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Street Furniture

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NEWS
February 14, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writerransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
City Council sees dollar signs on publicly-owned property. Sound familiar? Council President Darrell Clarke introduced legislation more than a year ago to authorize digital ads on city-owned property and he plans to reintroduce the bill Thursday. "I think it's very important, as I have said time after time to create revenue opportunities for the city, thereby the citizens, other than sticking our hands into the citizens' pockets and increasing taxes," said Clarke. A consultant for Council said the city could generate $8 million from advertising on public buildings, bus shelters, trash trucks or receptacles.
NEWS
July 17, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will be one of the Street administration's last acts: awarding a 20-year contract - likely the largest in Philadelphia history - that will change the look of city streets and pump millions into the city treasury. The subject is "street furniture" and no, it's not the kitchen chairs Philadelphians put out after a snowstorm to save their parking spot. City officials are now weighing proposals from three companies to design, install and maintain - for the next two decades - hundreds of new bus shelters, newsstands, trash receptacles, public toilets and benches.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alone on a boardwalk bench in Ocean City, N.J., Michael Porreca has the chance to be with his father. "Sitting on the bench is a nice time to clear the head and think back positively about my dad and the relationship he gave me," said Porreca, 55, who now lives in Denver. "He loved Ocean City, he loved going down there so much. " Porreca feels connected to the deep blue bench, which contains a simple but heartfelt message: "In loving memory of Wayne J. Porreca / 1932-1998 / A Wonderful Father / David, Michael, Mark & Wayne Jr. " The bench was placed in 1997, after Wayne Porreca died of a stroke at age 65. It offered a way for the family to both cope with its grief and celebrate the good times at the Shore.
NEWS
April 23, 1989
If you haven't strolled along Walnut Street in Center City for a while, you're in for a pleasant surprise. With each passing month, the street gets more appealing: The shop windows, building facades and restaurants suggest a downtown that's on the way up. That will seem even truer when two important anchors on the street - the ground-floor shops in the renovated Bellevue and the Rittenhouse condominiums on Rittenhouse Square - open for business....
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Redecorate a house, and sometimes you have to upgrade the furniture. Redecorate the city, and some might argue it's time for new street furniture, say, some new newsstands. You know the old ones. They speckle the urban landscape like appliances in the home - functional but not always pretty, manned by vendors offering as their main product newspapers and magazines. There are 179 actively licensed in the city. For safety reasons, city regulations now require that the newsstands be built of aluminum, steel or other durable material such as fiberglass, and that they meet certain other standards, which means some operators are going to have to make alterations.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Traffic engineers have words for the sidewalk congestion that comes daily with the buses and commuter trains, the cabs and cars - terms like street furniture and shy zones. So does Edgar Shapiro - terms like awful and murder. "It's awful, trying to get around," said Shapiro, who likes to spend early afternoons strolling the tree-lined walkways of Rittenhouse Square near his home but finds them pretty clogged these days. "I like the warmer weather, but it's murder trying to walk on these sidewalks.
NEWS
October 24, 2003 | By Gray Smith
About 10 years ago, when the Avenue of the Arts was created, an egalitarian approach was adopted. One avenue would be south of City Hall, and one would be to the north, each with thriving arts venues. Since then, South Broad Street has flourished as the epicenter of all sorts of arts. Conversely, there is hardly any notice of the north section, and little arts thereon. Only the lonely Freedom Theater struggles there. With recent developments between City Hall and Spring Garden Street, it is odd that the other Avenue of the Arts gets no respect.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By Thomas Hine, Inquirer Architecture Critic
We build our towering architectural statements of fantasy and ego high in the air, but the public life, and the design that defines it, happens on the ground. In recent decades, Philadelphia, like many other cities, has tried in several places to enhance and defend its beleaguered public spaces through the use of decorative pavements, along with special light standards, benches, trash cans and other elements that have been collectively labeled "street furniture. " This has happened not only on the Chestnut Street Transitway and on Market Street east of City Hall, but also, on a smaller, less-expensive scale, on such neighborhood commercial strips as 52d Street.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | By ROSS BRIGHTWELL
Chestnut Street is in a decline. Empty storefronts gape where quality shops once prospered. The sidewalks, bus stands and street furniture are in disrepair. Not surprisingly, the public's perception of the street is pretty negative. But Chestnut Street simply suffers from the same problems as much of Philadelphia: the lack of a unified will and the confidence in its ability to make things better. From river to river, Chestnut Street is the city's main pedestrian thoroughfare and public transit throughway.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1975, the idea for revitalizing Chestnut Street was to build extra-wide sidewalks to invite strollers and ban all motor traffic except public transit. Now the idea for revitalizing it is to put it all back the way it was. "It would be a great thing," said Paul Levy, executive director of the Center City District, who says Mayor Rendell has already decided to remove the last vestiges of the Transitway, as Chestnut has been called between Eighth and 18th Streets. Rendell's press representative insisted yesterday that the mayor had not yet made a decision on the Transitway and would not until meeting with Levy and members of the district, mostly merchants and property owners in the area.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia didn't need Bicycling magazine to confirm that it is one of America's best biking cities (No. 17 on its 2012 list). You can see it every day on the streets: The steady stream of commuters sluicing down Center City's bike lanes. The tangle of bikes hitched to U-shaped racks and bike corrals. (More, please.) The proliferation of neighborhood bike shops. Philadelphia probably could have ranked higher in the magazine's esteem if it had a bike-sharing program, like most of the list's top 20 cities.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writerransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
City Council sees dollar signs on publicly-owned property. Sound familiar? Council President Darrell Clarke introduced legislation more than a year ago to authorize digital ads on city-owned property and he plans to reintroduce the bill Thursday. "I think it's very important, as I have said time after time to create revenue opportunities for the city, thereby the citizens, other than sticking our hands into the citizens' pockets and increasing taxes," said Clarke. A consultant for Council said the city could generate $8 million from advertising on public buildings, bus shelters, trash trucks or receptacles.
