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Stray Cats

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NEWS
July 15, 1990 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty, Special to The Inquirer
A group of cat owners in Lansdowne has come up with a plan that may save their pets from premature death at the SPCA. The group has made an agreement with two veterinarians to have any cats rounded up by the animal-control officer taken to either of the vets' offices for a 72-hour holding period. In that way, cat owners would have a chance to retrieve their pets before they were taken to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Overcrowding limits the society's ability to hold cats for guaranteed periods of time, and unidentified cats are either put up for adoption or put to sleep to make way for incoming cats.
NEWS
July 22, 1987 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
Stray cats strutting on Manor Avenue and 20 or so felines roaming Ridgeway Avenue have caught the Oaklyn Borough Council catnapping. But for the 30 or so residents who attended last night's special meeting, the cat problem, which they said was about three years old, is unbearable. "The Manor Avenue strays are so wild, they spit at you if you come near them," a resident said. Meanwhile, the Ridgeway Avenue Roamers, as some of the felines have been dubbed, defecate everywhere, including in the children's sandbox of one resident.
NEWS
October 4, 2003 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The Pennsylvania Game Commission usually is embroiled in disputes such as deer-season restrictions or turkey-hunting attire. Now it is taking heat for trying to regulate a different kind of wildlife: feral cats. The commission is scheduled to vote Tuesday on a proposal to outlaw the release of feral cats that are trapped and neutered, in a program widely praised for reducing the stray-cat population. The move, which the commission says is needed to curtail the spread of diseases and protect birds, has touched off a contretemps between feline fanciers and bird lovers.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Little was accomplished at a recent corporate board meeting due to the fact that key officers were all out chasing cats. That's the way it goes at Save-A-Cat Inc.: homeless cats come first. Think homeless people have it tough? Consider the plight of homeless cats: about 25,000 unadoptable cats are put to death by the city's humane societies every year. Several thousand cats end up as lab experiments. Sadistic people have hanged cats, set them on fire or used them to train fighting dogs in the art of killing.
NEWS
September 16, 1999 | By David Cho, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The township animal warden said yesterday that he had rounded up three stray kittens believed to have rabies in the Birchfield section of town. Warden Rick Bailey said he still had to find the mother cat and possibly one other kitten. The three kittens have been quarantined and were under observation for rabies symptoms. Bailey said he had searched for about 40 hours since Monday, spending much of that time in the woods, on streets, and in other cat hangouts. "I've gotten calls all day long about cats," an exhausted Bailey said.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
  DUSTIN Laws was surrounded. There was the yowling at night. The cat squatting in his flowerpot, claiming it as a litter box. And, of course, the frisky felines right in front of his house, doing the deed. "It's, like, take it somewhere else!" Laws said. Stray cats were taking over his tiny Queen Village block. It's not the only cat invasion in the city. We also spoke with the president of the West Passyunk Neighbors Association, who said that dozens of stray cats were seeking refuge in an RV abandoned in a vacant lot on Snyder Avenue.
NEWS
June 11, 1998 | By Lisa Shafer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stray cats and adventurous pet cats alike must watch their strut in this town. Under a new feline ordinance, cats wandering on alleys, streets or sidewalks or onto neighbors' lawns without their owners can be seized by borough officers, impounded, and even "destroyed in a humane fashion. " Destruction will take place only if the owners fail to claim the cats within three days of being notified or if authorities fail to find an owner. On Monday, the Borough Council unanimously approved the ordinance, which also limits the number of adult cats in a house to one per 500 square feet of property.
NEWS
August 9, 1992 | By Patricia Quigley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Some undesirables are roaming the streets of Clementon, 50 to 60 strong, mooching meals, sleeping wherever they can find a comfortable spot and, yes, reproducing like rabbits. Well, maybe not like bunnies, but certainly like cats. Indeed, the undesirables are cats, some thought to be strays and some thought to belong to residents who have not licensed them. And local officials are doing something about them. Borough Council has authorized the use of Have-a-Heart traps to catch the cats.
NEWS
April 17, 1997 | By John Murphy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Hoping to curb the threat of rabies, Montgomery County Health Department officials are cracking down on abandoned cats in West Norriton that may carry the virus. So far, 17 felines have been trapped in and around Norristown State Hospital, where health officials say as many as 25 strays are living in the woods and fields. "People are feeding the cats there," said Mike Baysinger, county supervisor for communicable diseases. Fear of a rabies outbreak in the area began in February, when a cat attacked a West Norriton woman.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
A woman was arrested after killing a stray cat and injuring two others by dousing them with ammonia Tuesday afternoon in the Mill Creek section of West Philadelphia, authorities said. The woman, who lives in the 4800 block of Westminster Street, was trying to get rid of stray cats in her neighborhood, said George Bengal, head of humane law enforcement for the Pennsylvania SPCA. "If people have an issue with cats in their neighborhood, there are agencies and organizations that can help.
