, and pointed down at the crashing sea. "There used to be a beach out there," he said last week. Now, exposed black boulders and a slender, 10-foot cliff are about all that remain of Corson's Inlet State Park's southern shoreline. In just a month, the Monaghans and state officials say, ocean waves have carried away most of the 98 acres of sand dunes where park visitors strolled or fished or beached their boats, and where endangered piping plovers, black skimmers, and least terns scampered and nested.
NEWS
December 23, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
WHEN SHE WAS admitted to Immaculate Mary Home two weeks ago, Betty Tyre cried in despair to Deacon Steve Guckin, a member of the pastoral care team. Tyre had been hospitalized so often in 2013, she'd barely slept in her own bed. Rheumatoid arthritis had crippled her so badly, she was in a wheelchair and needed rehab at Immaculate Mary, a Catholic nursing home in Mayfair, before she could return home to Port Richmond. "I feel like I'll never get better," Tyre, 69, told Guckin.
SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Jen A. Miller
For runners across the country, it's half- and full-marathon training season. Here in the Philadelphia area, it's also Jersey Shore season, which means we're tossing running shoes and shorts into our duffle bags along with flip-flops and bathing suits. You have a few different running options when you're on a Jersey Shore vacation. Here are the pros and cons of each. Something to keep in mind for all three: The Shore doesn't offer a lot of shade, so make sure to wear sunblock and/or a hat, or get out before or after the sun brings out the sunbathers.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY ROBERT STRAUSS, For the Daily News
THERE IS no more enthusiastic mayor around than Len Desiderio, Sea Isle's capo for the last 20 years. Desiderio makes Ed Rendell look like Rip Van Winkle. When spirits were at their worst in town after Sandy, he organized what he has called the world's longest ribbon-cutting, opening the ocean during Presidents' Day weekend with a ribbon the length of the Sea Isle Promenade, about two miles, with hundreds of people holding it up. "I don't mind saying, we are the best place for a family to come," said Desiderio.
NEWS
August 6, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
In the little barrier island town of Strathmere, the beach and boat ramp are free, and so is the parking. What this quirky and easygoing Cape May County community - think Mayberry with a splash of Margaritaville - dearly wants to be free of, however, is Upper Township. A New Jersey appellate court panel dealt yet another defeat Wednesday to supporters of the grassroots "de-annexation" effort launched in 2007. The judges affirmed previous rulings that losing Strathmere - and its $393 million in taxable real estate - would hurt Upper Township, fiscally and otherwise.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
DENNIS TOWNSHIP, N.J. - As a third-generation farmer who can trace his genealogical roots to the 1600s, Dave Van Vorst has had an almost innate sense of the loamy soil and salt-tinged air that make the skinny peninsula of Cape May County a unique growing region. And over the years the 67-year-old farmer had certainly grown plenty of crops - corn, lima beans, hay - on his nearby Petersburg property. But it was the fickle beach plum that helped him discover his true connection to the land.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|