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Dara McBride, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alone on a boardwalk bench in Ocean City, N.J., Michael Porreca has the chance to be with his father. "Sitting on the bench is a nice time to clear the head and think back positively about my dad and the relationship he gave me," said Porreca, 55, who now lives in Denver. "He loved Ocean City, he loved going down there so much. " Porreca feels connected to the deep blue bench, which contains a simple but heartfelt message: "In loving memory of Wayne J. Porreca / 1932-1998 / A Wonderful Father / David, Michael, Mark & Wayne Jr. " The bench was placed in 1997, after Wayne Porreca died of a stroke at age 65. It offered a way for the family to both cope with its grief and celebrate the good times at the Shore.
NEWS
July 17, 2007 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It will be one of the Street administration's last acts: awarding a 20-year contract - likely the largest in Philadelphia history - that will change the look of city streets and pump millions into the city treasury. The subject is "street furniture" and no, it's not the kitchen chairs Philadelphians put out after a snowstorm to save their parking spot. City officials are now weighing proposals from three companies to design, install and maintain - for the next two decades - hundreds of new bus shelters, newsstands, trash receptacles, public toilets and benches.
NEWS
October 24, 2003 | By Gray Smith
About 10 years ago, when the Avenue of the Arts was created, an egalitarian approach was adopted. One avenue would be south of City Hall, and one would be to the north, each with thriving arts venues. Since then, South Broad Street has flourished as the epicenter of all sorts of arts. Conversely, there is hardly any notice of the north section, and little arts thereon. Only the lonely Freedom Theater struggles there. With recent developments between City Hall and Spring Garden Street, it is odd that the other Avenue of the Arts gets no respect.
NEWS
July 7, 2000 | by Mark McDonald , Daily News Staff Writer
Mayor Street said yesterday that chief of staff Stephanie Franklin-Suber could have spent less than the $59,000 she has spent on furniture for her new office and that "on the face of it, it looks inappropriate. " But Street said he was undecided whether to accept her offer to reimburse the city $10,000 for part of the roughly $30,000 cost of the solid-cherry furniture she's having made for her office and an adjoining newly constructed conference room. The remaining $19,000 in furniture is standard office furniture for the staff in her office.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | By Laura J. Bruch, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Redecorate a house, and sometimes you have to upgrade the furniture. Redecorate the city, and some might argue it's time for new street furniture, say, some new newsstands. You know the old ones. They speckle the urban landscape like appliances in the home - functional but not always pretty, manned by vendors offering as their main product newspapers and magazines. There are 179 actively licensed in the city. For safety reasons, city regulations now require that the newsstands be built of aluminum, steel or other durable material such as fiberglass, and that they meet certain other standards, which means some operators are going to have to make alterations.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | By Mark Davis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Traffic engineers have words for the sidewalk congestion that comes daily with the buses and commuter trains, the cabs and cars - terms like street furniture and shy zones. So does Edgar Shapiro - terms like awful and murder. "It's awful, trying to get around," said Shapiro, who likes to spend early afternoons strolling the tree-lined walkways of Rittenhouse Square near his home but finds them pretty clogged these days. "I like the warmer weather, but it's murder trying to walk on these sidewalks.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | By Larry Fish, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In 1975, the idea for revitalizing Chestnut Street was to build extra-wide sidewalks to invite strollers and ban all motor traffic except public transit. Now the idea for revitalizing it is to put it all back the way it was. "It would be a great thing," said Paul Levy, executive director of the Center City District, who says Mayor Rendell has already decided to remove the last vestiges of the Transitway, as Chestnut has been called between Eighth and 18th Streets. Rendell's press representative insisted yesterday that the mayor had not yet made a decision on the Transitway and would not until meeting with Levy and members of the district, mostly merchants and property owners in the area.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | By ROSS BRIGHTWELL
Chestnut Street is in a decline. Empty storefronts gape where quality shops once prospered. The sidewalks, bus stands and street furniture are in disrepair. Not surprisingly, the public's perception of the street is pretty negative. But Chestnut Street simply suffers from the same problems as much of Philadelphia: the lack of a unified will and the confidence in its ability to make things better. From river to river, Chestnut Street is the city's main pedestrian thoroughfare and public transit throughway.
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