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Street Artist

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NEWS
July 14, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AN ENIGMATIC Brooklynite spent Thursday night painting Will Smith's face next to a taco on a wall in Northern Liberties. Pictures of "The Fresh Prince of Taco Bel-Air" went viral on social media almost instantly - another success for the street artist who calls himself Hanksy. "Philly was a toss-up. It was either going to be 'Boy Meets World' or 'Fresh Prince'-oriented; Big Willy won out I guess," Hanksy told the Daily News . No, that's not a typo. The 30-year-old draws inspiration from the famous British artist and activist.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
What's a painting worth? Like real estate and an athlete's salary, whatever the buyer is willing to pay. Exit Through the Gift Shop is a beguiling and subversively funny entertainment that considers art's worth from many angles, including that of guerrilla painters, gallerists, and seasoned collectors. The film is directed by and features Banksy, pseudonymous street artist and provocateur, notorious for his 2004 forgery of British banknotes that swapped the queen's image for that of Princess Diana.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Poignant beyond words, The Cats of Mirikitani is comparable to finding a pearl in a pile of oyster shells. In 2001, filmmaker Linda Hattendorf encountered street artist Jimmy Mirikitani, 80, huddled under the awning of a corner grocery near her SoHo studio. Initially, she was drawn by his fanciful sketches of cats. But when Hattendorf listened to what other passersby heard as the ravings of a street person, she made a human and artistic connection. She started filming their encounters, and the result is a compelling journal of their growing intimacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2005 | By Rob Watson INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You've seen his work all over Philly, yet you probably don't know him. Those stencils, stickers and posters of the wrestler. It's a face most can't recall, born out of one artist's attempt to get the masses to stop and think, if just for second. Though now firmly entrenched in the world of capitalistic cool with his Los Angeles-based marketing and design firm, Studio Number One, 35-year-old street artist Shepard Fairey still has a hand in agitation through imagery. His latest example is "Manufacturing Dissent," an exhibition opening tonight at the Black Floor Gallery in Center City.
NEWS
February 2, 1989 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Talk about luck. The way developer David Marshall remembers it, he was at a cocktail party when he bumped into Jane Korman, who runs the Swan Gallery at 18th and Sansom Streets. They were chit-chatting about this and that when Korman asked him what kind of art he planned to use in Marshall's most visible project, the Rittenhouse - the jagged, mixed-use high-rise angling off the western edge of Rittenhouse Square. Marshall, who acquired the long-unfinished building last year, said he intended to use the usual - old prints, maps, what have you. Forget that, Korman told him. Go see Joe Barker, the street artist who often works at 18th and Sansom.
NEWS
October 7, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before her fiery, public death, Kathy Chang tried out different accelerants on cuts of meat, wanting to see which would burn fastest and hottest. It was a macabre experiment by a street artist and activist who joyfully preached peace and possibility. For more than a decade in the 1980s and '90s, she haunted the University of Pennsylvania campus, staging theatrical one-woman protests against U.S. aggression, corporate greed, and big government. She dressed in striking, handmade costumes, as a butterfly or an ersatz Wonder Woman, proclaiming that glorious political change could be achieved through the Transformation Party, which she founded.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
James Rizzi, 61, a New York-born and -based pop artist best known for his playful and childlike three-dimensional sculptures, died peacefully at his studio in New York's SoHo district Monday. No cause of death was given. He was born in Brooklyn and studied art at the University of Florida. He returned to New York in 1974 and first made his name as a street artist. He became known for his bright, cartoonlike drawings and 3-D constructions. Mr. Rizzi developed a large international following, especially in Germany.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
It had all the elements of a mystery: blueprints of a classified nuclear weapons plant in the hands of an unknown Philadelphia street artist. The blueprints surfaced last week amid stories that the Savannah River plant in Aiken, S.C., had experienced several near-meltdown accidents that were never reported to Washington. How could plans for such a super-secret government installation be floating around Philadelphia streets? Here's how the story unfolded: A Philadelphia industrial designer, who has requested anonymity, says that about 1 1/2 years ago two of his friends, while strolling in Center City, agreed to be sketched by a street artist in return for a few dollars.
