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Street Food

NEWS
June 25, 1995 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It doesn't have the merry jingle of an ice cream truck. It brings no sweets. But the children scramble just the same when the yellow truck makes the slow, steep climb up Logavina Street. The truck carries fresh drinking water - truly a cause for celebration in these bare-bone times. But a cause for worry, too. Just venturing out for a loaf of bread or a bucket of water in this besieged capital is a perilous act. Logavina Street has become so dangerous in recent months that the intersections are plastered with hand-lettered signs that say: Pazi Snajper.
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Michael Klein, Staff Writer
With a political convention's wheeling and dealing comes wining and dining. The 50,000 delegates, guests, and media representatives from around the country visiting later this month for the Democratic National Convention must eat. Restaurateurs are counting on all the visitors to shake the city's traditional summer doldrums, with delegates diving into dim sum in Chinatown, politicos gnawing on roast pork on South Street, and reporters slurping oysters...
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
What follows is a summary of the restaurants reviewed this year, primarily on Sundays, but also in Thursday Food features. As always, there were second chances and revisits to a handful of restaurants to check for improvement. I went back to six places that seemed within striking distance of a rating change - those are designated with an asterisk. Good news there: One stepped up from two to three bells (Aldine), one moved from one to two (Ardé), another climbed out of the no-bells basement (Bonchon)
NEWS
April 1, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Health Department in March asked dozens of restaurants and other eateries to "discontinue food operations" following less than glowing inspections. In previous months, a failing inspection would have earned a sterner-sounding order to cease-and-desist, a toothless demand that the restaurant was free to ignore. But following an agreement with the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections earlier this year, the health department is now reserving "cease-and-desist" for instances when the establishment refuses to close voluntarily.
NEWS
February 24, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The funeral director was discussing cremation with the bereaved family. When she told them that their father's artificial joint would be removed from the ashes and sent to a facility where the metal would be recycled, the mood brightened. "Dad was all about recycling," the mourners told Maryeileen Appio, manager of the Kirk & Nice funeral home in Plymouth Meeting. Appio recalled their saying, "He'd be thrilled that one of the last things he could do was have some parts recycled.
FOOD
January 24, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last few years, Philly's mobile-food industry has finally begun to catch up with the city's impressive restaurant scene, as dozens of chefs and entrepreneurs debut creative concepts well beyond gyros and soft pretzels. Now, those food trucks selling pork-cheek tacos and grass-fed burgers are spurring a secondary market: new and improved commissaries designed just for them. The facilities are equipped not just with basic prep tables and sanitizing sinks, but also with full commercial kitchens, secure parking, and lots of extras.
FOOD
January 7, 2010
A few things that Mumbai, India, ingrains in you: a taste for Bollywood, a tolerance of traffic, and a love of chaat , the street food of old Bombay. So I lit up when I saw Desi Chaat, a tiny, West Philly take-out storefront. The samosa had spent a little too long under the heat lamp. But the papri chaat (distinguished by boiled potatoes and chickpeas) made me smile. Your typical chaat employs a mixture of savories, in this case tossed with mango and pomegranate seeds and dotted with yogurt and mint, tamarind-date and plum sauces that you stir into crispy bits made here from (slightly oily)
NEWS
January 24, 2012
  The Asian street-food bandwagon has picked up some Main Line polish, as Nectar chef Patrick Feury has taken the steamed pork bun to a dangerous place: potential addiction. Feury has sourced a perfect bun, a palm-sized white cloud of fold-over pastry. But it's the pork belly inside that got me, which Feury gives the expected fusion approach, the well-trimmed meat rolled up like Italian porchetta, then basted in a dark, gingery Asian braise. Perfectly rendered, but still tender and juicy, the pork roulade is shined with hoisin, then dabbed with sriracha-spiked Kewpie Japanese mayonnaise.
NEWS
December 13, 2013
What to eat: We asked co-owner Mike Sultan what's good. "Everything," he replied. Not wanting to take his word for it, we ordered a sampling of most of that day's menu. Turns out, Sultan was right. From the smoked pork carnitas with pickled vegetables and serrano aioli to the adobo-spiced carne asada beef torta with fried egg, cheese, red salsa and spicy creme, Taco Mondo instantly became one of our favorite food trucks in Philly. Don't miss: Crispy brisket tacos with house-made barbecue sauce (13 ingredients)
FOOD
March 12, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Let's cut to the chase: The reaction to the news last week that Tony Luke's, the gritty South Philly sandwich stand, was coming out with a frozen, microwavable/boil-in-a-bag version of its venerable cheesesteak was not exactly positive. "Sounds gross," was one of the milder e-mailed posts. "Two words," went another: " Nas-Tee . " "Blechhh," spat another. Then they got personal: "Tony sold out to The Man!" They had another thing in common. None of the commenters (except one, a defender)
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