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Street Art

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NEWS
June 21, 2004
AS OUR CITY struggles with an uncertain future and a shaky economy, the first budget casualty of 2004 reveals a great deal about where we might be headed. The mayor's decision to eliminate the Office of Arts and Culture is a short-sighted attempt to save mere pennies that could cost the city large dollars in the years ahead. Philadelphia needs an Office of Arts and Culture because it's good public policy. Most comparable cities - including Chicago, Boston, L.A. and New York - have a substantial department of cultural affairs.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The L.A.-based street artist WRDSMTH wanted to come to Philly. To do some installations - to put up some work. So he called Conrad Benner. Of course he did. Who else would he call? For four years, Benner has tirelessly showcased Philly's robust street art scene though his enormously popular blog and Instagram feed, Streets Dept. He grew up in Fishtown enamored of graffiti and street art - from the Philly tradition dating to graffiti pioneer Cornbread through the Mural Arts programs and the new pieces he saw popping up all around him on an endless canvas of abandoned homes and factories.
TRAVEL
January 22, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
MIAMI - Beyond this gateway city's endless stretch of beachfront condos and restaurant-lined avenues, in what was once a desolate warehouse district, street art and graffiti have been elevated to a new level in a park named Wynwood Walls. Often called the Museum of the Streets, this urban gallery featuring murals by renowned artists from all over the world has no admission fee. Its creator, real estate maven Tony Goldman, had an epiphany after visiting midtown Miami's Wynwood neighborhood with his son, Joey, in 2005.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, STAFF WRITER russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987@ValerieRussDN
There are no graffiti on the quiet East Germantown block of redbrick rowhouses where Darryl McCray lives. His home is modest, with a pink hydrangea bush out front. A black-and-white cat sleeps beneath a beige patio chair. For McCray, 62, it's a subdued existence, considering that at one time he had celebrity status due entirely to the nickname he spray-painted all over Philadelphia: Cornbread. Legend has it that at age 17 he hopped a fence at the Philadelphia Zoo to spray-paint "Cornbread Lives" on the hind side of an elephant, a stunt to disprove a newspaper article that had mistakenly declared "Cornbread Shot to Death" about a murder outside a bar at 40th and Filbert Streets in West Philly.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Murals in Philadelphia have been created, variously, to uplift underserved communities, honor local leaders, fight blight, and amplify grassroots causes. Now, in a swath of the city's Callowhill area, they're advancing a new goal: rebranding a neighborhood. Artists commissioned by the city's Mural Arts Program are installing nine permanent and temporary murals that, collectively, create a revolving outdoor gallery billed as "Spring Arts District. " That also happens to be the identity that developer Craig Grossman, who sought and partially funded the project, is trying to cultivate in this gentrifying stretch between Eighth and 12th, from Noble to Spring Garden Streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2011 | BY MOLLY EICHEL, eichelm@phillynews.com 215-854-5909
A DRAWING of a naked woman scrawled with the catcall "Damn Girl You Thick," Beyoncé song lyrics spray-painted on a wall, a small sticker with the scribbled message "osama is a muslim. " The funny, the political, the colorful, the arresting: These are the images that catch Conrad Benner's eye as he walks around Philadelphia, camera in hand. Benner, 26, posts pictures of street art to his blog StreetsDept.com, which averages about 1,000 page-views a day, and sends on-the-fly pictures out on his Twitter account, @streetsdept, to his 2,636 (as of yesterday)
NEWS
August 11, 2016
ISSUE | DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION Arts can help us get past anger, prejudice During the Democratic National Convention, the arts and culture community's museums and performing-arts venues showed off the beauty and vibrancy of Philadelphia. More importantly, cultural groups stepped up with messages of unity, justice, and civic duty through pop-up performances on Broad Street, a youth art contest to inspire future voters from Fleisher Art Memorial, an issue-based voting display at the Free Library, and political street art. Hundreds of engaging community events and activities allowed locals and convention-goers to use their voice, share their beliefs, and offer social and political solutions.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
"Exit Though the Gift Shop" is a funny romp through the art world, and while I don't know if it's a bona fide documentary, I know what I like. The movie is the purported record of a friendship between notorious U.K. street-art renegade Banksy and a goofball camera bug named Thierry Guetta. They met as Guetta assembled a video archive of the street-art movement in Europe and the United States. Or so says Banksy, who does not inspire confidence as a reliable narrator. He lives an anonymous life and appears on camera in shadow, underneath a hoodie.
TRAVEL
December 21, 2014 | By Jonathan Ma, For The Inquirer
Graffiti crawl up exterior walls like webs of ivy, bending and twisting around rows of shuttered windows. At some street corners, layers of posters pile unevenly over this graffiti like papier mâché, stitching together urban blocks. When I traveled to Greece this year, my original itinerary focused on ancient history sites: the Parthenon, the National Archaeological Museum, and the Agora. These places all tell valuable Greek stories from centuries past through classical busts, orderly columns, and symmetrical ruins.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2011
Bill Cunningham New York Terrifically entertaining and insightful documentary about the intrepid New York Times photographer whose "On the Street" column celebrates high fashion, inventive style, and all that is New York - from the rich and swell to the poor and natty. A movie that celebrates photojournalism and clothes, to be sure, but also one that celebrates individualism, integrity, urban living, street art, magazines and newspapers, and the absolute essentialness of a vintage three-speed bike.
