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Street Festival

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2006 | By Brooke Honeyford FOR THE INQUIRER
Rain or shine, Odunde's faithful will cross the South Street bridge at noon Sunday to deliver gifts of fruit and flowers to the Schuylkill below. Odunde, which translates to "Happy New Year" in the Yoruba language of Nigeria, is an annual street festival that brings alive the community bounded by Grays Ferry Avenue, South Street and 23d Streets in Philadelphia. A battery of drummers, cultural craftsmen, and a diverse crowd will gather to celebrate and honor Oshun, a Nigerian deity.
NEWS
April 27, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At 1 p.m. Friday, cars, pedestrians, and bicyclists with any common sense will have to take a detour through the heart of Center City to make way for a 200-ton crane that will lumber onto Broad Street between Locust and Pine. Once the crane is in position, a chandelier-type contraption, recently shipped here from France, will be suspended from it. Then, at sundown, a troupe of 18 aerialists from Lyons will be lifted 100 feet into the air and, hanging from the chandelier, will practice their routine, playing twinkly music and spinning in circles.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, Daily News Staff Writer spineld@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
A DASH OF discontent accompanied the music, food and dancing at the 40th anniversary of the Odunde street festival on South Street yesterday. The festival, which hosted nearly 500,000 attendees, is an annual celebration of African-American culture and tradition. It was founded in 1975 by Lois Fernandez and Ruth Arthur, who based it on a celebration by the Yoruba people of Nigeria - who celebrated the coming of another year with offerings to Oshun, the goddess of the river. Colorful vendors lit up South Street from 21st to 23rd all day, as sellers peddled cotton candy and funnel cake alongside traditional African drums and gowns.
NEWS
June 14, 1993 | By Suzette Parmley and Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A street festival in South Philadelphia was marred yesterday afternoon when two women got into an argument and one of them began firing a gun, wounding the second woman and a bystander, police said. The gunfire erupted about 5:15 p.m. as thousands thronged the area around South Street and Grays Ferry Avenue for Odunde, an annual celebration of African and African American culture. Alesha Griffin, 21, who was near 24th and Bainbridge Streets when the shooting started, was shot in the stomach.
NEWS
May 6, 1996 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / TOM GRALISH
Steve DeShong, chairman of SundayOUT, peers through a stage backdrop at 12th and Locust. Yesterday's street festival was part of PrideFest Philadelphia, which had 65 events over the last three days.
NEWS
February 2, 2005 | By Mary Catherine Roper
The Philadelphia District Attorney's decision to bring hate-crime and felony charges against protesters arrested at a gay street festival last October has attracted national attention. This is not the first time that Lynne Abraham's office has overreacted to street protests. (Remember the outrageous bail set for protesters at the Republican National Convention in 2000?) But in this case, the D.A. appears to be attempting to prosecute the protesters for their thoughts and words, rather than their conduct.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Businesses on Arch Street in Center City are hoping that a fall street festival will persuade shoppers that the street is made of more than porn parlors and a bus terminal. "Arch Street has become a place for more and more independent merchants as Chestnut Street and Market Street have been commercialized by chain stores," said Dennis Ponnock of L. Ponnock, which sells bicycles and sporting goods at 1028 Arch. Merchants on the street are eager to point out that the street's difficult transition is well under way from a wholesale district and haven for seedy sleaze parlors to a neighborhood of restaurants and shops adjacent to the city's proposed new convention center.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By Maida Odom, Inquirer Staff Writer
A 15-year-old street festival that closes several blocks of Old City three weekends each summer has some of the city's key restaurateurs crying foul and spewing bitterness. If the Old City Block Party, given by the Olde Philadelphia Restaurant and Business Association, is held Labor Day, Old Original Bookbinder's owner John Taxin has vowed to close his doors all day. On July Fourth, Taxin closed three hours early - at 7 p.m. - saying the festival choked off traffic, discouraging customers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2010
By Rachel Gouk Saturday Heritage journey Several local museums including the African American Museum and the Academy of Natural Sciences are among the venues offering free admission celebrating Smithsonian Magazine's sixth Annual Museum Day on Saturday. The academy, located at 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information: 215-299-1000. The museum, at 701 Arch St., will be open the same hours. Information: 215-574-0380, www.aampmuseum.org . For a full list of free venues and to secure the official ticket, go to www.smithsonian.
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NEWS
June 16, 2015 | BY DAN SPINELLI, Daily News Staff Writer spineld@phillynews.com, 215-854-5906
A DASH OF discontent accompanied the music, food and dancing at the 40th anniversary of the Odunde street festival on South Street yesterday. The festival, which hosted nearly 500,000 attendees, is an annual celebration of African-American culture and tradition. It was founded in 1975 by Lois Fernandez and Ruth Arthur, who based it on a celebration by the Yoruba people of Nigeria - who celebrated the coming of another year with offerings to Oshun, the goddess of the river. Colorful vendors lit up South Street from 21st to 23rd all day, as sellers peddled cotton candy and funnel cake alongside traditional African drums and gowns.
