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Street Crime

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NEWS
April 26, 1998 | By Clea Benson and Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Spurred by a new emphasis on ridding neighborhoods of nuisance crime and drug dealing, Philadelphia police are making many more arrests than usual, raising concerns about whether the courts and prisons can handle the volume. Total arrests across the city are up 15 to 25 percent from last year. That translates to an extra 200 to 300 suspects booked and fingerprinted each week. The effects are rippling through the criminal justice system. In Municipal Court, where preliminary hearings and misdemeanor trials are held, the caseload is up 30 percent since the beginning of the year.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
Chocolate croissants and Gitanes cigarettes, bread and butter. Sam's Place. The very name of the grocery store is inviting, casual, hip - much like the neighborhood. But things have changed at the decades-old landmark on 45th Street off Pine, in the idealistic and eclectic heart of University City. Metal grates were put up over the windows. A shuttered gate was installed over the door. Surveillance cameras were set up next to the toilet paper. And the owner and night manager started carrying guns.
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Violent street crime in Camden dipped in the first three months that the city has been patrolled by a newly formed Camden County-run police force, particularly in two neighborhoods where the initial effort was concentrated, officials said Tuesday. Citywide, daytime nonfatal shootings decreased 44 percent, from 39 victims to 22 from May 1 - the force's start date - to July 31 compared with the same period last year, according to crime statistics issued by the new force and titled "Marks of Progress.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crediting tips from citizens who have had enough of crime, Philadelphia police yesterday showed off an impressive heap of illicit drugs, guns and money gathered from across the city in just one day, along with a new way drug dealers are hiding cocaine. Chief Inspector Teri Clark of the police narcotics bureau stood behind a table bearing what she said were $400,000 worth of cocaine and marijuana, $80,000 in cash, and 15 weapons, including 10 handguns and an AK-47 "pitched out a window" during a police raid.
NEWS
November 16, 1998
There are two common responses to street crime in our communities. We either throw up our hands or ball up our fists. Throwing up our hands puts us in a posture of resignation. Balling up our fists puts us in peril. But the three-day "Conference on Preventing Crime in the Black Community," which ended Saturday, brought together a group of activists who offered a third response. They rolled up their sleeves. Street crime is our problem, and not just in the black community. In convening the conference, State Sen. Hardy Williams and State Attorney General Mike Fisher were not making the point that street crime is a problem peculiar to black communities or perpetrated solely by black criminals.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
THE BEST PART of Philadelphia are the people who live here. My wife and I have lived here for 35 years. There isn't one part of the city we haven't visited, and they all have provided positive results. Our neighborhood in Roxborough is everything urban living is all about. We frequent Latino and Asian supermarkets, and that makes food shopping a real experience. The kindness and understanding is off the charts. My wife is Latina and I lived overseas, so we go everywhere. Sure, we take part in the Art Museum and all the ArsNova shows, but it is at street level that Philly rules!
NEWS
January 16, 1986 | By LINN WASHINGTON, Daily News Staff Writer
Charles Horace sat in the balcony of the Jones Memorial Baptist Church in North Philadelphia last night, listening to the suggestions of top city officials on how to combat the violent crime that has plagued his community in the past two months. Horace told the 200 people attending the anti-crime meeting that increased Town Watch patrols and the use of Freon warning horns were good countermeasures to street crime, but he said he has his own solution. "I started carrying a hammer," he said.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | By Heather N. Bandur, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Breathing new life into an aging downtown and reducing street crime and drug sales was the common thread linking mayoral and council candidates during last night's election debate. "I think we can clean up the community," said Mayor Alvin G. Shpeen, 68, a Democrat who has served as mayor since David Dougherty vacated the post in February. "Clean up your yard. Clean up your curbside, and we'll help you do that with grants," Shpeen said. The town has received two grants for a total of $450,000 this year, Shpeen said, which will be used to restore dilapidated storefronts, as well as install lighting and new sidewalks.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa gave a spirited defense Tuesday of the state's gun-buyback program, asserting that thousands of potential crime weapons have been taken off the street. Chiesa, in testimony before the Assembly budget committee, acknowledged criticism from some quarters that the program had little impact on crime, but insisted that "gun buybacks are helping to make New Jersey safer, and because they're paid for with criminal forfeiture funds, they don't cost the taxpayers a penny.