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NEWS
August 11, 2016
ISSUE | DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION Arts can help us get past anger, prejudice During the Democratic National Convention, the arts and culture community's museums and performing-arts venues showed off the beauty and vibrancy of Philadelphia. More importantly, cultural groups stepped up with messages of unity, justice, and civic duty through pop-up performances on Broad Street, a youth art contest to inspire future voters from Fleisher Art Memorial, an issue-based voting display at the Free Library, and political street art. Hundreds of engaging community events and activities allowed locals and convention-goers to use their voice, share their beliefs, and offer social and political solutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2016 | By Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
Murals in Philadelphia have been created, variously, to uplift underserved communities, honor local leaders, fight blight, and amplify grassroots causes. Now, in a swath of the city's Callowhill area, they're advancing a new goal: rebranding a neighborhood. Artists commissioned by the city's Mural Arts Program are installing nine permanent and temporary murals that, collectively, create a revolving outdoor gallery billed as "Spring Arts District. " That also happens to be the identity that developer Craig Grossman, who sought and partially funded the project, is trying to cultivate in this gentrifying stretch between Eighth and 12th, from Noble to Spring Garden Streets.
NEWS
June 28, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Thousands of arts and crafts lovers strolled along Manayunk's Main Street on Sunday afternoon from Shurs Lane to Green Street, ogling the creations of 300 painters, potters, sculptors, photographers, jewelry and clothing designers, and mixed-media makers. The final day of the weekend's Manayunk Arts Festival also featured dozens of newer artists in the Emerging Artists Tent. The most unusual of these was W.P. Galiczynski, a concrete contractor from Fourth Street and Girard Avenue who paints street scenes of his beloved native Kensington, with a twist.
NEWS
June 26, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, STAFF WRITER russv@phillynews.com 215-854-5987@ValerieRussDN
There are no graffiti on the quiet East Germantown block of redbrick rowhouses where Darryl McCray lives. His home is modest, with a pink hydrangea bush out front. A black-and-white cat sleeps beneath a beige patio chair. For McCray, 62, it's a subdued existence, considering that at one time he had celebrity status due entirely to the nickname he spray-painted all over Philadelphia: Cornbread. Legend has it that at age 17 he hopped a fence at the Philadelphia Zoo to spray-paint "Cornbread Lives" on the hind side of an elephant, a stunt to disprove a newspaper article that had mistakenly declared "Cornbread Shot to Death" about a murder outside a bar at 40th and Filbert Streets in West Philly.
TRAVEL
January 18, 2016
Name: www.walkmysteps.com . What it does: The website offers small private tours of Paris with licensed local guides who want to help you discover the city. Available in eight languages. What's hot: The tour size is capped at a number that varies - sometimes only six persons, other times four. Some tours allow as many as 10 people. With that kind of attention, you can be sure all your questions will be answered. One tour might take you to explore the famous sites of Montmartre, as well as its hidden stairs and alleys.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | Drew Lazor, For Daily News
Street art, by its very definition, is temporary. But when you're literally sketching on the street, the window of time between "voila!" and "Where'd it go?" can be devastatingly small. Just ask Sara Walker. A server and resident artist at Center City's Jose Pistola's, she busted out the chalk bucket the second the eighth annual Philly Beer Week came around earlier this summer. She spent hours hunched over the 15th Street sidewalk, scratching out an elaborate series of colorful illustrations promoting the bar's dozens of scheduled Beer Week events.
NEWS
June 11, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
The L.A.-based street artist WRDSMTH wanted to come to Philly. To do some installations - to put up some work. So he called Conrad Benner. Of course he did. Who else would he call? For four years, Benner has tirelessly showcased Philly's robust street art scene though his enormously popular blog and Instagram feed, Streets Dept. He grew up in Fishtown enamored of graffiti and street art - from the Philly tradition dating to graffiti pioneer Cornbread through the Mural Arts programs and the new pieces he saw popping up all around him on an endless canvas of abandoned homes and factories.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
MURAL ARTIST Eurhi Jones has turned the north wall of Bodine High School into a gigantic ocean wave, created a spectacular jungle on the exterior of the Philadelphia Zoo parking garage and painted a wildlife-rich "Walk Through a Pennsylvania Forest" at the Please Touch Museum. Now, she has turned her eye-popping palette and her passion for nature into a 10-block, 50-artworks trail that winds through her own neighborhood, Manayunk, and leads people to the new Venice Island Performing Arts & Recreation Center on the Schuylkill River.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2015 | By Victoria Mier, For The Inquirer
Inside the art gallery at the end of the block on South Fourth Street, an eclectic array of artwork is bathed in harsh slants of light. Somehow both gritty and clean, lost-object art by an artist named MyDogSighs hangs across from A Common Name's stunning geodes, gleaming and winking in the light. The two artists, the former from the United Kingdom, the latter from California, were brought to Philadelphia by an arts initiative named HAHA x Paradigm. A collaborative effort of Paradigm Gallery, owned by Jason Chen and Sara McCorriston, and Ginger Rudolph's global art publication HAHA magazine, HAHA x Paradigm is focused on bringing art to the community.
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