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NEWS
November 24, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
AS WINTER'S CHILL blankets the Delaware riverfront, Teresa Reed and Tracey McKenna are losing time in a race that could mean life or death for dozens of abandoned cats in a colony at Pier 70 in South Philadelphia. Since a promised donation of new materials to build shelters for the cats on the pier fell through in recent weeks, the women - two among a group of people who care for the 30-some cats there - are scrambling to track down enough makeshift kitty shelters to protect the felines from the elements.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
  If you're a fan of rockabilly - the blues-country-swing music that birthed rock-and-roll in the 1950s - you enjoy a lot of cultural options, locally and nationally. And a big local blowout is right around the corner. Rockabilly is a frequent roots-music choice of AAA radio stations such as WXPN-FM. It thrives at local venues that include Glenside's Blue Comet and Wilmington's Oddity Bar. Aficionados have the Saturday-morning Rockabilly Roadhouse podcast (rockabillyroadhouse.com)
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA For years, the residents of Fillmore Street say, the 1600 block of this tiny residential street has seemed home to more cats than people. That's where a woman named Alaine Jacobson ran an animal-rescue nonprofit out of two adjoining rowhouses, midway down the block in East Frankford. Cars pulled up to drop off unwanted cats. Enormous bags of cat food sat piled in the lot next door. In the summer, neighbors say, the stench of cat urine soaked the block. At some point, a sign was tacked to her fence: "I'm The Crazy Cat Lady," it read, "And This Is The Crazy Cat House.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
At dusk, they appear: lounging on porches, sprawled across cars, picking through the weeds in abandoned lots in Coatesville. Residents call the situation "torture. " City officials have been swamped with calls. "I couldn't even go in my backyard. You couldn't see nothing but the cats," said Michelle Adderton, of the 700 block of Diamond Street. "I couldn't go out my back door because there were kittens on the porch. " Adderton and other residents of the Chester County city of 13,000 fear that Coatesville is going to the cats.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU DON'T SEE people like Carita Hernandez when TV breaks on the news. But they're there. In fact, without them there wouldn't be a broadcast at all. "You may have never seen her face on 'Action News,' but you saw her work, and, as such, a part of her spirit," said Brian Taff, a news anchor at 6 ABC. Carita, who worked at the station for 32 years, was the woman in the van whose job was to take the video footage shot at the scene, edit it...
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester Township family is being treated for exposure to rabies after taking in a sick stray kitten that died a day later, Camden County health officials said Friday. The unidentified family of two adults and two children found the kitten Tuesday night and tried to nurse it back to health, the officials said in a statement. But the kitten died Wednesday night, and a township animal control officer who picked it up arranged to have it tested for rabies the next morning. Test results came back positive Friday, and officials told the family members they would have to receive rabies prophylaxis shots because of their exposure to the animal.
NEWS
July 4, 2012
A woman was arrested after killing a stray cat and injuring two others by dousing them with ammonia Tuesday afternoon in the Mill Creek section of West Philadelphia, authorities said. The woman, who lives in the 4800 block of Westminster Street, was trying to get rid of stray cats in her neighborhood, said George Bengal, head of humane law enforcement for the Pennsylvania SPCA. "If people have an issue with cats in their neighborhood, there are agencies and organizations that can help.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | BY JULIANA REYES
  DUSTIN Laws was surrounded. There was the yowling at night. The cat squatting in his flowerpot, claiming it as a litter box. And, of course, the frisky felines right in front of his house, doing the deed. "It's, like, take it somewhere else!" Laws said. Stray cats were taking over his tiny Queen Village block. It's not the only cat invasion in the city. We also spoke with the president of the West Passyunk Neighbors Association, who said that dozens of stray cats were seeking refuge in an RV abandoned in a vacant lot on Snyder Avenue.
NEWS
July 16, 2011 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, campisg@phillynews.com 215-854-5935
PEOPLE THREATEN to call the cops on cat rescuer Teresa Reed all the time. In fact, somebody at a South Philadelphia bar did, and a patron came outside and threatened to pour antifreeze into the water she and other feline-friendly volunteers left behind for cats living in a nearby alleyway if she didn't stop, she said. Police told Reed to feed the cats at a different time. Now she gets to care for the strays at 6 a.m., when no one else is around. "The men in the bar come out and urinate up this alley, but they don't want the cats there," Reed fumes.
NEWS
July 24, 2010 | By Elisa Lala, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Just as Amanda Casazza and Deborah Calvert stepped out of their van on Florida Avenue near the Boardwalk, it began to drizzle. Undeterred, the duo crossed the wooden planks and headed for the beach, scanning the sand for their friends. "Oh, look, there's one of them," Calvert said, pointing to a mostly black cat skidding across the sand toward the underside of the boards. "The rest will come out when they see we brought food. " The women are members of Alley Cat Allies' Boardwalk Cats project, which cares for the 200-plus feral cats living under the Boardwalk planks from Albany to New Hampshire Avenues.
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