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NEWS
October 7, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Before her fiery, public death, Kathy Chang tried out different accelerants on cuts of meat, wanting to see which would burn fastest and hottest. It was a macabre experiment by a street artist and activist who joyfully preached peace and possibility. For more than a decade in the 1980s and '90s, she haunted the University of Pennsylvania campus, staging theatrical one-woman protests against U.S. aggression, corporate greed, and big government. She dressed in striking, handmade costumes, as a butterfly or an ersatz Wonder Woman, proclaiming that glorious political change could be achieved through the Transformation Party, which she founded.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
AN ENIGMATIC Brooklynite spent Thursday night painting Will Smith's face next to a taco on a wall in Northern Liberties. Pictures of "The Fresh Prince of Taco Bel-Air" went viral on social media almost instantly - another success for the street artist who calls himself Hanksy. "Philly was a toss-up. It was either going to be 'Boy Meets World' or 'Fresh Prince'-oriented; Big Willy won out I guess," Hanksy told the Daily News . No, that's not a typo. The 30-year-old draws inspiration from the famous British artist and activist.
NEWS
September 24, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kid Hazo stalked the Philadelphia Parking Authority Sunday and found its minions remarkably elusive. Normally, the blue uniforms swarm the city. Normally, 1/18th of a second after a meter runs out, they materialize and slap a ticket on the windshield. Normally, their cars lurk around every corner. On a busy, beautiful fall weekend, however, when it was nearly impossible to find a free, legal spot to park, the force was literally not with him. It took four hours for Hazo to find a parked traffic enforcement car. When he finally did, victory was delicious.
NEWS
June 3, 2012 | Michael Harrington
Sunday Summer essential Summer's here, as you may have noticed by that sheen of perpetual perspiration. For some, enjoying the season means a bike, backpack, or baseball mitt. For others, it means a refreshing beverage enjoyed from fine and functional outdoor furniture. Which brings us to the Adirondack chair. Designed in 1903, the chair has a slatted, slanted back and wide armrests that make it the perfect perch for enjoying the outdoors from the right perspective.
NEWS
March 6, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer
It was a typical summer Saturday night on South Street, filled with shoppers and revelers and at least one artistic woman drawing vivid, hippy patterns on the sidewalk with chalk. The artist, Emily Hamilton Epstein, wasn't doing anything wrong on June 19, 2010, when Police Officer William J. Gress came around, her attorney told the Daily News. "She hadn't done anything wrong and we're very concerned about an officer who's arresting people for activities that clearly aren't illegal," Paul Messing said.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
James Rizzi, 61, a New York-born and -based pop artist best known for his playful and childlike three-dimensional sculptures, died peacefully at his studio in New York's SoHo district Monday. No cause of death was given. He was born in Brooklyn and studied art at the University of Florida. He returned to New York in 1974 and first made his name as a street artist. He became known for his bright, cartoonlike drawings and 3-D constructions. Mr. Rizzi developed a large international following, especially in Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2011
YIS GOODWIN, the street artist known as NoseGo, is also utilizing new technology to propagate his work, but in a different fashion from Conrad Benner. Goodwin, the creative art director at Broken Compass Studios, recently released his first iPhone game called "Catball Eats it All. " The premise is simple: A wide-eyed furball of a cat bounces around a course trying to eat as much as possible. The more it eats, the bigger it grows, with only its archenemy Dogwall standing in its way. But what separates this game from the average iPhone app is that the characters and backgrounds were hand-painted by Goodwin, reflecting his style of bright colors and whacked-out animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
What's a painting worth? Like real estate and an athlete's salary, whatever the buyer is willing to pay. Exit Through the Gift Shop is a beguiling and subversively funny entertainment that considers art's worth from many angles, including that of guerrilla painters, gallerists, and seasoned collectors. The film is directed by and features Banksy, pseudonymous street artist and provocateur, notorious for his 2004 forgery of British banknotes that swapped the queen's image for that of Princess Diana.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Poignant beyond words, The Cats of Mirikitani is comparable to finding a pearl in a pile of oyster shells. In 2001, filmmaker Linda Hattendorf encountered street artist Jimmy Mirikitani, 80, huddled under the awning of a corner grocery near her SoHo studio. Initially, she was drawn by his fanciful sketches of cats. But when Hattendorf listened to what other passersby heard as the ravings of a street person, she made a human and artistic connection. She started filming their encounters, and the result is a compelling journal of their growing intimacy.
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