NEWS
July 11, 1991 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Police Department is going to join the rest of the 20th century: Its records will be computerized. Police Commissioner Willie L. Williams said yesterday he expected most arrest records to go from paper to computer discs within the next 18 months. He said the department already had $2.5 million in hand and would use another $1 million from future capital funds to pay for the system. Philadelphia is one of the last major cities to enter the computer age, he said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2013 | By Darran Simon, Inquirer Staff Writer
Violent street crime in Camden dipped in the first three months that the city has been patrolled by a newly formed Camden County-run police force, particularly in two neighborhoods where the initial effort was concentrated, officials said Tuesday. Citywide, daytime nonfatal shootings decreased 44 percent, from 39 victims to 22 from May 1 - the force's start date - to July 31 compared with the same period last year, according to crime statistics issued by the new force and titled "Marks of Progress.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
THE BEST PART of Philadelphia are the people who live here. My wife and I have lived here for 35 years. There isn't one part of the city we haven't visited, and they all have provided positive results. Our neighborhood in Roxborough is everything urban living is all about. We frequent Latino and Asian supermarkets, and that makes food shopping a real experience. The kindness and understanding is off the charts. My wife is Latina and I lived overseas, so we go everywhere. Sure, we take part in the Art Museum and all the ArsNova shows, but it is at street level that Philly rules!
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa gave a spirited defense Tuesday of the state's gun-buyback program, asserting that thousands of potential crime weapons have been taken off the street. Chiesa, in testimony before the Assembly budget committee, acknowledged criticism from some quarters that the program had little impact on crime, but insisted that "gun buybacks are helping to make New Jersey safer, and because they're paid for with criminal forfeiture funds, they don't cost the taxpayers a penny.
NEWS
August 9, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Construction tool , Margaux Pelegrin thought, although it happened so fast, there really wasn't time to think. Her mind was on 20-month-old Colin, her toddler napping in the backseat. Could she scoop him up and get him inside without waking him? The man - a hulk in a dirty T-shirt and shorts - kept coming at her; big strides, and she figured him for a builder. There was always lots of construction going on around her home in Fitler Square. He had a knife. Then he was on her. Before she could step out of the car or shut the door on him, he came down slashing.
NEWS
August 18, 2011
By Louis Lombardi Mayor Nutter has decided to take an ironfisted approach to the city's flash-mob problem. Although his motives and much of his response are commendable, his decision to institute a curfew for portions of the city is troubling. While last weekend's relative quiet was attributed to the curfew, its reported effectiveness does not necessarily make it right. Under the curfew, youths under 18 who are found out and about after 9 p.m. in Center City, the South Street area, and University City are subject to arrest.
NEWS
December 17, 2008 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A vaguely familiar man with close-cropped hair gazed out yesterday afternoon from an array of multiple television screens. "Eight hundred thousand children go missing every year," publicist Larry Garrison told a crowd of journalists, educators and students gathered at the Independence Visitors Center, "but only four or five get media attention. " How does any event win media attention? And how does that attention impact public perception and policy? These were the core questions of a 90-minute forum on "media literacy" sponsored in part by the Independent Film Channel and the Media Education Lab at Temple University.
NEWS
July 3, 2008 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Crediting tips from citizens who have had enough of crime, Philadelphia police yesterday showed off an impressive heap of illicit drugs, guns and money gathered from across the city in just one day, along with a new way drug dealers are hiding cocaine. Chief Inspector Teri Clark of the police narcotics bureau stood behind a table bearing what she said were $400,000 worth of cocaine and marijuana, $80,000 in cash, and 15 weapons, including 10 handguns and an AK-47 "pitched out a window" during a police raid.
NEWS
June 28, 2008 | By Adrienne Lu, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
A crowd of more than 100 people cheered yesterday as a backhoe tore into a rundown twin home well known to neighbors as a problem spot for drugs and prostitution on Camden's Marlton Avenue. The home is the first of about 80 abandoned buildings owned by the city that will be demolished over the next several months, thanks to a joint effort by the city and the state Department of Community Affairs (DCA). State Attorney General Anne Milgram said state and Camden police had identified the properties as sites of criminal activity.
NEWS
September 15, 2007 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Barbara Boyer and Mario F. Cattabiani, Inquirer Staff Writers
State troopers joined Philadelphia police on street patrols last night in an effort to combat the gun violence that left four bystanders wounded this week and keeps pushing up the city's homicide count. The initiative began at 6, only hours after Police Commissioner Sylvester M. Johnson announced Operation Trigger Lock, which will target hoodlums carrying weapons in high-crime neighborhoods. The number of troopers involved in the operation was not disclosed, nor were the specific areas where they would be deployed.
NEWS
January 20, 2007 | By Thomas Fitzgerald and Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Mayor Street embarked on a round of public events this week to sell his plan to combat violent crime. It turned into an offensive to combat the attacks on his crime record from former Councilman Michael A. Nutter and other mayoral candidates who say he should have been bolder on the issue. Street's message, in essence: It's complicated. He blamed violence, variously, on the war in Iraq, a lack of "love" in the city, media exaggeration, and politics. Candidates in the Democratic primary have used Street as a pi?ata in recent days, accusing him of a tepid violence-prevention strategy and of making excuses for the problem.
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