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Stray Dogs

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NEWS
May 10, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / CHARLES FOX
WHO'S IN CHARGE HERE? This man, who declined to identify himself, has taken in nine stray dogs (because he's soft-hearted, he says). And four times a day he walks them - eight at a time, which is the most he's comfortable handling. Here the motley assemblage lurches onward along Wingohocking Street on the edge of Hunting Park.
NEWS
March 15, 1996 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
GRATUITOUS GESTURE A BIT TOO GRAND, SAYS TIPPLER The tippler wasn't tipsy when he gave her a $1,000 tip on a $3.95 gin-and-tonic, says waitress Ruth Bullis. But, the tippler says regardless, he overtipped and wants a refund. No way, says Bullis. Besides, it's already spent. Bullis and her coworkers at Stanford's Restaurant and Bar in Lake Oswego, Ore., say the 50ish gent wasn't even addled when he signed the gratuity-generous credit-card slip in November. Besides, "once someone gives you a tip, that's it," explained Bullis.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | By Adrienne Beard, Special to The Inquirer
The president of the Modena Borough Council and borough residents had a similar complaint at the council meeting Monday night: stray dogs. President Clayton Ayers was particularly upset at the Chester County SPCA, which has a contract with Modena to handle strays. "The SPCA tells us to catch the dogs, and then they charge us $35 to pick them up," said Ayers. "We shouldn't have to be doing their job. " It is the SPCA's job to catch the dogs, according to Ayers. "The SPCA expects us to trap and bundle the dogs," he said.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
How much do Americans love their dogs? Enough to spend an annual average of $1,955 per pet to feed them, tend to their medical needs, clothe them, groom them, amuse them, and have them professionally walked, among modern canines' many needs. But the national passion for pooches seems to wane when it comes time to license them. The large majority of owners do not make the potentially lifesaving purchase of a tag. There are an estimated 3.2 million pet dogs in Pennsylvania, yet only about 20 percent have the required state license.
NEWS
December 1, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - With animal shelters closing their doors to homeless dogs and other shelters facing financial pressures, the question plaguing animal-welfare advocates is this: Where to put the thousands of stray dogs found roaming throughout state each year? The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture convened the first-ever statewide meeting of shelters Tuesday to address this issue. About 50 representatives of shelters from Erie to Philadelphia, along with humane officers, municipal officials, rescue groups, and state dog wardens, outlined an array of animal-control problems facing communities.
NEWS
April 14, 1996 | By Pam Louwagie, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Allowing Fido to wander through this quaint little town could become expensive soon. Effective immediately, borough police will enforce long-ignored dog laws and cite owners who allow their puppies to piddle on sidewalks or fertilize lawns. Failing to scoop behind a dog could mean a fine of up to $300. Costs for picking up strays will be at least $65. Borough Council members told police to start issuing citations after residents complained last month. The problem is especially potent on playgrounds near Goodnoe Elementary School and walkways through Linton Park, said Borough Council President Marcia Scull.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | By Marc Freeman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Bensalem dog owners may soon have to comply with a leash law in the township, which would prohibit canines from running at large. Besides the dog control ordinance, the township administration is considering possible regulations that would limit the number of dogs a resident could own. Dick Bolinski, Bensalem's animal control officer, said he had asked the Township Council to enact a leash law because some residents created a nuisance by...
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gloucester County freeholders moved a step closer yesterday to building a much-debated animal shelter by naming a Willingboro architect to design the facility. The board authorized the county to negotiate a contract with Gary Evans Ryan, who designed Burlington County's animal shelter in Westampton Township. "That's the reason (Gloucester County) was interested in me," Ryan said. "They saw the building here in Burlington and they approached me. " Animal-rights activists have lobbied hard for a county-run shelter, which they said would be far better than private facilities scattered in various communities.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | By Mac Daniel, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Two stray dogs caused havoc at a Cheltenham elementary school, with one adult crossing guard being bitten and one dog being killed, according to police reports. At 8:24 a.m. Tuesday, a Rottweiler and a malamute were seen near Myers Elementary School at Montgomery and Union Avenues. While children were crossing the street near the school, witnesses said, the dogs approached the crosswalk. The Rottweiler began to growl at the children and the crossing guard. When the guard backed away, the Rottweiler attacked her, biting her left arm and causing her to fall to the ground.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The operator of a Voorhees animal shelter was fined $250 plus court costs yesterday after pleading guilty to charges of violating New Jersey's sanitary code. David Kirby, who operates the Animal Care League, a nonprofit shelter that collects stray dogs and cats from 22 Camden County and two Gloucester County municipalities, had been charged with numerous violations of the code, most of them stemming from the opening of the shelter 15 months ago, according to records of the Camden County Health Department.