NEWS
June 16, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the 40th Odunde Festival got underway Sunday in Center City, a steady stream of women admired the African clothing that Nana Maindoo-Yeboah was selling from her booth on South Street. One tried on a gold-colored gele, a piece of traditional Nigerian headgear, while others complimented Maindoo-Yeboah's cotton wax print dress, which flared below the hips. Maindoo-Yeboah left her corporate job 20 years ago to sell the clothing, often at festivals such as Odunde, which organizers say is the largest African American street festival in the country.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gus Sarno still makes cakes in the basement of the South Philadelphia rowhouse his grandfather bought in 1904 and turned into Isgro Pastries. He still stacks cookies into boxes at the dining room table where his family ate supper 60 years ago when the doorbell to the shop wasn't ringing. Sarno still sells cannolis out of glass cases a few steps from his grandmother's original kitchen. The bakery at 1009 Christian St., in other words, has seen a lot come and go at the Italian Market - good times, bad times, so-so times.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
A FISTFUL OF FREE comics, an earful of 40 live bands, a street full of 100 vendors, an eyeful of 27 artists, a mouthful of 30 eateries, a mugful of German beer and a pop-up lawn of family fun stuff may draw crowds of 30,000 to today's free South Street Spring Festival from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. "South Street is like the boardwalk of Philadelphia," said restaurateur Daniel Christensen, who co-owns Copabanana and Redwood bistro, and chairs the South Street...
FOOD
July 19, 2013
Food Calendar    Saturday, July 20 "Sidework Series II" art exhibition , at Metropolitan Gallery 250, featuring pieces from artists working at local restaurants such as Oyster House, Continental Midtown, Milk & Honey, and more. Viewing hours are Saturdays and Sundays through August 25th from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For information, blog.metropolitanbakery.com; Metropolitan Gallery 250, 250 S. 18th St.    Wednesday, July 24 "Sip, Socialize and Serve" by ACHIEVEability , taking place from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Brauhaus Schmitz, following Center City Sips.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oshunbumi Fernandez cannot remember a year without Odunde. Philadelphia's annual festival of African culture was founded by her mother, Lois Fernandez, in 1975. "I was strapped to my mother's back at the first Odunde," said Oshunbumi, better known as "Bumi," who has been the festival's chief executive officer since 2006. "Running Odunde, to me, is like breathing. " The Odunde festival - meaning "happy new year" in the Yoruba language of West Africa, predominantly Nigeria - will mark its 38th anniversary on Sunday by transforming a swath of South Philadelphia into a giant marketplace of Africana.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012 | By Brian McManus, For The Inquirer
On any given night, Second Street in Northern Liberties is a bustling, lively scene. The young and tattooed dine alfresco at Cantina Dos Segundos. Beer nerds pop into the Foodery for a six-pack of hard-to-find-elsewhere brews. Couples stroll leisurely along Liberties Walk or in Liberty Lands Park. Masochists take in a Phillies game on the big screen at the Piazza at Schmidts. That wasn't always the case. William Reed, owner of Standard Tap, recalls a time before the neighborhood's still relatively recent renewal took hold.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Dara McBride and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The 37th annual Odunde Festival, Philadelphia's African American street party, drew to a close Sunday with estimates that as many as 500,000 had attended, providing an economic boost to more than 100 vendors along South Street in Grays Ferry. "We're more than just a festival, we're an economic driver," said Oshunbumi "Bumi" Fernandez, chief executive officer of Odunde, the educational and cultural organization that sponsors the event. Fernandez's mother, Lois, started the festival in the 1970s with Fernandez, then just a year old, in attendance strapped to her back.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2011 | By Dante Anthony Fuoco
Friday-Sunday Storm the Bastille Eastern State Penitentiary will host its annual Fairmount Bastille Day Festival this weekend, celebrating the 1789 event that marked the start of the French Revolution. On Friday and Sunday, participating Fairmount restaurants will have special offers for French food and drink. The penitentiary, at 2027 Fairmount Ave., will host a street festival from 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday with music, a costume contest, a pet parade, and a fashion show. A reenactment of the storming of the Bastille will be at 5:30 p.m. Guests are invited to dress as French peasants and aristocrats.
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 1 p.m. Friday, cars, pedestrians, and bicyclists with any common sense will have to take a detour through the heart of Center City to make way for a 200-ton crane that will lumber onto Broad Street between Locust and Pine. Once the crane is in position, a chandelier-type contraption, recently shipped here from France, will be suspended from it. Then, at sundown, a troupe of 18 aerialists from Lyons will be lifted 100 feet into the air and, hanging from the chandelier, will practice their routine, playing twinkly music and spinning in circles.
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