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SPORTS
February 12, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
APPARENTLY, THE biathlon is to Russia what curling is to Canada. The quirky sport that is a combination of cross-country skiing and target shooting is one of the early breakout events on Russian television at the Sochi Games. A recent poll conducted by the Russian pollster, Levada-Center, showed that 37 percent of respondents named the biathlon as the winter sport in which they were most interested. They put it second behind figure skating (42 percent) but ahead of hockey (34 percent)
NEWS
December 25, 2012 | By Luis Andres Henao, Associated Press
SANTIAGO, Chile - They don't have demands, but they're loyal to the cause and are always on the front lines of the fight. They run with protesters, lap up shots from water cannons, bark at police in riot gear, and sometimes even bite officers. Stray dogs are truly man's best friend for thousands of students and workers who demonstrate and clash with police nearly every day to press demands for education improvements, redistribution of Chile's wealth, and environmental protections. As the protests become fixtures in this modernizing capital, normally unnoticed street dogs have become stars in their own right, with the Facebook fan pages and fawning media coverage to prove it. "Blacky," a mutt adopted by young protesters, has become the most visible mascot, with rival fan pages totaling more than 7,000 subscribers or "likes.
NEWS
May 2, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
What's Gov. Corbett got against puppies? After years of complaints from dog lovers and people who unknowingly purchased sick and dying pets that had been raised inside puppy-mill cages no bigger than a rabbit hutch, Pennsylvania passed a 2008 law ensuring humane treatment for tens of thousands of kennel dwellers. That law, aimed at ridding Pennsylvania of its reputation as the worst puppy-mill state in the East, has served as a model for 20 other states. But Corbett isn't interested in its enforcement.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A dog that shelter workers called the victim of the worst cruelty they had ever seen is recovering at the Delaware County SPCA. It will be five to seven days before it is known if the pit bull-boxer mix, dubbed Curious George for his curious nature, will survive, said Justina Calgiano, spokesperson for the Media-based shelter. The dog weighs 35 pounds, half what it should, she said. His nails are overgrown, and he has sores on his backside, probably the result of sitting too long in one spot.
NEWS
November 1, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A dog that shelter workers called the victim of the worst cruelty they had ever seen is recovering at the Delaware County SPCA. It will be five to seven days before it is known if the pit bull-boxer mix, dubbed Curious George for his curious nature, will survive, said Justina Calgiano, spokesperson for the Media-based shelter. The dog weighs 35 pounds, half what it should, she said. His nails are overgrown, and he has sores on his backside, probably the result of sitting too long in one spot.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
How much do Americans love their dogs? Enough to spend an annual average of $1,955 per pet to feed them, tend to their medical needs, clothe them, groom them, amuse them, and have them professionally walked, among modern canines' many needs. But the national passion for pooches seems to wane when it comes time to license them. The large majority of owners do not make the potentially lifesaving purchase of a tag. There are an estimated 3.2 million pet dogs in Pennsylvania, yet only about 20 percent have the required state license.
NEWS
May 31, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Almost a year has passed since the Delaware County SPCA warned it would get out of the lost-and-found business as of this summer. Townships and boroughs that for a century had deposited their stray animals at the Media shelter - as many as 2,000 critters last year and 4,300 the year before - would have to find other accommodations. But with the July 1 deadline bearing down on them, most of the 49 municipalities still have no Plan B. They include Upper Darby and Chester City, which last year accounted for 41 percent of the strays dropped off at the SPCA.
NEWS
December 1, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - With animal shelters closing their doors to homeless dogs and other shelters facing financial pressures, the question plaguing animal-welfare advocates is this: Where to put the thousands of stray dogs found roaming throughout state each year? The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture convened the first-ever statewide meeting of shelters Tuesday to address this issue. About 50 representatives of shelters from Erie to Philadelphia, along with humane officers, municipal officials, rescue groups, and state dog wardens, outlined an array of animal-control problems facing communities.
NEWS
September 27, 2009 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Sheena Bowa was 3, she traded her tricycle for a dog. "It just followed me home," she explained to her mother, neglecting to mention the swap. Her mother, reasoning that not too many strays come equipped with a leash, quickly reversed the transaction. Bowa's first pet was a cat, and a cocker spaniel and black spitz followed. When she was married to Larry Bowa, the former Phillies shortstop, he knew exactly how to celebrate their first wedding anniversary. He gave her a cocker spaniel, which Sheena named Muggsy.
NEWS
September 27, 2009 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Sheena Bowa was 3, she traded her tricycle for a dog. "It just followed me home," she explained to her mother, neglecting to mention the swap. Her mother, reasoning that not too many strays come equipped with a leash, quickly reversed the transaction. Bowa's first pet was a cat, and a cocker spaniel and black spitz followed. When she was married to Larry Bowa, the former Phillies shortstop, he knew exactly how to celebrate their first wedding anniversary. He gave her a cocker spaniel, which Sheena named Muggsy.
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